Deal of the day: Alienware’s AW2518H 240-Hz G-Sync display for $350

What's this, a deal on Monday? That's right, gerbils and gerbilettes. We found something so sweet, so fluffy and warm, that we can't help but invite all of you to see. We're talking about a fantastic deal on the 25″ Alienware AW2518H monitor.

A lot of monitors claim to be meant for gaming, but we all know that word's often just another bullet point in marketing materials. We can assure you that that's not the case with the AW2518H, though. This display has an insane 240-Hz refresh rate coupled with Nvidia G-Sync adaptive-refresh-rate technology. Folks, if that combination won't offer smooth gameplay, we don't know what will.

The TN panel's resolution is 1920×1080, probably so that mid-range graphics cards can push FPS counters into the triple digits. Thanks to the 400 cd/m² brightness rating, the display's ULMB mode should prove brighter than most. The contrast ratio is a healthy 1000:1, and response time is naturally around 1 ms. If you're wondering about color reproduction, it's actually pretty good for a TN panel—Tom's Hardware found that once calibrated, the AW2518H offers quite a pretty picture. The monitor gets a five-star rating from Best Buy patrons, too.

Additional niceties include some of the sleekest styling we've seen to ever grace a desk, a stand with height adjustment, RGB LED lighting, and a four-port USB hub. At this monitor's current price, you may as well get more than one—the thin bezels around three sides will easily allow for a triple-head chimera setup.

You can currently get your eager gerbil mitts on the Alienware AW2518H for only $349.99 from Best Buy. That price is probably the lowest we've seen for a monitor with this kind of specs, and it's also one of the lowest for a G-Sync monitor in general. I'd hurry up if I was you.

Comments closed
    • gogogogg
    • 1 year ago

    Amazing picture quality overall, and the move to 240 Hz is really worth it — it basically eliminates all perceivable motion blur with the right contrast settings (by the way, set it below 65 for this monitor, for otherwise you will see pixel inversion).

    HOWEVER, only the 4TH monitor I received from Dell was finally free of “dead” pixels — and that was after running a pixel unstucker for ~ 12 hours. Each of the first 3 monitors had several unfixable dead/bright pixels.

      • uni-mitation
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<] pixel unstucker [/quote<] "Daddy, what is a pixel unstucker? "Well, son, before I tell you what it is I have to tell you the underlying mechanics of CRT and LDC displays. " 20 years laters "I am proud to be the next Mission Director at NASA for the colonization of Mars!" uni-mitation

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    I find it funny that so many G-Sync screens are low-resolution, high-refresh, TN panels.

    $350 is a [i<]relative[/i<] bargain for G-Sync but you can also buy 144Hz 1080 Freesync monitors for half that. As cool as 240Hz looks on paper, I'm pretty sure the human visual cortex stops being able to spot the difference after about 85-90Hz. Thing is, G-Sync puts things into the "premium" bracket and for $350 you can get 1440p or 4K solutions, and that's with better panel tech like VA or IPS as well. G-Sync isn't good [i<]enough[/i<] to warrant such a huge loss of resolution and panel quality, and the big spenders who can afford GTX 1080 and G-Sync monitors tend to be the "ultra" details people who are never going to get 240fps in the first place, even with their 1080Ti.

      • Firestarter
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]As cool as 240Hz looks on paper[/quote<] people can definitely tell the difference

        • gogogogg
        • 1 year ago

        Yes, we can. And this is not about smoothness alone. 240 Hz on this monitor basically eliminates motion blur. For instance, in League of Legends, where you have letters floating above the characters at all times, it makes a *huge* difference not to see blurry trails as the characters and letters move around.

        By the way, the colors are amazing. There is no escape from TN gamma shift, but colors overall are really, really nice. People underestimate what a good TN panel can look like.

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          The reason moving text looks better at 240Hz is because of reduced movement difference between frames caused by sample-and-hold blurring.

          You’d get [i<]even better[/i<] performance at 120Hz with ULMB, aka a strobing backlight. The illusion of motion stops benefitting from increased framerate at around 85Hz for most people. That's not the same as motion clarity improvements caused by a reduction of the sample time. The real issues come at high resulution ultra details. 120fps with a strobing backlight is fluid with motion clarity whilst also being achievable with a high-end graphics card. 240fps is fluid and has [i<]almost[/i<] as much motion clarity, but is totally unachievable at high-resolution and ultra details. Both the resolution and image quality must suffer just to reach the 240fps.

            • MathMan
            • 1 year ago

            The problem with ULMB is that you don’t have GSYNC mode.

            With 240Hz you get a bit more blurring than with ULMB, but you also get Gsync. And you get half the worst case reaction time.

            It’s an acceptable trade off.

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            True, but G-Sync is at it’s most valuable (and noticeable) when framerates are low, like 35-70 fps or so. Once you get beyond 100Hz, G-Sync (or Freesync) is practically invisible. Sure, you might get slightly better animation smoothness with Gsync beyond 100Hz, but the animation deviations are so small at those framerates that vsync 100Hz is almost indistinguishable to G-Sync.

            I’d rather have ULMB than G-Sync, but that’s because I prefer fluidity over detail. G-Sync is simply a way to avoid vsync quantisation issues that result in 59.99fps dropping to 30Hz on a slower 60Hz monitor; A 240Hz screen doesn’t even need G-Sync for ~60fps GPU performance, since the quantisation drops in such small increments from 60, to 48, to 40, to 34fps in much the same way that G-Sync would reduce the framerate in a more analogue way.

            Reaction time is and interesting one, because the G-Sync module has its own input lag. It’s not much (3-4ms) but add that to the monitor’s own input lag and you realise that beyond a certain point, other factors are more significant than inter-frame delays in creating perceived reaction time.

            • gogogogg
            • 1 year ago

            Regarding 240 Hz vs ULMB in the context of perceivable blurriness, I am going to say from personal experience with *this particular monitor* that 240 Hz is distinctly superior and without downsides once the contrast level is set to 65 or below. On the other hand, the downsides of ULMB are hugely perceptible to me; the vastly reduced brightness is not so much of a problem because I tend to use really low values, but the perception of micro-stuttering due to the way black frame insertion works makes ULMB unusable in my case. Plus, I can definitely feel G-Sync doing its smoothness magic even above 144 Hz, never mind a lot of games use a crappy V-Sync implementation and have occasional tearing that way.

            • Kretschmer
            • 1 year ago

            Why not both? Running a 240Hz TN panel at 120Hz with ULMB will be much crisper than a 144Hz IPS or MVA panel running @ 120Hz ULMB. And you can fall back on 240Hz GSync if 120 FPS is unrealistic.

          • Freon
          • 1 year ago

          Refresh rate (hz) and response rate (blur) are not necessarily the same thing. A 60hz monitor can have nearly zero motion blur if response rate is still fast (i.e. low attack/release time, ex. TN panels with overdrive), and likewise there are some VA panel displays claiming 200hz that still have very bad blur/ghosting because the response rate is slow, even slower than 1/200th of a second, making the refresh rate sort of a moot specification (ex. Z35).

      • MEATLOAF2
      • 1 year ago

      I can regularly tell the difference between different frame rates ranging from 60-144hz.

      There is a lot more to it than just raw frames, general smoothness and who even knows what other factors are involved.

      Luckily 144hz is an easy enough target to reach even at 1440p. I honestly don’t think there is too much to be gained beyond 144hz, but I’m certain that a trained eye can spot the difference, even if not by sight alone.

      Dropping down to 60 is honestly very annoying when playing unsupported games, it just doesn’t feel right. I’m spoiled by the tech these days I suppose.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 1 year ago

    That’s still a lot of money for a TN 1080p monitor.

      • morphine
      • 1 year ago

      Sorry you can’t see the rest of the spec sheet.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        Wrong person. Sorry bro.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      It’s really not, for a 240Hz panel and GSync from a top tier manufacturer.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 1 year ago

      When I was pricing monitors last year, G-Sync by itself seemed to add approximately $200 to a monitor’s cost.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Bro, this isn’t a 1080p 60hz Acer special. Are you a sanitation engineer, by chance?

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        I learned from my parents to take pride in my honest and hard work, and to appreciate other people’s work, no matter their station in life. It is a lesson I cherish every day.

        uni-mitation

          • Neutronbeam
          • 1 year ago

          You sir, [or madame] are a fine example of a human being for all of us.

          EDIT: [or madame]

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          I just asked a question, bro

          Srsly_bro

            • uni-mitation
            • 1 year ago

            You remind me of [url=http://www.storyit.com/Classics/Stories/boycriedwolf.htm<] the kid that cried wolf.[/url<] Then again, I love to be proven wrong so time is the only true sage. uni-mitation

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          I didn’t demean sanitation engineers. It is highly unlikely for a sanitation engineer to have the intellect of an electrical, chemical, mechanical engineer or similar. As a result of unlikeliness, a sanitation engineer may have less capacity to reason.

          It was your subconscious bias — similar to some people viewing different races — that assumed I was speaking down to sanitation engineers.

          Don’t assume my argument, bro.

          srsly_bro

      • cpucrust
      • 1 year ago

      Looks like consumers might finally have a high VRR TN 1080p monitor choice without the ~ $200 G-Sync tax.

      Two years ago, I chose FreeSync vs G-Sync since I didn’t want to pay the tax.

      “But, but, but, G-Sync is superior and requires a custom ASIC add in board and that cost MUST be passed onto the muppets!”

      As some wise TR sage mentioned recently on a variation of a certain companies slogan: “The way you are meant to be played” (citation needed)

      (I will get down thumbed for sure as an AMD fanboi, but I could not resist! And yes I own 5 nVidia video cards and 2 AMD video cards)

      • kylinblue
      • 1 year ago

      A typical TN 1080p monitor has 60Hz of refresh rate. Using your logic we are buying 4 of them at the price of $349. #WorthIt

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        A 27″ 2560×1440 IPS LCD monitor at 144 Hz has 1.78 times as many pixels, 0.60 times the refresh rate and 7.5 times better angled viewing. This is the sort of monitor that I consider to be quite decent for most tasks.

        While the 25″ 1920×1080 TN LCD monitor at 240 Hz is great for twitch gaming, it is specialized for only that use. The low-resolution TN panel is inferior for non-twitch gaming , for web browsing and for productivity tasks because it lacks resolution. It is inferior for photo editing and for casual video viewing because of the narrow viewing angle.

        I don’t play nearly as many twitch games as I do all of those other things with my PC.

          • Kretschmer
          • 1 year ago

          Hyper-specialized products often command a premium due to being engineered to excel at the bleeding edge in one field. Formula 1 cars lack cupholders and a terrible for lugging groceries, yet they are more expensive than a minivan.

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