Thursday deals: an Intel DC S3500 1.6-TB SSD for $315 and more

Morning, folks. Although I'm a normally a pretend guitarist, I've recently picked up bass guitar thanks to re-joining a band, and my left index finger is crying all the time about its blisters and general state of unhappiness. Who would've thunk that a 1/8″ string would be hard on the hands, eh? I can't rest though, and I still need to type. After all, there's PC hardware deals. Today's crop has a lot of storage in it, check it out.

  • We have a rather interesting SSD deal today for those particularly concerned about SSD reliability. The Intel DC S3500 1.6 TB is a SATA solid-state drive that can push up to 500 MB/s in sequential reads and 400 MB/s when writing. The unit can do 80 K IOPS both in reads and writes. What's so special about the drive, then? Well, it's a server-grade unit packing Intel's MLC NAND flash, and it's rated for a whopping 880 terabytes written. If you've ever wanted a capacious SSD that's likely to last you two lifetimes, this one is it. Grab it from Newgg for $315. That works out to 20 cents a gigabyte—not bad at all for gear of this grade.

  • How about a second deal on a huge solid-state drive? The unit in question is the Micron 1100 2-TB drive, well known to the TR gerbil population at large. The drive can push 530 MB/s for sequential reads and 500 MB/s when writing. Take one home for just $303.88 from Rakuten, a price that resolves into 15 cents per gigabyte.

  • We're interrupting the storage-deal programming to let you know about the Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Gaming 7-OP board-and-Optane package. The motherboard is a high-end Z370 offering with massive heatsinks, a feature list about a mile long, and a good helping of RGB LEDs. Newegg is currently bundling the slab o' circuits with a 32-GB Optane Memory cache module, all for the total sum of just $249.99. If you're building a high-end machine, this is a pretty enticing prospect.

  • Anyway, back to storage. Right here, we have two 4-TB external drives in slightly different varieties. The first one is the Seagate Backup Plus Hub 4-TB drive, a large 3.5″ external unit with an included USB hub and backup software—practical and perfect for sitting at a desk. You can have one of these for $89.99 from Newegg if you use the promo code 525HDSS3. If you'd rather have a drive that's easy to take with you, then you'll want the Western Digital Easystore 4 TB. This 2.5″ spinner is compact, capacious, and is selling for $89.99 at Best Buy.

  • We've saved the biggest deal for last, at least in the literal sense. The LG 34UB88-P is a humongous 34″ ultra-wide IPS display with a resolution of 3440×1440. The display ought to cover 99% of the sRGB color space, and it includes speakers, a USB hub, and a Thunderbolt 2 connector alongside HDMI and DisplayPort inputs. The price tag of $549.99 at Newegg is enticing enough, but if you fill out a rebate card, you can get another $100 back and bring the final tally down to $449.99. Crazy.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    That Micron 1100 2TB has been “on sale” for $280-$310 so many times in the past couple months, at what point to we just call this the regular price for that drive?

      • morphine
      • 1 year ago

      Probably around the time that said price stops floating and that the drive is available at other sellers.

    • mikepers
    • 1 year ago

    If you’re signed up for it, In the latest Newegg email there’s a $50 off code to get that monitor to $399 after the $100 gift card rebate.

    FYI, on the Intel SSD, it is being sold by a 3rd party seller and it looks like it’s an OEM HP drive.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    A good bass line will really stick with me and I’ll be humming it for all eternity. Unfortunately, good bass players are super hard to find. 😆

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      I can’t hum that low! LOL.

      Seriously, I hear you though. Whether it’s bass, guitar, keyboards, vocals, whatever, a good melody or riff will get stuck in my head big time. I find myself tapping out memorable percussion rhythms with my fingers too.

        • morphine
        • 1 year ago

        LOOOK AT MY HOOOORSE, MY HOOOORSE IS AMAAAAZIIINGGG

        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUl9_5kK9ts[/url<]

    • Shobai
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]my left index finger is crying[/quote<] There is a quick fix for that: play goofy

    • krazyredboy
    • 1 year ago

    I will say, after using both a flat, 29″ ultrawide screen and now a 34″ curved screen, that I find the curved screen to be substantially more comfortable. Not only that, but the curved version of that LG screen is currently, the same price at Amazon. The resolution difference notwithstanding, as my 29″ is only a 2560×1080 resolution and my 34″ is a 3440×1440, the problem I have with the 29″ screen is that I feel I struggle to look at the corners and sides. I have to physically move at times, just to read some content, so the comfort level of the curved screen is substantially better, as I do not make those same movements on the curved screen, even though it is physically larger and wider.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      That’s interesting. I’ve used both flat and curved 34 inchers and prefer flat, but that may be driven by specific tasks that I do (lining up items in Powerpoint is easier on a flat surface). Sadly, there are no flat gaming displays in that size class.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    Are Micron/Rakuten credible? That’s a really nice price.

      • Growler
      • 1 year ago

      [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micron_Technology<]Micron[/url<] has been around a long time. You're probably more familiar with a couple of brand names they use, Lexar and Crucial. In the 90s, they had made some sweet laptops. These days, they mostly stick to RAM, removal storage like SD cards, and SSDs. I'm not familiar with Rakuten, but they've been around for 20 years or so, apparently. They're big in Japan. 🙂

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      Micron has been around practically forever in tech terms. They direct-sell stuff under the Crucial name, supply components (DRAM and flash) to many other vendors, have partnered with Intel to develop bleeding edge flash and 3DXPoint memory tech, and were even a major (and well-respected) PC vendor back in the day (my old Micron Pentium Pro system is part of Starfalcon’s collection now).

      I’ve never heard of Rakuten. Sounds like they’re just some random reseller that has a good price on this SSD?

        • jihadjoe
        • 1 year ago

        Rakuten is like the Amazon+Newegg of Japan. They’ve been around since ’97.

        I’ve ordered a bunch of stuff from them, including a Pentium M laptop back in 2004 when I was in Yokohama. I had no idea they’d expanded out of Japan though.

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          I am willing to give them a chance. If they are expanding to the U.S market then great: more competition means better prices & service for us. I owe no allegiance to any brand except to my own bottom line.

          I will keep them in my bargain hunting when I occasionally buy stuff.

          uni-mitation

      • Evan
      • 1 year ago

      Micron makes excellent hardware, so any Micron product should be good.

      Edit: Thanks for the updates correcting me about Rakuten. My paragraph below should be ignored.

      On the other hand, for what it’s worth, my personal experiences with Buy.com (the previous name of Rakuten) were limited and happened a long time ago now, but both were bad. The first purchase I tried to make with them was a pair of USB speakers, and that was probably way back in 2003. For a year and a half, the order status was “sent to warehouse.” I eventually called to cancel the order, since it was obvious they were never going to ship those speakers to me. Years later, in 2007 or so, I tried ordering a DVD or Blu-ray set from them. Apparently, there had been some kind of price mistake, and it wasn’t only Buy.com that had it at that very low price, but within a day, they’d canceled the order on me, saying they’d made a mistake on the price. Maybe other vendors did the same thing with that set since they advertised similarly low prices, but how hard is it to post the correct price for an item and then honor it? I know these were small things and both happened over a decade ago, but they were enough that I didn’t want to waste my time attempting to buy anything from them again when there are other vendors I’ve never had a problem with.

        • UberGerbil
        • 1 year ago

        Raukuten wasn’t previously named Buy.com. Buy.com was an American ecommerce company that had its IPO right before the dot com bubble burst and got delisted not long after; its misadventures and poor customer service (which you experienced) led it (eventually) to being acquired by the (much larger) Japanese company Raukuten which rebranded it as Raukuten.com and made it its American arm. I have no idea how much of Buy.com remains behind the scenes, but I suspect very little after all this time. I have no direct experience with them but I wouldn’t assume your experience a decade ago is relevant anymore either.

      • gamoniac
      • 1 year ago

      Rakuten is definitely reputable. They bought over buy.com and I have shopped there once in a while since the early 2000’s (or even late 90’s).

    • The Egg
    • 1 year ago

    That 2TB would make a great games storage drive for folks with large libraries (I’m at about 1.2TB myself), but even at a great price, it’s hard to justify spending $300 on storage when I’m still stuck with a GTX970.

    I imagine plenty of others are still currently stuck with sub-optimal graphics cards.

      • not@home
      • 1 year ago

      My 7870 is getting old also, but now is not the time to upgrade it, considering the current market. However, now might be a good time to upgrade storage.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      Well, if your’re running at 1440P or 1080P the 970 is still a fine card. With games filling up 40-60+GB, I could totally see upgrading from a 256 or 128GB SSD before springing for a new GPU. Anything smaller than 512GB these days is quite a squeeze for gamers!

    • meerkt
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]Who would've thunk that a 1/8" string would be hard on the hands[/quote<] You can always change to a lighter gauge. 🙂

      • not@home
      • 1 year ago

      Actually lighter gauge strings have to be tentioned more to get in tune, resulting in pressing even harder on a smaller string. Getting a heavier gauge is easier on the fingers.

        • meerkt
        • 1 year ago

        But lighter strings also produce higher pitches. I think it’s just that the mass per length (μ in the sqrt(F/μ) of Mersenne’s laws) in heavier strings grows quicker than the stretching force (F).

        • morphine
        • 1 year ago

        Doesn’t work that way unless you’re also changing the tuning 🙂

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        Err… no. Physics says otherwise. Less vibrating mass means less tension required to get it to vibrate at a given frequency.

        Yeah, there’s still a tradeoff (pressing on a narrower string so the force is not as well distributed), but I’m too lazy to do the math to figure out whether that’s a net win or lose right now. I think it is a win, since the mass of the string increases with the square of its diameter.

          • meerkt
          • 1 year ago

          According to a precalculated table for D’Addario’s XL (Nickelplated Round Wound):

          [code<] diameter weight tension tension/diameter 105 .00198395 40.3 0.384 125 .00274810 55.8 0.446 [/code<] Tension is (lbs at E1 at 34" scale length). It disagrees with what the package says, BTW, but at least the relations should hold, I hope.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    Reasonable prices on Intel SSDs?

    THANKS AMD!

    • SecretMaster
    • 1 year ago

    Man I hope those SSD deals/prices are a sign of things to come. I’m maybe a year out from a new build, and I’d love to see 2TB SSD’s in the $300 ballpark. Tempting to jump on one of those two deals now, but I think I’ll wait it out a little while longer.

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