Friday night topic: Gas or charcoal?

As American gerbils head home for the Memorial Day weekend, many are no doubt preparing to honor our fallen service members. It's also time to engage in the time-honored tradition of grilling up a whole bunch of meat for friends and family. As we all head out to our patios and backyards to fire up the grill, the inevitable question is one of methods.

Taken just as I was writing this

Personally, I'm a charcoal guy. I prefer the higher peak heat levels, the smoky flavor, and the easy experimentation possible with direct and indirect heat from single-zone and dual-zone fires. There's also less to fail in a good old Weber kettle grill than in the relatively fussy mechanics of the typical gas grill. It's hard to beat the quality of the grilling experience available versus the price of entryโ€”just $150 or so for the 22″ Weber Premium on my back deck right now.

Of course, gas grills have their own advantages. It's a lot less involved to fire up a gas grill, and the set-it-and-forget-it lighting and preheating process is likely a boon for those who can't carefully attend a chimney full of coals until it's good and ready. It's less messy to hook up a propane canister every now and again than it is to crack open and dispense a bag of charcoal briquettes, too.

So what's your preferred method for getting a good sear on burgers and brats? Any tips and tricks you've honed over the years? Convince me that my preference is wrong or back me up in the comments. No matter what, I'm sure whatever comes off your grill is delicious.

Comments closed
    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    Horray to the return of Friday Night Topic!!!!!

    • mikepers
    • 1 year ago

    Wanted to say thanks for the memorial links to [url=https://techreport.com/news/33705/friday-night-topic-gas-or-charcoal?post=1079619<]emphy (#30)[/url<] and [url=https://techreport.com/news/33705/friday-night-topic-gas-or-charcoal?post=1079639<]G8torbyte (#43)[/url<] and for the article link to [url=https://techreport.com/news/33705/friday-night-topic-gas-or-charcoal?post=1079648<]just brew it! (#51)[/url<] On a side note I use a Weber gas grill. It's pretty convenient for the occasional grilling I do.

    • Anovoca
    • 1 year ago

    I prefer charcoal/wood grill but most of the time I end up using a cast iron pan to flash sear then broil. If I had to choose between cast iron method or propane grill I would probably stick to just using my cast iron. If I have a large group to cook for, the grill is obviously more efficient than cast iron; but for the majority of situations I am cooking for just my girl and myself and we have more than enough oven space for us to each build our own skillets with the meat and veggie portions we desire and broil them together.

    • Dposcorp
    • 1 year ago

    ……and zgirl was not consulted on this because…….?

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Coyote_ar
    • 1 year ago

    ideally … wood.
    if lazy and want it fast … charcoal.
    gas … i wouldnt dare using that to grill something.

    burn some wood or charcoal, have some nice embers. put some nice asado ribs over the grill and cook it at low heat for 2-3 hours.

    • Jigar
    • 1 year ago

    I know almost 99.9% haven’t used cow dung to cook food in US, but this things beat charcoal by miles and has been used by Indians villagers since centuries (Still used by many who don’t prefer electricity or gas burners)

    [url<]https://www.amazon.com/Cow-Dung-Cakes-Happiness-Overloaded/dp/B07CR1HJ24/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1527584280&sr=8-3&keywords=cow+dung[/url<]

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      There’s just something a little weird about using an animal’s own poop to cook it.

        • Captain Ned
        • 1 year ago

        Well, since dairy cows will gladly eat feed they’ve pooped on (dear Bob they’re dumb animals), it sorta closes the cosmic loop.

          • just brew it!
          • 1 year ago

          Dogs (even some fairly intelligent ones I’ve known) sometimes eat their own poop too.

            • Captain Ned
            • 1 year ago

            I’ve renamed the litter box to “Ollie’s Snack Bar”.

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            One of my daughter’s dogs will actually follow her other dog around the yard, in the hopes of getting some “fresh from the source”.

            • Anovoca
            • 1 year ago

            Really wish I wasn’t sitting here eating a big bowl of beef chili when I read that.

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            You’re welcome!

        • Jigar
        • 1 year ago

        LOL, that does sound weird and cows are considered sacred in India, so no one in India might have cooked beef using cow dung.

      • Pancake
      • 1 year ago

      Well, living in the first world has its advantages. One of those being not having to search for cow poop as a source of fuel because there’s nothing else available to provide the energy to break down lentils and rice into edible nutrients. But, making a virtue of it? That’s not the way to progress.

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        What’s more efficient and/or environmentally sound? Burning the poop directly, or using it to fertilize something else that you will eventually burn as fuel? I honestly don’t know.

        It’s entirely possible that there’s a case to be made for simply burning the poop.

          • Pancake
          • 1 year ago

          Burning poo isn’t going to be very good for your health especially as you would have to sit right next to the burning poo as you stir the pot or perform whatever cooking process. It’s not a clean burn. Then there would be wider air pollution consequences from millions of piles of poo being burnt. India has particularly bad issues with air quality.

          Then there’s all the methane released from decomposing piles of poo which is a particularly potent greenhouse gas.

          Enter technology: collect the poo, ferment it and use the methane to power clean gas stoves (perhaps at a communal facility). The waste product (poo poo) would be safe fertiliser for agricultural use. That’s progress and the application of science and knowledge. Or one could maintain that burning poo directly is part of one’s cultural heritage and if it was good enough for grandma (who died early from respiratory disease) it’s good enough today. And that food cooked on burning poo tastes better… o_O

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            [quote<]Then there's all the methane released from decomposing piles of poo which is a particularly potent greenhouse gas.[/quote<] So burn them before the methane is emitted? (Semi-serious, not sure if that's a net win or not.)

            • Pancake
            • 1 year ago

            Human beings are a uniquely creative animal. Some cultures have mastered a million uses for soybean or the coconut palm.

            In India cow poop is apparently an abundant resource and they do much more than burn it. They build houses out of it, use it as a form of render, medicine, insect repellent, dishwashing and teeth cleansers amongst many other uses. Fascinating, really. And to think the only use I have for it is to occasionally dig a bag or two into my vegie patches to boost organic content. Good stuff.

            [url<]https://trueayurveda.wordpress.com/2014/04/09/cow-dung-uses-and-used-for-centuries/[/url<]

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    Both.

    When I’m pressed for time (as is often the case) being able to just light our gas grill and plop some stuff on the grill is easy and fast and still pretty tasty.

    Charcoal grilling to me is very social. I’m much more likely to put some Kingsford into the Weber and wait for it to come up to temp when I’m standing around enjoying a Cold One with friends.

    I don’t think there’s a wrong way to grill, other than “not grilling”.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      Even if you’re just making a family meal, you can do some of the prep work while you’re waiting for the coals. For me, one of the harder to learn fine points of cooking has been how to interleave things efficiently (I’m still getting better).

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        That’s definitely true, but I’m talking about the nights where I have class and there are only 40 minutes to cook and eat. Most of the time that’s just a matter of setting down some chicken breasts the night before and letting them marinate for 24 hours in the fridge. At 4:30 I can light the grill and have the chicken cooked fully by 4:50. That gives just enough time to eat and get out the door by 5:10.

          • just brew it!
          • 1 year ago

          Points for attempting something like this with only 40 minutes to spare. That would probably be a “microwave some leftovers or eat some cheese and crackers” situation for me.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            During the winter that’s exactly what it is. Make a big pot of soup and eat it for 3-4 days. But when there’s a will, there’s a way. ๐Ÿ˜†

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          Or like many who have busy lives and workout daily, meal prep goes a long way. I usually cook for the week on Sundays and I’m set. Have you tried that?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            I know other people who do, I just haven’t.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    While we’re here, I’m doing beer brats this evening.
    There appear to be two major schools of thought on these. The first is to simmer the brats in beer first to do the cooking followed by searing to give them the right color. The other school of thought reverses that process with a sear followed by a simmer to finish cooking.

    Any strong opinions on technique?

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Simmer, then sear.

        • chuckula
        • 1 year ago

        That’s what I did… they turned out perfectly and the onions in the beer are a perfect topping.

    • JMccovery
    • 1 year ago

    Honestly, I like both. If I’m grilling and I want things done the way I like them, and am not impatient, I’ll use charcoal. If it’s for the kinds of people that couldn’t tell rubber from actual good meat, or I can’t wait long, I’d use propane, I tell you hwhat.

    I just like barbecue… At times, a little too much, though. As long as it tastes damn good, I don’t care what fuel source is used.

    • slushpuppy007
    • 1 year ago

    Think you should make this a poll:

    Charcoal
    Gas
    Wood
    Electric

      • YellaChicken
      • 1 year ago

      You forgot cheese.

      • WhatMeWorry
      • 1 year ago

      And Cow Dung.

    • shank15217
    • 1 year ago

    Come-on let’s be a little environment and health concious here, coal emits some nasty stuff when burning and with millions of households BBQing today will release a large amount of CO2 into the air. Use electric when possible and gas if that’s an option. Use wood chips with gas if you want the smoke flavor. Also cook in a large group, all BBQ is more efficient when people gather and use one large pit instead of their own personal BBQ grill.

      • krisirk
      • 1 year ago

      Charcoal isn’t coal. [url<]https://firecookeat.com/charcoal-vs-coal/[/url<]

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      Uhhh… charcoal for BBQ is not the same as the coal that gets mined out of the ground. It is made from wood. Renewable and carbon neutral.

      Gas (whether piped in natural gas or from a propane tank) is a fossil fuel.

      So you’ve got it backwards WRT net CO2 emissions.

        • shank15217
        • 1 year ago

        Saying charcoal is carbon neutral is BS.

          • just brew it!
          • 1 year ago

          How so? The carbon in the charcoal sold for BBQ use comes from wood which is grown for the purpose of making charcoal and/or waste from other wood-consuming industries. This is carbon-neutral since the carbon they release when burned was pulled from the atmosphere while the tree was growing.

          Propane and natural gas are fossil fuels; burning them releases carbon which has been trapped below ground for millions of years, affecting the overall long-term CO2 balance.

          If you’re referring to the carbon released by energy used to process and transport the charcoal, well that applies to fossil fuels as well, so you actually take a double hit on the fossil fuels.

          I’ll grant you that gas/propane produce less particulate matter (soot) when burned, but you seem to be specifically focusing on CO2.

            • shank15217
            • 1 year ago

            The amount of energy put into making a bag of charcoal or coal or any other combustible resource is much higher than the energy output. The only true carbon neutral energy sources are geothermal, hydroelectric, solar and wind due to their massive power output compared to what it costs to create them.

            • Captain Ned
            • 1 year ago

            You left one source out of your “true carbon neutral” list. Nuclear. I’m sure it’s because you deem it beyond the pale. That said, if you want 100% carbon-free electricity generation, we already know how to build ’em. We just need to streamline the process.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 1 year ago

            There is a certain amount of secondary pollution implied when spending money, and I suspect the very high costs associated with nuke power these days implies that the whole enterprise is rather inefficient with resources. In light of that argument, I’m not overly impressed by the claim that nukes are carbon neutral.

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            Even if true, this still does not explain why you recommended gas/propane (fossil fuels) over charcoal produced from wood.

            You also continue to equate “charcoal” with “coal”, when they are very different things, with very different production processes and environmental impacts.

            • Coyote_ar
            • 1 year ago

            you arent getting it … its carbon neutral.

            all the CARBON, in the plant that created the charcoal. came from the atmosphere. when you return that CARBON to the atmosphere … the total count is 0 … hence neutral.

            BTW …. creating charcoal is powered by solar energy. photosynthesis ever heard of it?

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 1 year ago

            If I were to criticize the impact of charcoal it would be the unclean burning.

            • jihadjoe
            • 1 year ago

            By that logic oil from the middle east is carbon neutral, maybe even carbon negative. It literally gushes out from the ground, providing massive power output compared to what it costs to extract.

            • Duct Tape Dude
            • 1 year ago

            [quote<]This is carbon-neutral since the carbon they release when burned was pulled from the atmosphere while the tree was growing.[/quote<]By this argument, fossil fuels are also carbon neutral.

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            It’s a matter of timeframe. Atmospheric CO2 levels were much, much higher, and the climate was massively different, millions of years ago when the carbon in our fossil fuels was originally captured. Returning to that baseline over the course of just a few decades (versus a more gradual change over centuries or millennia) runs a significant risk of stressing (if not overwhelming) the ability of the biosphere and human civilization to adapt.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      Your ignorance is showing.

        • shank15217
        • 1 year ago

        Which part? I guess all that burning fuel and lighter fluid adds nothing to the atmosphere. I suppose the sheer scale of millions of households doing it on the same day has no impact either, typical American ignorance.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 1 year ago

          You were talking about coal.

          • just brew it!
          • 1 year ago

          As has been pointed out already, the carbon added to the atmosphere by burning charcoal was pulled from the atmosphere recently by the trees which were grown to produce the charcoal. Sure, you’re adding some CO2 locally, but it was pulled from the atmosphere where the wood was grown. Unlike natural gas, propane, or mined coal, charcoal is a renewable and (mostly) carbon-neutral fuel.

          Anyone with a clue isn’t using lighter fluid to start their grill; it makes the food taste nasty, and (as you’ve alluded to) it is contributing CO2 to the atmosphere from fossil fuels. I agree, lighter fluid is bad.

          Yes, I’ll concede that grilling makes a small contribution to overall particulate pollution. This is going to be the case regardless of the heat source though; most of the smoke comes the burning fat that drips off the meat (and smoking chips/pellets, if used), not the charcoal.

          Rather ironic that you accuse others of ignorance, considering…

      • jensend
      • 1 year ago

      When you’re talking about generating heat, electric is not particularly an environmentally friendly way to go.

      We deal with high conversion losses in turning other forms of energy into pure, easy to use, low-entropy electrical energy. To compensate, per the 2nd law of thermodynamics, entropy has to rise elsewhere. Usually that’s in the form of lots of waste heat. Then there are transmission and conversion losses to take that energy and get it to you.

      Using electricity directly to warm things is taking the end result, pure usable low entropy energy delivered to your home at great cost, and throwing it away as maximum-entropy heat. Using a space heater is generally worse than burning coal.

      When feasible, using the electricity to do the useful work of running a heat pump (pulling in heat from the environment, an AC/fridge in reverse) is usually vastly more efficient (3x-5x!) than just throwing the electricity away as heat. AFAIK few have tried to make heat pumps for cooking.

      Cf [url=https://www.ornl.gov/news/fourth-july-no-picnic-nations-environment<]this ORNL pr release[/url<]: [quote<]A liquefied petroleum gas grill operated for an hour would emit 5.6 pounds of carbon dioxide while a charcoal grill would emit about 11 pounds. An electric grill would account for about 15 pounds of carbon dioxide.[/quote<]

        • Captain Ned
        • 1 year ago

        [quote<]Cf [url=https://www.ornl.gov/news/fourth-july-no-picnic-nations-environment<]this ORNL pr release[/url<]: A liquefied petroleum gas grill operated for an hour would emit 5.6 pounds of carbon dioxide while a charcoal grill would emit about 11 pounds. An electric grill would account for about 15 pounds of carbon dioxide.[/quote<] And that 11 pounds of CO[sub<]2[/sub<] was recently removed from the environment whereas the CO[sub<]2[/sub<] from the LP was pulled out at least 65 million years ago.

    • fyo
    • 1 year ago

    Gas, for the simple reason that we actually started using the grill once we got a gas grill. Prior to that, our charcoal grill basically never saw any use. I still have some charcoal bricks somewhere…

    The (Weber) gas grill is just so easy and fast to use, it’s a joy. The time, mess, and hassle of a charcoal grill just wasn’t worth it.

    • Zizy
    • 1 year ago

    Neither actually.
    Wood for taste, electric for convenience.

    • Pancake
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal, ammo and ice.

    • not@home
    • 1 year ago

    I have never used a gas grill or a charcoal grill. I have however used the fire pit with an adjustable tripod thousands of times.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal.

    My dad got me a really cool adapter kit for my Weber kettle (which he also got me a few years earlier, we love BBQ and all the gift opportunities it affords ๐Ÿ™‚ for Christmas a couple of years ago. Is a grill with a circular insert you can take out of the center and replace with a variety of different cooking implements — he got me a large Wok and a ceramic steak-cooking grill along with a pizza stone.

    The ceramic grill holds heat a lot longer than its metal counterparts, so you can cook as many steaks as you like on it and it always puts those delicious charred criscross marks on the steaks. The wok cooks a large amount of stir-fry or whatever you like/is a lot bigger than the average stovetop wok. The main grill also has 2 flip-up sides that let you get to the coals underneath to add wood/rearrange the coals, etc.

    He also got me 2 metal cauldrons/coal holders, it’s easy to put these on either side of the grill so you have a large area of indirect heat in the middle, or directly under the steak grill, or anywhere you please. They’re very handy because they keep the coals nicely stacked and you can move half of your briquettes with tongs or a large fork/spoon for just by pushing it around.

    I love Hank Hill but I bet my BBQ is better than his. ๐Ÿ˜›

    • meh
    • 1 year ago

    Wood Pellet Grill – final answer.

    About sever years ago, I bought my first house. Having grown up with gas, I was tired of tasteless grilling. I went to buy a simple $65 charcoal weber, as pictured actually.

    Then I saw a sign reading “3-minute chicken”.

    I walked out with a $1’000 wood pellet grill, starting with the letter “T”.

    Charcoal is wonderful, but 100% indirect burning wood is the world’s all-time best flavour. And your wood becomes another ingredient — mesquite, hickory, apple, oak, cherry, and more.

    Here’s the best part. It operates like gas.

    Flip a switch, and an electric worm-gear transports the wood pellets from the hopper into the firepot, where an electric igniter starts the fire (for the first few minutes), and an electric fan (think pc fan) keeps the fire well oxygenated. A knob sets the speed of the worm-gear, an hence the amount of wood being burned, and hence the temperature of the fire, from ~50F to 450F (for seriously hard woods).

    It’s easy, it’s simple, it’s slow, it’s fantastic.

    3-minute chicken? One minute to season the chicken, one minute to put the chicken onto the grill/smoker, one minute to take it off. In the meantime, go watch the game with your buddies, you don’t need to stand over your chicken for an hour. It won’t burn, it won’t get dry, you don’t need to worry about it at all.

    Final tip? Beat the living hell out of your chicken when you marinate it. I mean bone-breaking balboa beatings, followed by the most erotic massage you’ve ever given. You should feel equally guilty if anyone walks in on you during either stage. Trust me.

    • PBCrunch
    • 1 year ago

    We have a natural gas line leading out under our deck right to the grill. It was pretty simple to remove the jets on the burners and replace the gas line in order to convert the grill from liquid propane to natural gas.

    All of you saying that lump charcoal is barely any more work than LP tanks have never experienced the joy of underground natural gas delivery from the utility company. I never have to change tanks or buy coals or anything. I can grill any time I want with no concern for materials.

    Better yet, my smoker is natural gas-fueled as well. I just put in chips for 3-4 hours and then move things into a slow cooker for long enough to liquefy all the collagen in pulled pork and ribs. When I want to smoke some fish I just turn the gas flow down and enjoy perfectly cold-smoked salmon or trout.

    I even converted a turkey fryer setup to boil my 10-gallon pot when I brew beer. My gas stove doesn’t have the cojones to bring five gallons of wort to a boil, but the re-jetted turkey fryer setup does it with no hesitation, and I never have to worry about running out of coals or propane halfway through a 90-minute IPA boiling session.

    Charcoal is 5% better for 80% more work. I’d just as soon save that time for hanging out with my wife or cutting apart some totally-working piece of electronics hoping to make it work a little bit more the way I want it to.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]I even converted a turkey fryer setup to boil my 10-gallon pot when I brew beer. My gas stove doesn't have the cojones to bring five gallons of wort to a boil, but the re-jetted turkey fryer setup does it with no hesitation, and I never have to worry about running out of coals or propane halfway through a 90-minute IPA boiling session.[/quote<] When we replaced our stove a few years back, we got one that had sufficient oomph to boil a 5 gallon batch. We all like to cook, and my wife had also taken up home brewing, so it was a no-brainer to get a stove that had a high-output burner on it. [quote<]I'd just as soon save that time for hanging out with my wife or cutting apart some totally-working piece of electronics hoping to make it work a little bit more the way I want it to.[/quote<] [url<]https://xkcd.com/1994/[/url<]

    • prb123
    • 1 year ago

    The best grill is the one you actually use. I’ve cooked some amazing food on both charcoal and gas. I love me some charcoal in the Summer on a lazy weekend, but really like using my gas grill at the end of my garage in the rain and snow.

    • James296
    • 1 year ago

    personally prefer gas for 1. ease of use and 2. convenience. as far as taste goes, open pit wood fire.

    • Klopsik206
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal for the taste
    Gas for conveniece

    How about electricity. Are electric grills a thing in US?

      • Fonbu
      • 1 year ago

      Gas and Charcoal are banned in a few large metroplitan areas and electric is the only option. Unless you have a solar cooker, or live with geothermal vents.

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        Ahh, I was not aware of this. Remind me to never move to one of those areas.

        Edit: Both because I want to use my charcoal and propane, and because I don’t want to live anywhere that I’m surrounded by people so stupid that the authorities feel a need to protect the populace from charcoal and propane.

          • Wall Street
          • 1 year ago

          It isn’t that the people are so stupid that they need to be protected from charcoal and propane. It is that there is no place for charcoal and propane on a high-rise balcony or rooftop. I live in NYC and the city is fine allowing you to grill in the park, but grilling on the rooftop or a balcony is a no-go for the obvious fire safety reasons. You are above where a ladder fire truck can reach and the building’s fire prevention sprinkler system doesn’t have sprinkler heads in the outdoor balcony/roof areas. An accident could send flaming embers down the side of the building and onto the street.

          On top of this, buildings with courtyards generally frown upon grilling because one grill can smell up dozens of apartments.

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            That makes sense, at least for the charcoal. Propane really shouldn’t be much of a risk on a balcony though.

        • Zizy
        • 1 year ago

        I easily understand charcoal ban in areas striving to have low air pollution, I presume all wood-burning is banned too.
        But why ban gas? It is clean enough and safe enough, unless you really screw up.

    • Freon
    • 1 year ago

    Cast iron pan.

      • Chuckaluphagus
      • 1 year ago

      Cast iron pan on the grill! I have a Weber gas grill (prefer charcoal, but not enough to trade off speed and ease of use), and have taken to caramelizing onions in a small cast iron skillet on the top rack of the grill as it heats and cooks. Once they’re starting to brown at the edges, splash with good beer and stir altogether. They’re done right around the same time your brats/hot dogs/burger are. It’s so dead easy and simple, I’ve taken to caramelizing onions nearly every time I use the grill.

    • anotherengineer
    • 1 year ago

    “Personally, I’m a charcoal guy. I prefer the higher peak heat levels”

    If it’s higher peak heat levels, may I suggest gas.

    [url<]http://mifco.com/foundry-furnaces/high-speed-melters/[/url<] ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • nerdrage
    • 1 year ago

    While I prefer the taste of charcoal (assuming that there’s no lighter fluid involved), the convenience of my natural gas Weber wins out. It’s ready almost immediately, dead simple and quick to clean, and I don’t even have to deal with tank replacement. I can (and do) use it year-round, even if that means I have to shovel a path to it in the winter.

    • setaG_lliB
    • 1 year ago

    Err, I use an electric grill. At 1650w, it puts out about a tenth of the heat a 60K BTU gas grill generates, but hey–it keeps the two of us fairly small people fed!

    • firewired
    • 1 year ago

    I use an Intel Prescott CPU to light the coals, and an NVIDIA FX 5800 Ultra to achieve two goals:

    1. Maintain High Heat, to cook the food evenly.
    2. High Speed Fan to keep the coals glowing.

    Kidding aside, I prefer to use coal for grilling but sadly do not have (or do not want to make) time for using it. So I use a propane gas grill as a compromise. Generally I just want the food cooked as quickly as possible so I can enjoy it with as little preparation and cleanup time needed.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      A dissenting view: If I’m taking the trouble to prepare a home-cooked family meal in the first place (as opposed to just ordering carry out or nuking something), I might as well “do it right”. Fresh veggies from the produce market, marinades from scratch, etc.

      TBH if I’m just looking for a quick meal for myself, I’ll go 180 degrees the other way, and open up a pack of ramen. But it’s gotta be the good spicy Korean stuff, and there has to be some fresh veggies (mushrooms, green onions, whatever else we’ve got in the fridge), and a protein (tofu, or an egg) added.

      • the
      • 1 year ago

      [url=https://youtu.be/veALz35LV9U?t=25s<]Pasta[/url<] [url=https://youtu.be/buPs-BYnY20?t=9m4s<]Popcorn[/url<] [url=https://youtu.be/7uBNCN6v_gk?t=1m28s<]Bologna[/url<] Bonus: [url=https://youtu.be/OsQDTB3Na2M?t=2m21s<]Eggs via triple GTX 580 SLI (head phone warning)[/url<] The bigger issue for CPU cooking isn't the amount of energy to do it but rather getting distributed evenly onto a good cooking surface. Motherboards aren't known to have much free area around a CPU where a pot/skillet/pan could be placed. This is especially true in modern systems with integrated memory controllers as DIMM slots tend to get in the way. Old school dual Netburst based Xeons would be ideal for cooking using a server motherboard. Lots of power there with relatively short VRM's around the processor socket to fit into a server chassis. Probably would still need a short copper shim but it'd be doable. For something more modern, the best candidate is oddly the Intel Hades Canyon NUC. You get both a CPU and GPU to heat up a cooking surface with a simple shim to get over the MOSFETs. DIMMs and physical ports etc are all on the other side of the board. The real problem is getting enough power into the NUC for overclocking it to really put out energy. On the other end of the computing spectrum which would be good for cooking would be some Tesla V100 based HPC systems. The mezzanine cards the GV100 chips com one are relatively flat, provide good area and could produce up to 300W per mezzanine card. Oh, and there are systems with upward of 8 of those for 2.4 kW of power that could go towards cooking. You'd also be crazy-stupid to give it a try though.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Flame thrower.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      Speaking of which… any plans to overclock the fire pit at the BBQ this year?

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        Already overclocked. Thought twice about using liquid nitro though because.. it would be counterproductive. Thanks. ๐Ÿ™‚

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Lol +1

    • just brew it!
    • 1 year ago

    On a related topic, I’ve started playing around with smoking stuff. I have a Weber grill, and have been using one of [url<]http://thesmokinwedgie.com/[/url<] these to hold the pellets. The issue I've been having is that the pellets keep going out; I'm led to believe that this is because they don't get sufficient oxygen in a Weber to keep them lit. If anyone else has dealt with a similar issue, I'm interested in hearing your suggestions.

    • just brew it!
    • 1 year ago

    I’ve always been a charcoal guy, and always use a chimney to start. Charcoal lighter fluid makes the food taste like an oil well fire.

    Propane is for firing up the big brew kettle.

    • mattshwink
    • 1 year ago

    Gas! I can’t taste that much of a difference (though we don’t cook much red meat, mostly chicken that has been marinated). We are now having the patio redone, and after talking with a couple of contractors have convinced my wife that the built-in fire pit will be Natural Gas, as well as an 8 foot outdoor kitchen. No more propane tanks (except for the patio heater in April and October).

    • sweatshopking
    • 1 year ago

    depends what restaurant i’m at

    joking. I usually use propane since they’re generally cheaper around here. I do think charcoal tastes better, but i’m usually too busy to put in the extra cleanup and organizing

      • Pville_Piper
      • 1 year ago

      It’s not really that bad. I put the charcoal on the Cajun cooker and it’s ready in about 5 minutes during which time I’ll clean the grill and do final prep work on the food. put the charcoal in the grill and spread it around and put the grate on. In about 5 more minutes I’ll oil the grill and put the meat on. When I remove the meat, steaks need to stand for five minutes so during that time I’ll clean and oil the grill and shut it down.

      The cleaning on both ends only takes a minute and the grill won’t rust between weekends if you’ve been oiling it regularly after use. In fact, last winter, it sat for a few months and had hardly any rust at all. Clean up for the first run only took a little longer than normal.

    • Pville_Piper
    • 1 year ago

    Lump charcoal in my Webber… I can cook steaks better than the restaurants.

    And I don’t use lighter fluid. I put my charcoal filled chimney on a propane Cajun cooker and the coals are ready in no time without the nastiness of lighter fluid.

    Pro tip for nubes, forget brushes, clean your grate with a coil of stainless steel pot scrubber (looks like steel wool) before cooking, then oil the grate when it’s hot and ready for the food. When you’re done, clean it again, oil it and then shut off the vents. The grate will get seasoned like a cast iron pan and won’t rust and, if you’re using lump charcoal, you will have plenty of left over charcoal to start with next time. Put the used charcoal in your chimney and top it off with fresh charcoal and you’re ready to roll!

    • emphy
    • 1 year ago

    If you happen to be the Netherlands, the place to be to honor fallen US service members is the [i<]Netherlands American Cemetery[/i<] at Margraten: [url<]https://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries-memorials/europe/netherlands-american-cemetery#.Wwk8r-aYMRZ[/url<] Note that this year the ceremony is held on Sunday, the 27th.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      That’s very cool. I had no idea that we had memorials like that in any other country, much less the Netherlands. Big respect to our friends in the low countries.

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        IIRC France and other countries have similar memorials.

        As our demographics shift, and the generation that actually fought in WWII passes into memory, it is easy to forget that it wasn’t just about that grandparent or great-uncle who fought (and in many cases died) in the war. We had a huge and lasting impact in Europe.

        I read this a while back, and I teared up a little. Heck, I’m tearing up again:
        [url<]http://thecourier.com/life-news/life-extra/2018/03/26/74-years-later-wwii-pilot-who-crashed-in-france-returns-home-ap-video/[/url<]

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 1 year ago

        Japan has a similar memorial with cards is all those who died in Japan in WWII. The mindset of USA personnel is amazing compared to the other countries..

      • G8torbyte
      • 1 year ago

      Thank you Emphy, if I’m ever back in Europe I’d like to visit it. I was stationed in the UK with the USAF some years ago and was able to visit the St. Laurent Cemetery in Normandy, France. It was an experience I’ll never forget.
      [url<]https://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries-memorials/europe/normandy-american-cemetery#.WwmbKEgvxjE[/url<]

      • ronch
      • 1 year ago

      Speaking of the Netherlands, what is your opinion on Mars One? ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Firestarter
    • 1 year ago

    definitely a charcoal guy if it’s someone else’s grillparty, but I’m too lazy for the cleanup and I got a gas grill as a present

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Wood charcoal, but I’m normally camping and the wood fire, once it’s died down a bit is my preference.

    I go out of my way to make sure that there’s no coal in the charcoal, if I’m buying for a BBQ and there’s hope of finding some.

    • moose17145
    • 1 year ago

    Where is the option for “I live like a bachelor, therefore, I choose Microwave”

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      “Intolerance is the only appropriate reaction to heresy.”

        • jensend
        • 1 year ago

        username checks out

          • YellaChicken
          • 1 year ago

          Front page ahoy!

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      Wut? That just means you don’t have to put up with a picky wife like I do who only lets me grill SOME of the time!

      • ronch
      • 1 year ago

      What microwave? When I was a bachelor I’d eat a burger straight from the fridge.

      Edit – Ooohhh waaaiitt.. I STILL do that these days.

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        Actual question my youngest daughter (who was in her mid teens at the time) asked several years ago: “Do you think it would it be OK if I just thaw out this frozen burger patty and eat it raw?”

        My reply was something along the lines of: “I wouldn’t recommend it, but I’m not going to tell you not to, since the fact that you’re asking means you’re probably going to do it anyway. Don’t blame me if you get sick.”

        This from the daughter who on her 18th birthday proclaimed that she was getting a tattoo and joining the local Roller Derby league.

          • auxy
          • 1 year ago

          Your daughter sounds awesome! [s<]Is she single?[/s<] [super<][i<]muffled thumping as auxy is dragged away by her wife[/i<][/super<]

            • Pville_Piper
            • 1 year ago

            and the obligatory… [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnERqIVPcWM[/url<]

            • Wonders
            • 1 year ago

            Update: Not obligatory!

            • ronch
            • 1 year ago

            Okaaaayyyyy…. .. ….. …. . ..

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 1 year ago

            Lmao. Auxy, you’re on my fav list.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 1 year ago

            This is particularly amusing for me as I have watched her wife [b<]literally[/b<] drag her away.

        • Cuhulin
        • 1 year ago

        I find them a little too firm when I take them from the freezer, so a few minutes in the Foreman gets the job done.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      Bachelors should eat tasty food, too.

    • Mikael33
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal grill, with lump charcoal preferably
    I use a Lodge Sportsman grill, works great for my needs, downside would be cleaning the grates.
    Steaks on grill: [url<]https://i.imgur.com/69RNQLC.jpg[/url<]

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 1 year ago

    Taste the meat, not the heat.

    I learned what I know about grilling from the great Hank Hill of Strickland Propane.

    I really don’t grill for health reasons. I normally bake food on low to medium temps.

    And before I ruin the summer fun and receive red herrings (not for grilling), here is this.

    [url<]https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/cooked-meats-fact-sheet[/url<] If you grill frequently or are a health conscious person, be wary of the dangers.

      • brucethemoose
      • 1 year ago

      You’re half right. Far too many people I know char stuff to oblivion on the grill.

      However, if you’ve never smoked food before (slow and low heat), you’re missing out. And that type of grilling doesn’t give you cancer IIRC.

      • uni-mitation
      • 1 year ago

      That is an unpersuasive source. There is no direct relationship found in any reputable study where we may say that a certain threshold of say X amount of grilled meat for a certain amount of time increases your risk for cancer. There is no sample distribution, and no researcher has ever claimed that.

      What these studies’ conclusion say is that yes, HCAs and PAHs are known carcinogens. That is undisputed. What is in dispute and still being actively researched is a well-established link in the consumption of grilled, barbecued, etc meats & cancer diagnoses at least solely attributable to that behavior.

      It is the default & reasonable conclusion that consuming grilled meats is not as big of an epidemiological factor due to the small concentration of these carcinogens consumed as compared to lifestyle choices & other factors. This is akin to being vegan but being a total sugar addict. The only reasonable scientific recommendation is to eat these meats in moderation, and care more for other factors that affect your risk of cancer. The roasting of coffee in high temperatures also create small concentrations of known carcinogens. I still enjoy my instant coffee as I still have no reputable falsifiable study that says otherwise.

      I think [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9CxN6wSLa0<] potholer's[/url<] take on this is apropos. The California carcinogen warning law is one of those laws crafted with ill-informed scientific understanding. I would rather be governed by people that take an informed view of what they are crafting as law: rules of behavior for all of us. /rant This is the same reason that every news announcement of a new study is misleading and devoid of any nuance. The producers, the writers, and the reporters are for the most part unable to read one scientific study and be able to understand & synthesize the studies' conclusions or at least be a reputable source of scrutiny of it! They don't even care to have people with credentials & experience in the appropriate fields actually talk about the studies because it is boring, and doesn't bring clicks & views to them. So the reporting of anything scientific is severely handicapped due to the captive audience possessing at best an elementary understanding of science after high-school which goes to show the abject failure that is our education system, in my opinion. New day, new bold claim parroted by the news media: Elon Musk will cure cancer! Yay! Of course he will! /rant uni-mitation

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        Yes, the same is true with high levels of sodium consumption directly linked to hypertension. The advice is to consume less because we cannot eliminate sodium from our diets.

        The evidence here may not show a direct causal link between between grilled foods at high temps and cancer, but their are alternatives to grilling that may be healthier. Moderation is the the goal and elimination is a better choice, if reasonable.

        Your rant seems misdirected. I feel there is something else going on with you.

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          [quote<] Your rant seems misdirected. I feel there is something else going on with you. [/quote<] I look forward to my FBI profile. In all seriousness, I think it is best to bring to the foreground the more dangerous behaviors to avoid before other less proven ones. I think this is how public policy should be implemented. I do thank you for bringing the point though. It gave me the chance to serve as your counter-point. uni-mitation

        • MOSFET
        • 1 year ago

        “I still enjoy my instant coffee”

        That just unwrote the smart things you’ve written in the past. Just Brew It damnit

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          I didn’t know that you were the coffee police. I will gladly take the compliment though: you thought I was smart, yet failed to see that I was smarter to be proud to be myself and enjoy my coffee!

          There is no point in pleasing people who fail to value your contributions. And that’s a gem that life teaches you when you are in real need of a friend. Take your friends & close ones with all of their defects. Appreciate yourself, and maybe people will start to get what a great deal you really are. The Leopard does not change its spots.

          uni-mitation

        • designerfx
        • 1 year ago

        Eating animal protein already increases risk of cancer, drastically. There are a number of studies on that. Then there are studies warning about straight up carcinogens from grilled food – not specific to meat. It’s not unreasonable to expect them to be correlated on some level, even if it’s not causation.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      I don’t grill particularly frequently. I figure it’s just one more of those little things I enjoy in moderation, which (statistically speaking) may be taking a few weeks off my life. It’s pretty far down on my list of concerns, TBH.

      We’re all gonna die of something eventually. If I obsess about the (alleged and small in any case) increase in cancer risk from eating grilled food, I’ll probably end up dying in a car accident or flu epidemic instead; then the joke will be on me since I will have needlessly deprived myself of the pleasure of eating stuff I like.

      OTOH, I have started watching my red meat intake pretty closely of late, as I’ve discovered I’m now susceptible to gout. A gout attack causes a lot of pain and inconvenience in the here-and-now, as opposed to some hypothetical month off the end of my life when I’ll probably be old and senile anyway. Good thing grilled fish and chicken (and the occasional pork… shhh!) can be really good too.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        Indeed. I respect your opinion and you. Who knows if it’s a month? Could be more, could be less. I’m not sure it fair to make up a time frame then use that as a basis if an argument.
        That’s circular logic, bro.

        It’s true we’re all going to die someday.

          • just brew it!
          • 1 year ago

          As far as diseases like cancer go, it mostly comes down to genetics. Either you win the genetic lottery or you don’t. Or maybe you have the misfortune to grow up near Superfund site, and the early exposure has stacked the deck against you.

          Unless you’re a smoker, abusing alcohol or opiates, grossly overweight, or engaging in other overtly life-threatening behavior, when we die is mostly just genetics and dumb luck.

          IMO people would live less stressful happier lives if they stopped worrying about the little stuff.

            • christos_thski
            • 1 year ago

            That’s not completely true, genetic factors play a huge part even in whether smoking will give you cancer. It’s just become socially unacceptable to smoke so people center on the behavioural causal link rather than other catalysts. That’s NOT to dispute that ,of course, smoking WILL increase your chances of cancer manyfold, even without a genetic predisposition. It’s not like all smokers will die due to lung cancer, though. Not even close.

            By the way, lest I be misunderstood (as it’s almost taboo nowadays). I’m not suggesting people pick up on smoking because genetics play a big part in that particular habit’s results, just as well as most others’. Neither am I saying that people might as well live unhealthy lives because, in the end, it’s mostly pure genetics.

            It IS mostly just genetics, but we do what we can about the -let’s say 30%- chance we have of making a dent into living longer, healthier lives. ๐Ÿ™‚

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            I did say “mostly”. ๐Ÿ˜‰

            We’re all just playing the odds. I don’t smoke (never have), but I do drink. I have an aunt on my father’s side who has made it to 100 (and counting), and my father is approaching 90; so I figure I’ve got genetics on my side, at least on that side of the family.

      • Coyote_ar
      • 1 year ago

      you people in the US just like to burn stuff to a flame and call it cooking.

      try just using the embers to cook, take your time, say 1-2 hours. then you will have healthier and tastier grilled meats.

        • just brew it!
        • 1 year ago

        That’s part of the point of the popular Weber grill. You can partially close the vents to reduce the heat level and/or push all the fuel up against one side to use indirect heat. I did some smoked steelhead and smoked hard-boiled eggs that way this past weekend. Both turned out really good.

    • ludi
    • 1 year ago

    Gas, both us and my folks. They have a covered patio out back, and our townhome has an open patio that’s very small enclosed by a 6′ cedar privacy fence, and in either case an open flame is no good. Gas doesn’t impart as much flavor unless you run a smoker box inside, but the maintenance and safety issues make it the right solution for us.

    • Welch
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal or bust.

    Anyone who says gas is better has dead taste buds. If you want to start a charcoal grill it’s the easiest thing WITHOUT lighter fluid.

    Take a piece of paper towel a little wider than the base of your charcoals. Then pour the cheapest vegetable oil you can find on the paper towel to soak the majority of the surface and leave about a 1 inch border of the paper towel without oil on it. Pile your coals on top of that oiled paper towel and light in a few spots around it. Walk away.

    It acts as a wick and thoroughly lights all the coals every time. So. Much. Winning.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      This is my method too.
      First of all, your food doesn’t taste of petrol, and for seconds – everyone already brings paper towels and <insert edible food oil of choice> to a barbeque.

      • just brew it!
      • 1 year ago

      I’ll have to remember this trick the next time we go camping (assuming we ever do, we pretty much stopped after the kids were grown). Hauling a charcoal chimney around takes up valuable space in the vehicle.

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      Will try this weekend!
      At my old place i never needed lighter fluid because there was so much tinder & kindling I could just start a regular fire and add the charcoal. The new place is in an empty field without any of that available so avoiding lighter fluid would be sweet.

    • uni-mitation
    • 1 year ago

    It doesn’t matter. I wish everyone a happy memorial weekend though. I would proffer one point: don’t ever let those slimy marketeers convince you that this holiday is about stuffing your face in. At the end of the day, naked consumerism ends up consuming you whole. Consumerism isn’t the way to deal with your other emotional & biological needs that we need to be healthy as primates. You either end being owner of your things or they end up owning you. Only consume to live, don’t end up being another hamster in this world of debt & slavery.

    Enjoy your life, your friends, your family, health, and your liberties as Americans; count your blessing that for the balance of recorded history you are part of the lucky few that get to sleep in safe shelter from the ravages of war & famine while some have given their ultimate sacrifice to guard those gates. Let’s hope that peace & providence continue to guide us. AMEN!

    uni-mitation

      • Wonders
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]some have given their ultimate sacrifice[/quote<] True, but what does that have to do with... OHHHHHHHHHH

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      One way to help out is to find your local chapter of the [url=https://www.honorflight.org/<]Honor Flight[/url<] organization that gives veterans flights to visit their memorials. It's a good way to honor the veterans and remember the ones who made the ultimate sacrifice for all of us.

    • itaniwha
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal one side, indirect the other. And wood chunks, for extra smoke. Normally do a big cook-up, lasts for 4 days of lunches and dinners.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 1 year ago

    I use gas. I was a charcoal gerbil until my little guy was too small for the family and I was gifted a functional, larger gas grill. I see comments about how was easy charcoal can be but nothing to how quick the coal chimney gets it going. Honest, not much difference in net warm up time.

    Edit: Another benefit to coal is smoking! Oh, and you can get it much hotter for a proper sear. And finally, price. Gas is cheaper per operation it you run the numbers but that’s after an investment. It’s happily grill on a cheap coal grill but if I’m going gas it needs to be quality. One more thought, if I had the money my back yard would have a natural gas line to a sweet brick set up. Why? Coal is cool but that’s even cooler.

    • cygnus1
    • 1 year ago

    Iโ€™m lazy and I canโ€™t โ€œtaste propaneโ€. Gas all the way because it makes grilling multiple times per week not suck.

    • EricBorn
    • 1 year ago

    Oh man. It’s my topic. As much as I love the convenience of my gas grill, when it comes to a serious summer cookout there’s only thing I want to use for grilling: a fire pit.

    Last summer, I used old foundation stones from a fallen-down 19th-century wall on my property to make a fire pit. I lined them up, stacked them three rows high and sealed them together with hand-mixed mortar. What a great afternoon that was. (The cooler of PBR sitting nearby might have helped. The beer might have also made it into the mortar. I admit to nothing.)

    Now, cooking over a wood fire takes a bit of set up time, but it’s time that I’m happy to spend. If you’re too busy on a holiday to sit around a fire while it burns down to coals, you’re too busy. When the coals have settled into a hot, thick layer, the fire pit acts just like a large, immobile charcoal grill, and grilling enthusiasts can use the same tricks that they use over charcoal.

    I’m still salivating over the ribeyes I cooked last July in my firepit. Oh man.

    The best part of using a fire pit, though? When you’re done grilling, you pull out the rack, toss in a couple logs, and sip some Tallisker while the day settles into evening. Gas and charcoal grills are great for cooking food, but friends just don’t quite gather around them in the same way that they gather around a fire. And in the end, it’s that time gathered together that I’m interested in the most.

      • Pville_Piper
      • 1 year ago

      Sounds good… I might be doing a fire pit as well. And yes, a fine scotch as the evening winds down is always a good thing. Slรกinte mhaith my friend.

      As for Memorial Day, I always toast those who insured our freedoms with the ultimate sacrifice. I drink for those who can’t. This year it will be Knob Creek.

    • brucethemoose
    • 1 year ago

    If you grill alot, pellet grills are where it’s at. Especially if you smoke stuff (which you absolutely should).

    Otherwise, charcoal. Cheap charcoal grills work just fine, and you can get a decent one for the price of a bad gas grill.

      • Captain Ned
      • 1 year ago

      The ones I’ve looked at would make great smokers but don’t allow for direct radiant heat searing like a charcoal grill.

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqdDjNAyPdA[/url<]

    • toki
    • 1 year ago

    absolutely charcoal all the way. The flavor can’t be beat even though it can be a pain in the butt to keep the fire just right, especially if it’s windy outside.

    • Unknown-Error
    • 1 year ago

    Gas = dull, Charcoal = flavor

    • albundy
    • 1 year ago

    cant grill outside in cement city, so my only option is george foreman’s solution.

    • jeffcutsinger
    • 1 year ago

    Charcoal all the way, although I do own a gas grill: a gas oven with a “broil” setting.

    To get the charcoal going, I have a propane starter built-in to the grill itself and a looftlighter, which shoots out 1000F+ air. 5 minutes and things are going. Easy-peasy.

    • bthylafh
    • 1 year ago

    Boy I tell you hwhat.

      • cygnus1
      • 1 year ago

      Propane and propane accessories…

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    First word Char second word Coal!

    Bonis points for your stacked arrangement that allows for direct and indirect cooking.

    • anotherengineer
    • 1 year ago

    Thorin – When’s the last time there was a Friday night Topic on TR?

    Gandalf – Not for an age………………….when a different ruler owned the land…………….

    • JosiahBradley
    • 1 year ago

    It’s all gas in the end, right?

    • boskone
    • 1 year ago

    Lump charcoal. I don’t get the “gas is easier” thing: put some newspaper under a pile of charcoal and light it, crack a beer or whatever, then go inside and start getting everything set up. Or an electric starter instead of newspaper. By the time you’re ready to throw the food on the grill, the fire’s good and hot and the grill surface is ready to go.

    My guess is people are used to cooking on modern stoves: prep the food, fire up the stove, and cook. (Never mind most people seem not to understand letting the pan come up to temperature before putting food in.)

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