Nvidia puts the kibosh on the GeForce Partner Program

What have you heard about the GeForce Partner Program, gerbils? Well, it doesn't really matter, since it's over now. Nvidia put up a blog post today that says the company has decided to cancel the program amid “rumors, conjecture, and mistruths” regarding its nature and function.

In the blog post, Nvidia emphasizes that the GeForce Partner Program (GPP) was about clarity and transparency. Nvidia says it simply wanted to make sure that “gamers who want Nvidia tech get Nvidia tech.” It is a little bit difficult to imagine someone walking into a store with the intent to buy a GeForce and walking out with a Radeon on accident, but regardless that seems to be the scenario that Nvidia is presenting.

The company specifically notes that the GPP was not an attempt to take control of its partners' brands. Nvidia goes on to say that its partners agreed with the goal of making sure that the GPU brand was transparent to the purchaser, and not “hidden behind a pile of techno-jargon.” This is, again, a little odd given that every board vendor includes the GeForce or Radeon model designation in its graphics card names.

In any case, the GPP is behind us now. Nvidia says it's canceling the program “to avoid any distraction from the super exciting work we're doing.” While almost everyone loves Nvidia's efficient GeForce GPUs, the aforementioned rumors and conjecture surrounding the GPP certainly weren't helping Nvidia's public image. No doubt the negative press resulting from the program—justified or otherwise—was another major reason for its cancellation.

It will be interesting to see the impact of the GPP's cancellation on Asus' Arez brand for Radeons. That's to say nothing of other AMD-based articles that lost their premium branding, like Gigabyte's RX 580 Gaming Box. Perhaps soon we'll again see ROG- and Aorus-branded products containing competitor GPUs.

Comments closed
    • odizzido
    • 1 year ago

    Maybe they can start working on their adaptive sync program instead now.

    • dodozoid
    • 1 year ago

    In Czech republic, Asus now lists Radeons under it’s ROG brand again… So much for the late GPP “not being anti-competitive and transparent”
    It is hopefully really gone and won’t be missed…

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 1 year ago

    Add this to another win for AMD in 2018.

    Excluding the aforementioned wins.

    1. Dismantling Illegal Nvidia programs.

    The wins are adding up.

    #ryzenabove

    • JoeKiller
    • 1 year ago

    Nvidias actions sounds like classic racing line, “If you ain’t cheating you ain’t trying.” Intel took some egg to face lately too with their agressive pipelines.

    • ludi
    • 1 year ago

    The more I chew on this, the more I wonder if the real target of the GPP was not desktop GPUs as such, but the Intel Kaby/Vega M parts.

    House brands like Asus RoG probably don’t do much to sell desktop GPUs more than the GeForce or Radeon logo that’s also on the box, especially since the final product ends up insdie a chassis. But they do feature prominently in selling high-margin toys like gaming laptops, and the Intel/Vega parts with onboard HBM are probably a more cost-effective solution for the ODM to design and build compared to adding a separate Nvidia GPU and supporting systemboard components.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      It has always been its primary target since the start.

      Nvidia is trying to fight the inevitable decline of discrete GPUs as integrated GPU solutions start becoming “good enough” for the masses.

        • DancinJack
        • 1 year ago

        “integrated” and “good enough” are definitely key terms there and open to interpretation.

      • Action.de.Parsnip
      • 1 year ago

      This. Kyle at hardocp brought that up originally. Intel and amd tying up causes an existential threat to nvidia, nvidia doubles down on their primary market. GPP is a defensive move to secure nvidias next 10 years. Or so the theory goes.

      Kyle – again – reckons kabylake G laptops going nowhere in the market is a direct result of nvidias behind the scenes leaning on laptop vendors. Tbh if that really were true – and it’s pure speculation – intel have sooo many ways of striking back at nvidia. Like ultra evil ways. Oh you want samples of a new chipset and microcode/cpu before its launch? You want tech engagement for your mobile graphics in our new latops? Nope. You buy at retail on day 1. And amd is the primary supplier now. Seeya l8er loserrrrrrrrrrrrrr

      Seriously in fantasyland now but it’s scary to speculate. Although it took some dozens of millions to develop kabylake G and they will be pissed.

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      Steve said pretty much the same thing in a GPP info dump in his latest [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8C6GtZ6U_S8<]AskGN episode[/url<]. Nvidia is spooked by Kaby Lake-G and launched GPP targetting the big OEMs, hoping their gamer line will become Nvidia exclusive. But the Intel marketing machine is much bigger than GPP and none of their actual targets bit the bait. It's a combination of missing that intended goal, possible legal repercussions, and the bad PR that's led to GPP getting killed off. Let's just say GPP struck out in spectacular fashion.

    • Amiga500+
    • 1 year ago

    The damage is already done.

    Since I don’t need top end GPU performance; it’ll be a long time before I buy Nvidia again.

      • gecko575
      • 1 year ago

      Agreed.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Guess Nvidia is officially replacing GPP with BSS (that last S stands for Statement).

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Ordered a GTX 1050, got a Voodoo15 9990 instead. So disappointed. Don’t cancel the GPP Jensen.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Nvidia’s ‘reasons’ for cancelling GPP are almost as dubious as the legality of the GPP in the first place.

    No matter how they try to spin it, GPP was a douchebag move that has harmed their brand image, not that they played particularly fair in the first place, mind….

      • stefem
      • 1 year ago

      We all can (and should) rise doubt, even if we actually don’t know regulatory rules but if they were really considering GPP to be illegal they would have sued NVIDIA, back in the day they sued Intel I can’t think that now they are in a situation were they can’t sue the small (compared to Intel) NVIDIA which has roughly the same size of AMD

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        There’s a thread on the forum discussing this in more detail. The armchair internet legal gerbils seem to agree that it’s of dubious legality, but even though AMD could sue, they can’t really afford to.

        We could still see this turn into some kind of legal battle in the future, since I’m sure that GPP has caused a lot of bad blood between Nvidia and it’s partners, and AMD will want a slice of (financial) revenge from this if they’re ever in a position to take this to court without it sucking up too much of their time, money and manpower.

    • Welch
    • 1 year ago

    Basically,

    “Yeah, we didn’t expect for people to catch on to our dirty tricks, but they did… So… Nothing to see here folks”.

    It’s hard to talk about their playing dirty if there is no name for the game they are playing. Keep your eye on the ball to see if OEMs keep those gaming brands exclusive to Nvidia.

    Imagine the man hours and money spent already to come up with Arez and god knows what else. Perhaps Nvidia was hoping for this exact response from AMD. Force their hand and they can almost claim that “hey, we didn’t do anything wrong, AMD created it’s own brand /shrug”.

      • mtcn77
      • 1 year ago

      Except, OEM’s have always relegated their Radeon gpus to non-standard Nvidia compatible coolers; otherwise how does anybody explain putting horizontal direct-heatpipes on a diagonal gpu? Punish the OEM’s: it is even easier if you just look for brands performing the slowest – usually they are the mentioned suckers.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 1 year ago

        [quote<]otherwise how does anybody explain putting horizontal direct-heatpipes on a diagonal gpu? [/quote<] Sorry... what? Even if there was such a thing as a diagonal GPU, the only thing that matters for the cooler is that it dissipates heat. And best of luck fitting a diagonal cooler in a rectangular case... not to mention managing the airflow would be fun.

      • LauRoman
      • 1 year ago

      Except that Asus and Arez is not that big of an issue for Asus…
      Think more about a smaller OEM that makes a gaming laptop.
      Branding on a laptop is usually way more visible than a gaming card…
      Think about RMAint that thing and then having to explain why the branding is different for a generation.

    • NTMBK
    • 1 year ago

    Glad that nonsense is over. Nvidia have been doing great, no need for dirty tricks like GPP. Hopefully they can get back to focusing on making more awesome products.

    • meerkt
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]making sure that the GPU brand was transparent to the purchaser, and not "hidden behind a pile of techno-jargon."[/quote<] Clueless customer: The box says it's 1257MHz base clock, 2304 Polaris 20 cores, 36 CUs, 144 TUs, 32 ROPs, GCN4 architecture, 5792 SP GFLOPS, manufactured on GloFo's 14nm process, and it supports Vulkan and FreeSync. Surely this is the Nvidia GeForce™ I wanted!

      • stefem
      • 1 year ago

      So what was the problem in the first place? How could GPP hurt customer or costumer choice?

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        Um, because costumer?

        • mtcn77
        • 1 year ago

        Laptops launch to a premium brand at a premium. The aforementioned brand sets how it is placed in the tiering system. Exclusivity sets the price.

      • OptimumSlinky
      • 1 year ago

      The audacity of the company that sells two different GPUs under the same model name (1060 3GB vs 1060 6GB) to whine about wanting “transparency” is hilariously Trumpian.

    • LauRoman
    • 1 year ago

    Wonder how much lost money smaller OEMs sunk into this…

    • tipoo
    • 1 year ago

    God, I hate it when I confuse an Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080 TI for an AMD Radeon Vega 64, they just need more branding!

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 1 year ago

      ROG and Arez will clear up any confusion. You see, Arez is AMD only. But ROG, it used to be everything, then nVidia only, then dunno.
      Got it?

      • Wirko
      • 1 year ago

      Always buy from Aorog, the biceps eagle. Or is it Arog. Or is it lower jaw. Dunno.

    • torquer
    • 1 year ago

    ah the Internet, where nothing is so hated as a successful company/person/idea

      • jarder
      • 1 year ago

      except for Trolls 🙂

      • ronch
      • 1 year ago

      Successful because of anticompetitive practices, that is.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 1 year ago

        Meh, they didn’t need to be jerks to gain their position (but they chose to be jerk anyway).

          • ronch
          • 1 year ago

          I was speaking in general terms, since he was also speaking in general terms about the internet, despite the topic being Nvidia.

    • uni-mitation
    • 1 year ago

    “You see? I told you so! They canceled it because they got caught!

    AMD Fanboy

    “The AMD smear machine is the only thing that works!”

    Nvidia Fanboy

    And everyone continues in their own self-delusions. One word, many interpretations.

    uni-mitation

      • ludi
      • 1 year ago

      “I’ll make ’em an offer they can’t refuse.”

      Jen Hsun

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 1 year ago

      Someone already said it before that signature in a comment is redundant.
      Principal Skinner.

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        It is advisable to leave two or three spaces between the signature and last sentence.

        uni-mitation

      • willmore
      • 1 year ago

      In every arguement, there are three sides. You side, their side, and the truth.

        • Brainsan
        • 1 year ago

        Kosh: Understanding is a three-edged sword.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    Coming next month: The Nvidia Friend Program

    Nvidia, I’ll be your friend if you release new GSync monitors that are a meaningful upgrade from 2015 tech.

    Much Love,
    Kretschmer

      • cynan
      • 1 year ago

      That doesn’t cost 50% more than the FreeSync 2 equivalent?

      • uni-mitation
      • 1 year ago

      You are late to the party. This is an exclusive TR exclusive for Gerbils only.

      *leaked board room combo*
      [quote=”Jen Hsun”<] Let's start a new program where we release a flagship top-of-the-line graphics card that costs a kidney. Only that it will be supplanted in three months by an even better graphics cards with better performance at reasonable prices from our hardware partners without the accompanying banshee. [/quote<] [quote="Marketing Sith Lord"<] We will call it Titan XP. [/quote<] uni-mitation

        • Kretschmer
        • 1 year ago

        I actually like my FE blower 1080Ti for mITX cases. Unless you mean the Titan->XX80Ti play, which I love. Titan buyers subsidize the rest of us!

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          I am confused! I don’t know what you are talking about. All this talk about Radeons & GeForces, I can’t tell ’em apart. I need clear concise colors! Greens and Reds! Team Magma & Team Aqua! Batman & Superman. Those I understand!

          uni-mitation

    • cynan
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]...cancel the program amid "rumors, conjecture, and mistruths" regarding its nature and function.[/quote<] In other words, don't have a policy or program that gives you, the market share leader, the potential for strategies that, at least optically, can be construed to further cement said market position by anti-competitive means (or in the long run, it may just end up costing as much market advantage as it stands to provide). Lesson learned.

      • Tom Yum
      • 1 year ago

      Exactly, they had every opportunity to fight the “rumors, conjecture, and mistruths” publically but didn’t. Why? Because it was completely indefensible and anti-competitive. Not one OEM came out in support of the program because nVidia had gagged them from talking about it. It has also exposed some parts of the tech industry who are so reliant on tech OEM largesse that they can’t report impartially, with many just refusing to report at all. So good riddance to the program, though I’ll believe that when I see ROG or Aorus Radeons again.

        • cynan
        • 1 year ago

        At least some of that is on AMD for not getting a competitive high-end gaming GPU out the door in generations. When was the last time? HD7970 vs GTX 680? Come on Navi! (fanboy of competition)

          • EndlessWaves
          • 1 year ago

          It sounds like you expect AMD’s ‘competitive’ option to be outright better, and not just competitive. That’s not exactly a balanced yardstick.

          Not that the tiny fraction of sales that make up the high end matters to most of us.

            • cynan
            • 1 year ago

            Who cares what you or I expect or want, really. That’s beside the point.

            Just because it doesn’t matter to “most of us”, doesn’t mean that the fact that AMD doesn’t have a competitive market flagship product has nothing to do with a company like ASUS featuring AMD GPUs under their premium gaming brand…

            • cynan
            • 1 year ago

            [quote<]It sounds like you expect AMD's 'competitive' option to be outright better, and not just competitive. That's not exactly a balanced yardstick. [/quote<] Of course it's a balanced yardstick. Nvidia's recent dominance in high-end gaming is precisely why there are ROG Nvidia GPUs and not AMD (and why a program like this could ever have existed in the first place).

            • ludi
            • 1 year ago

            You seem to be simultaneously correct on facts yet confused on the implications. When someone has a dominant market position AND begins using it to exclude competitor’s products from the marketplace, that’s where anti-competitive/anti-trust questions start to come in. Nvidia was setting the table so that Asus could effectively never again sell an AMD GPU under Asus’ own house brand (RoG) so long as the GPP was in effect.

            Would Asus have to be a GPP? Technically, no. Could they be a GPP and come up with a new house brand for Nvidia products? Technically, yes. But in a duopoly market with one dominant supplier, either of those would be suicide.

            Nvidia knew what they were doing, and what they were doing was shenanigans. It’s one thing to produce your own branding and license it to partners who use your product, or even to even require that your branding be displayed prominently when your partners sell your product under their own banner. It’s another to effectively take over your partner’s house brands by setting them up with a “heads I win, tails you lose” coin toss.

            • cynan
            • 1 year ago

            Wow. Look, generally, there are basically 2 determinants of market share (i.e., historical demand) for something like a high-end gaming GPU: 1. Performance 2. Price (and I suppose, supply – but that is usually proportionate to price). If AMD had been able to consistently provide a product that was competitive on these factors, Nvidia would have never even considered a GPP because they would have been laughed at (unless AMD was doing the same). And just being competitive in the mid and low-end was not enough to wing the aspirations of said high-end brand.

            Furthermore, the fact that AMD did not provide any recent competition in the high-end gaming GPU sector basically allowed Nvidia to call the shots with OEMs with potentially anti-competitive and thus OEM as well as competitor – AMD – and customer-hurting programs. In other words, lack of competition in the high end meant that any OEM wanting a brand to be viewed as the epitomy of cutting-edge gaming to be Nvidia’s bitch.

            • kruky
            • 1 year ago

            So if you have a gun and start shooting at me it is my fault for not having a gun to shoot back? That’s not really how it works (even tho a lot of people in one country think so).

            • cynan
            • 1 year ago

            It’s not about fault, blame. It’s about what companies (in this example, Nvidia) can get away with. If the criminal laws were such that I people could get away with shooting others (on the grounds that it was their responsibility to defend themselves, or whatever), then more people that had guns would “start shooting” – especially if they had anything to potentially gain by it. Doesn’t mean it’s the target’s fault in any sort of moral sense.

            While AMD isn’t to blame for Nvidias purportedly anti-competitive, and now defunct, GPP, their lack of competition in flagship PC gaming in recent years is certainly a contributing factor to programs and policies of their ilk gaining traction with OEMs.

            • Action.de.Parsnip
            • 1 year ago

            Repeatedly missing the point. It isn’t about superior hardware, it never was. They even cancelled the program and here you are with your fingers in your ears LALALA I CAN’T HEAR YOU

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            Haven’t seen a valid opinion this unpopular since the last time I posted in a warranty-related thread. 😆

      • ludi
      • 1 year ago

      Lesson delivered. I doubt it was learned.

        • cynan
        • 1 year ago

        touche

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        One imagines NVidia’s evil marketing geniuses twirling their mustaches and resolving to be more genius the next time.
        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1j7lyRnxVE[/url<]

      • GrimDanfango
      • 1 year ago

      Lesson learned – Remember to keep our flagrant anti-competitive practices hidden in the future, like we’ve always done. Turning them into a big, obvious branding exercise is a really bad idea!

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 1 year ago

    “Sorry not sorry”

    • benedict
    • 1 year ago

    Asus, Gigabyte and MSI already removed Radeons from their gaming brands. GPP is not over until that situation is rectified.

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      At least in the case of Asus, both retain the ‘gaming’ branding and the only change is a sticker-swap. [url=https://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/AREZ-STRIX-RXVEGA64-O8G-GAMING/<]'AREZ' Strix Vega[/url<] vs. [url=https://www.asus.com/uk/Graphics-Cards/ROG-STRIX-RXVEGA64-O8G-GAMING/<]'ROG' Strix Vega[/url<]. I'd be hard-pressed to tell which is which among all the bits of Random Marketing Bullshit lathered over the box if it were not pointed out specifically.

        • Firestarter
        • 1 year ago

        ROG is already a pretty established brand name though, having no AMD cards under the ROG brand is already a pretty good result for Nvidia

    • K-L-Waster
    • 1 year ago

    Sadly, now instead of starting flame wars about marketting BS we’ll have to argue about stuff that actually matters. Boring, boring boring…

      • cynan
      • 1 year ago

      Was Intel paying Dell to only sell their x86 CPUs also “marketing BS”?

        • Redocbew
        • 1 year ago

        Yes.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 1 year ago

        Not the same thing.

        This wasn’t going to stop anyone from selling AMD GPUs — at most it was going to limit which made up nonsense word was slapped on the box.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    It was good while it lasted.

    Back to #PoorVolta everybody!

    We’ll always have [s<]Paris[/s<] [u<]G-Sync[/u<].

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      Nobody swiped right on poor Jen Hsun.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This