Razer says Core X marks the spot for ultrabook graphics power

Razer's latest Blade laptop packs considerable gaming grunt into a svelte chassis, but sometimes gamers are willing to temporarily trade away an ultrabook's mobility in exchange for more pixel-pushing power. The Core X is the company's third take on the external graphics enclosure concept, and it promises additional refinement to the concept while dropping the required cash outlay.

The aluminum box can accommodate AMD and Nvidia graphics cards with triple-slot coolers and power demands up to 500 W. Razer says the graphics card installation requires no tools and that the connection to host laptops is plug-and-play. The enclosure measures 13″ long (33 cm), 2.4″ wide (6 cm), and 6.3″ high (16 cm). The Core X connects to the host PC using a USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 connection, but the USB and Ethernet connectors found on some other external graphics boxes were casualties in meeting the Core X's lower price point. The enclosure can send up to 100 W to the host laptop over the Thunderbolt 3 connection, at least.

Razer says the new Core X and the existing Core V2 external graphics enclosures are both now compatible with several of its own TB3-equipped laptop models as well as Macs and some third-party Windows laptops. Compatible PCs need Windows 10 with the Anniversary Update installed, and Macs must run the High Sierra version of the fruit-flavored operating system.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Razer's Core X external graphics box is the lower price. The company's existing Core V2 box costs $499, but the manufacturer was able to bring the cost of the Core X enclosure down to $299 with its 650-W power supply. Users will still need to supply their own TB3-equipped laptop and graphics card, a proposition that is thankfully looking easier as of late. The Core X is available right now at Razer's store.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    I’m trying to picture a 650-Watt GPU that doesn’t saturate a TB3 connection but am coming up blank. Still, cheaper is a step forward.

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah, but the missing ports are a step backward. They cut the cost by not making it a dock anymore.

        • DPete27
        • 1 year ago

        Isn’t USB and Ethernet just more data to clog up the [precious] pipe with?

      • Shobai
      • 1 year ago

      It sounds like you’re aiming too high; this is rated for 500W GPUs. +100W power delivery, +50W for the smarts ~=650W total.

        • DPete27
        • 1 year ago

        Keep in mind, the FE GTX 1080Ti only draws 250-270W

      • Pwnstar
      • 1 year ago

      You don’t stuff top-of-the-line GPUs in this thing. It’s limited by the TB3 connection.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 1 year ago

      Does anyone know what sort of ballpark card wouldn’t be constrained by a full 4-lane TB3 link?
      Is this directly relatable to GPU memory bandwidth, or anything like that?

    • Neutronbeam
    • 1 year ago

    Unexpected and welcome news to see Razor cutting its premium pricing on something.

    • nico1982
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]$299[/quote<] I was going to pull the trigger on a Sonnet 550, but I'm waiting for the reviews of the Razer.

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