VESA’s DisplayHDR Test software lets users double-check their monitors

When VESA announced its three-tiered DisplayHDR monitor certification program, the group promised it'd have a software utility for end users to check their displays' compliance with the standard by the end of Q2 2018. The outfit has delivered on that promise with this week's release of the DisplayHDR Test application for Windows 10. VESA's announcement says the tool works with “off the shelf calibration colorimeters,” but consumers will have to wait for the next update to get a list of colorimeters that meet the group's requirements for accuracy and tolerance. 

The initial release's operation is a bit cumbersome, requiring that users run a command-line program that outputs a set of test patterns to the screen. The user is then tasked with operating their colorimeter hardware and software to measure the screen output while VESA's utility runs. To get the final results, the user must then pass the output from the colorimeter's software through a second utility provided by VESA. The outfit says future versions of DisplayHDR Test may drive the sensor in the test tool and compute the results directly.

As a reminder, VESA's three DisplayHDR standards are based on the performance of difference luminance tests, two contrast tests, coverage of the BT.709 and DCI-P3 color spaces, color precision, and the speed of backlight's response to luminance changes.

So far, only about a dozen monitor models have earned DisplayHDR badging, and only a single display from Philips has reached the top-shelf DisplayHDR 1000 certification. Colorimeter owners can use VESA's DisplayHDR Test app to check and see where their displays measure up before making a decision on ponying up for a new screen. 

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    What?

    Wasn’t the whole point of DisplayHDR certification so that your average user could guarantee their monitor meets the claimed specs without having to go out and buy an expensive DCI-P3 colorimiter?

    I mean, I buy 80+ Gold PSUs because although I don’t have an oscilloscope and load-testing rig for PSUs, I know that the vendor has to submit samples to the 80+ consortium who then award the certification *if* it meets the standard.

      • EzioAs
      • 1 year ago

      I guess it means that this a tool for pros/reviewers to test monitors, especially since it requires the use of colorimeters which are not for the average person.

      Using your PSU argument, just because certain models have the 80+ Gold rating, it doesn’t mean that they hit it per standard. We still have independent reviewers to test whether the units hits or miss the standard.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Interesting, are there reviews where an 80+ certified PSU ever fails to reach its certification level?

          • EzioAs
          • 1 year ago

          Yes. It’s less common nowadays but it was not uncommon 7+ years ago. Look at reviews from JonnyGuru. It was very common for manufacturers to slap in 80+ Bronze or Silver and oversell their products even though they didn’t conform to the standard entirely. Corsair, with their initial HX series, was one of the first to change the rating from 80+Gold to 80+Silver simply because they thought the line didn’t do well enough. They were sort of underselling it at the time, and came out with the improved AX line later which did hit 80+Gold.

          Here are some reviews that I could find in a rather short period:

          [url<]http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story3&reid=241[/url<] [url<]http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story3&reid=205[/url<] [url<]http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story2&reid=188[/url<] Again, this was quite some time ago and platforms have increase tremendously since then but it shows that we still need to have independent reviews in order not to let manufacturers fool us with false ratings and certs.

    • psuedonymous
    • 1 year ago

    The tricky part is going to be finding rec.2020 colourimeters, existing sRGB devices are not suitable.

    • dyrdak
    • 1 year ago

    Windows store crApp. I’ll pass.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 1 year ago

    Rated E for umm Delta E!

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Echo?

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