Put a Pillow on Your Fridge Day Shortbread

Some days' stock photos continue to be harder to source than others.

PC hardware and computing

  1. Corsair Dark Core RGB SE wireless gaming mouse and MM1000 review @ PC Perspective
  2. Cryorig Taku case review @ bit-tech
  3. NZXT Kraken M22 review @ Guru3D
  4. AMD's StoreMI technology @ HardOCP
  5. NZXT H500i case review @ Hexus
  6. Lenovo ThinkPad X280 review @ HotHardware
  7. NETGEAR Nighthawk Pro Gaming SX10 switch review @ KitGuru
  8. AMD Ryzen 7 2700 8-Core 65W processor review @ Legit Reviews
  9. ASRock X399M Taichi review @ TechPowerUp
  10. AMD stock coolers tested @ TechSpot
  11. The Plextor M9Pe NVMe SSD review @ AnandTech

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Apple reject iOS Steam Link app @ Rock Paper Shotgun
  2. Judge backs parents, saying their 30-year-old son must move out @ Slashdot
  3. Op-ed: Game companies need to cut the crap—loot boxes are obviously gambling @ Ars Technica

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. Amazon confirms that Echo device secretly shared user's private audio @ Ars Technica
  2. DJI Mavic Air vs. Mavic Pro vs. Mavic Pro Platinum @ New Atlas
  3. Stretching my skills: how (and why) I made my own compression sleeves @ HackADay

Science, technology, and space news

  1. NTSB: Uber's sensors worked; its software utterly failed in fatal crash @ Ars Technica
  2. Nissan shows off self-driving clout with a robot that draws up soccer pitches @ New Atlas
  3. India's Hotstar sets new benchmark with streaming record, draws over 10M concurrent viewers to a cricket match @ Slashdot

Cheese, memes, and shiny things

  1. Are Google's cat-loving employees killing burrowing owls? @ Slashdot
  2. Chuck E. Cheese's pizza is now available for delivery nationwide @ people.com
  3. Thermaltake TT Premium X1 RGB gaming keyboard review @ ThinkComputers
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • crabjokeman
    • 1 year ago

    Chuck E Cheese pizza? Oh, how terrible. I’d rather see a tour from the old Showbiz Pizza robots: [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd5c3Qtcr_w[/url<]

    • uni-mitation
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<] AMD's StoreMI technology @ HardOCP [/quote<] Ok, AMD, I will bite.....reads the article. Looks at the AMD's source materials. Ok, I will pass. It seems AMD have simply made a proprietary software implementation on top of SSD caching. AMD, call it what it is. The OS and most used apps to be loaded to RAM? hmmm, where have I seen that before? Oh, yes, Puppy Linux and other diminutive distros that load themselves to RAM? Without having to pay a license fee or buy your new chipset? Marketing strikes again. I would have appreciated the author having the guts to call this thing for what it is and not simply echo AMD's marketing points. It felt like an insult to my intelligence. And where is the market for this thing? Enthusiasts will not be using this solution when they have the options of using Raid, Optane, and other less cumbersome hardware based solutions like simply buying a large capacity SSD now that Quadruple level NAND will be hitting the market? This seems to be DOA to me, but then again I look forward to AMD' s marketing points. Who is so poor to buy a SSD and instead has to buy a Hard drive and be burdened with a proprietary software solution in which the publisher may decide to abandon it when it is turning a loss? uni-mitation

      • brucethemoose
      • 1 year ago

      Or Windows Prefetch/Superfetch. Pretty sure most OSX and Linux distros have some program caching mechanism too… But I’m not sure why you brought up Puppy Linux, I don’t think it caches actual programs more than any other distro.

      There’s tons of software that does this same thing, even if most of it is (unfortunately) proprietary, expensive, and/or junky.

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        I mentioned Puppy Linux because it is a distro for old-hardware. Since Puppy loads its live-session entirely to RAM; it basically “revives” old hardware.

        I am just curious what market segment is AMD trying to get at with this thing. Maybe it is a step in the right direction; I think it leaves much to be desired.

        uni-mitation

      • Zizy
      • 1 year ago

      Eh, there are different caches, this one works by shuffling data around, keeping it on one place only – like Apple’s Fusion drive or MS’s equivalent in the Surface Studio.
      Unlike say Intel’s Optane cache, where data is duplicated there.

      Market for the thing is a cheap gaming box like many pre-built things. If tech works well (and it seems it does) your 250GB SSD + 2TB HDD puts OS and currently playing game in the cache, so you get SSD performance for all the games, yet you have tons of storage for those games.

      Though, frankly, why the heck would anyone want AMD or Intel to mess around with such solution instead of rely on Windows to enable the same thing eventually?

      • Antimatter
      • 1 year ago

      I think you answered your own question. If you have a multi-terabyte HDD and are are not interested in buying a multi-terabyte SSD StoreMI provides near SSD performance at no cost. The reviews that I have read say StoreMI is superior to Apple’s Fusion Drive and Intel’s SRT.

    • Captain Ned
    • 1 year ago

    Hmm, pillow on fridge. Strike that; reverse it (tweetle tweetle tweetle).

    Come with me back to 1983 and “a small Northeastern college” ([i<]alte käckers[/i<] like me will get that reference). Somehow I inherited the soda machine franchise in my fraternity house. I left campus in the Spring of 1983 with the machine where it was supposed to be. Upon my return (a couple of weeks before classes), the machine was nowhere to be found. After giving up, I went to the house kitchen to scare up some grub from whatever was still in the walk-in. I opened the door to find the soda machine on its side in the walk-in, its top end lying on a pillow, and covered with a blanket. Took quite some effort to get it out of there.

    • uni-mitation
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<] Amazon confirms that Echo device secretly shared user's private audio @ Ars Technica [/quote<] Call me an alarmist, but this is but the beginning. After all, we need to police people with the words they use. This seems to be an accidental misfire that was quite rare, but it is proof-of-concept for that telescreen of [i<] 1984[/i<]. I strongly believe Snowden's claims that State actors have the resources to turn any device with radios and a mic into a listening device. We still have a shadowy tribunal in FISA that does not serve as a real check against violations of our liberties. It is time to advocate for a privacy amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Resist the erosion of your civil liberties. Abolish the Patriot act, and the means that the U.S government has to spy on us without proper judicial review. I recall the words of Thomas Paine in [i<]Common Sense[/i<]: "Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one: for when we suffer, or are exposed to the same miseries BY A GOVERNMENT, which we might expect in a country WITHOUT GOVERNMENT, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer. Government, like dress, is the badge of lost innocence; the palaces of kings are built upon the ruins of the bowers of paradise. For were the impulses of conscience clear, uniform and irresistibly obeyed, man would need no other lawgiver; but that not being the case, he finds it necessary to surrender up a part of his property to furnish means for the protection of the rest; and this he is induced to do by the same prudence which in every other case advises him, out of two evils to choose the least. Wherefore, security being the true design and end of government, it unanswerably follows that whatever form thereof appears most likely to ensure it to us, with the least expense and greatest benefit, is preferable to all others." at [url=http://www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/sense2.htm<] second paragraph [/url<] of "Of the Origin and Design of Government in General, with Concise Remarks on the English Constitution" Do we want to furnish the tools by which we suffer our loss of liberties? At what price for perceived safety? Say no to a tyranny of the surveillance state. uni-mitation

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Great post. I remember reading Common Sense in a literature class in college.

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        That and the Federalist Papers MUST be mandatory reading in any civics course. I would also add the Marbury decision; John Marshall basically founded the Judiciary by firmly establishing Judicial Review and making it a co-equal branch of government. Madison, a critic of Hamilton and the Federalists, was instrumental in having the Bills of Rights ratified.

        Sometimes I feel like Americans don’t know how good they have it! I guess when you are born with all of these rights, and liberties, you take them for granted. I am proud to adopt this country as my own and call myself American! The land of the FREE and the BRAVE. Let’s keep it that way! Light that beacon of Liberty as a signal to anyone who hungers to be free from the chains of tyranny!

        uni-mitation

        P.S- The founding fathers were not perfect. They each had skeletons in the closets. What we must value is what a stable form of government Republicanism is, and how it serves to safeguard against the tyranny of the majority (democracy). Ideas live on, our mortal coil does not.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 1 year ago

      You know you can just… not buy an Echo, right? These aren’t government-issued devices. I don’t think it’s worth going full Orwell on an accidental command sequence, but to each their own I suppose.

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        1- You make a fine point about not buying the device.

        2-I was referring to the power that the State has to spy on you and gather that information without warrant.

        3-The same tools that we hurriedly voted for fight against terrorism may be used against us at any future point if someone else feels justified to do so.

        4-It is a reasonable assumption that there is inadequate congressional oversight of the intelligence community. It took Snowden’ s revelations for the public to find out about the extent of spying.

        5-I challenge your viewpoint that since it is not a government device that only apathy should be the appropriate response. Private sector companies are complicit and partners of the intelligence community. I have no reason to believe anything that these companies say.

        uni-mitation

      • ET3D
      • 1 year ago

      Actually, that title is wrong. Alexa shared a private conversation, but according to Google it told the user about it, which makes ‘secretly shared’ an obvious fallacy.

        • uni-mitation
        • 1 year ago

        1- A very good point since this was an accidental programming mistake.

        2- I would still say that the line between the potential of a state actor, like the U.S. Government with its almost unlimited resources, to spy on people without much qualms about due process is not far-fetched.

        3-Would you be curious to know about if you got caught in their net of spying? Well, it would be a “secret” to you, Congress, and the American people. It seems our representatives have no qualms about it. They grandstand for the kabuki theater, but no meaningful legislation has passed to insure that Snowden’ s revelations are not true at any time in the future.

        uni-mitation

          • Voldenuit
          • 1 year ago

          Re: #2, Given the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, I’d say that private entities/corporations, with very little oversight or public stake, will be far more dangerous in the near future than governments, most of which are still ultimately answerable to their citizens.

          The result may not be as direct as imprisoning malcontents, but they are capable of influencing public opinion without the public even knowing they were being manipulated. And with the lobbying power of large corporations, they have a disproportionate voice in law- and policy-making.

          Dystopian governments were a popular trope in Orwell’s time, but Corporocracies are a far more common menace in recent science fiction, and for good cause.

            • uni-mitation
            • 1 year ago

            Reply to Re#2

            2.1-You make a good point that our privacy and the source of those violations are not only from government.

            2.2- I would respectfully argue that your focus on private companies’ mishaps is not as troublesome as that of government. There are currently no data protections except statutory ones that vary by each government regarding certain facets of an individual’ s life.

            2.3-In contrast, the Bill of Rights are express limitations of the Government’s power. For example, the first amendment is about limiting the government abridging the expression of freedom of speech by law, or the power of the state. It does not limit the private sector to restrict the same with their Terms of Service, etc.

            2.4- Governments are more likely to be used as tools of authoritarian regimes than private companies. Private companies are still fictional creations under the law. It still does not make it right what Facebook was doing. BTW- I shift most of the blame to Facebook for it was something that was expressly done via its APIs, which stretches their explanation that they didn’ t believe it would be used for such purposes. (don’ t be surprised that thieves ransack the place if you don’ t bother to lock the place). They simply got caught.

            2.5- I still raise the speculation so supported by historic data: the outlawing of certain behaviors by the private sector does not necessarily imply that the government isn’t restricted in doing the same “illegal” things.

            2.5.1- A case in point would be gambling. It is outlawed for the private sector, but we still have the running of state lotteries. The same could be about loan-sharking. It is outlawed except when the government does it. When a law authorizes a certain behavior for the government, it makes it automatically legal when it would have been illegal in the private sector. Why is it that the second amendment deals with the people’s right to bear arms? Because it is assumed that the power of the state to bear arms is undisputed.

            2.5.2- The only protections that matter should be that limitations of the government’s power just like the Bill of Rights. All other protections should be the providence of their respective states on how they want their private citizens & fictional entities to comport themselves.

            uni-mitation

    • Goty
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]Op-ed: Game companies need to cut the crap—loot boxes are obviously gambling @ Ars Technica[/quote<] Maybe this is just me, but I don't really see a difference between loot boxes and CCGs or those little mini figures that seem to be popular right now. It mostly seems like people are just upset with microtransactions in general and they've just now found a "real" reason to attack them.

      • thedosbox
      • 1 year ago

      Read the article. With cards, you can sell duplicates to others, instead of having them sit in your inventory doing nothing. The reveals some games use are also misleading (i.e. pretending that you *just* missed out, thus encouraging you to try again).

        • Goty
        • 1 year ago

        Uhhh yeah, [i<]that's[/i<] what I did with all of my duplicate magic cards! Sold them! Right! *slowy nudges several boxes of old cards out of sight with his foot* On a serious note, using one of the author's own examples in Dota 2, it's possible to sell in-game items on the steam marketplace. Does that mean it no longer fits the definition? Why does it matter that you can only spend that money in the Steam marketplace? How were things like the keys in Team Fortress 2 any different? Those have been around for at least a decade. Why the outrage only now?

          • thedosbox
          • 1 year ago

          Read the article. Dota 2 is not excluded from his condemnation of exploitative loot box mechanics.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      It isn’t just you. There are plenty of other people who don’t get it.

      gam·ble/ˈɡambəl/
      verb

      play games of chance for money; bet.
      take risky action in the hope of a desired result.

      If I buy a loot box with money for a chance at winning, it sure sounds like gambling.

      Please share your point of view and how you disagree with loot boxes being labeled as gambling.

        • Goty
        • 1 year ago

        How does the above definition [i<]not[/i<] apply to CCGs or mini figures? Y'know, since that was my whole point.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 1 year ago

          I think he’s agreeing with you. And all of it is a menace and an inconvenience to me as a parent (since my daughter wants all of the above), but not particularly illegal.

          However I won’t play games with lootboxes. This spring I got sucked back into Hearthstone for a while but then realized exactly what you said – CCGs are just one big loot box.

            • Goty
            • 1 year ago

            I think “nuisance” may be a better term than “menace.” To me, all of this seems like outrage formed in the absence of personal responsibility that seems to be so rampant these days.

            • uni-mitation
            • 1 year ago

            Ding ding ding! Whatever happened to personal responsibility? It seems we are raising a generation that expects the nanny state to do everything for them. When I was bullied in school my mom told me a simple solution: stand up for yourself, and get into a fight even if you lose. Nowadays no authority figure would advocate that, and yes, I got in trouble, but I wasn’t a target of bullying because I took responsibility for myself.

            Triggered because someone wrote some mean things online? Someone get the whaw-bulance!

            Grow a thicker skin & take responsibility for what you have the power to better yourself instead of trying to police the world and force everyone to your utopia. There will be mean people, etc and the sooner we learn to deal with them the better. No nanny state needed.

            uni-mitation

            • Kretschmer
            • 1 year ago

            Dude, you’re triggered by an article about keeping children out of gambling with their parents money. Maybe you’re the snowflake?

            • uni-mitation
            • 1 year ago

            Maybe you have something of substance to add to the conversation.

            uni-mitation

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            It’s a pain in my ass, how’s that?

            • uni-mitation
            • 1 year ago

            Indeed it is a pain in the ass to be a parent, but also one of the greatest joys. People would be well advised of the awesome responsibilities they will have to shape & mold a young mind to be an adult. I would respectfully submit that no state may be able to supplant the love and nurturing that a parent has for their child.

            uni-mitation

      • superjawes
      • 1 year ago

      1. Resale (most games with boxes seem to have no resale/trade/DE mechanic.

      2. Maybe physical CCGs/TCGs avoided gambling regulation because they were “for kids” and not on the scale of AAA games in 201X.

      The big reason loot boxes are getting attention is freaking EA and Star Wars. The [i<]Battlefront 2[/i<] system was just over the line, and putting it into a game that was guaranteed to sell well (sequel + Star Wars + SW Movie Release). It got WAAAAY more attention than anyone in the industry wanted, and now it's on legislative radar. Oh, and 2017 was a pretty big year for loot boxes. [i<]Shadow of War[/i<] and [i<]Destiny 2[/i<] made big, fundamental changes to their systems to cram stuff into loot boxes, so that helped create a testy environment once EA did their EA thing.

        • brucethemoose
        • 1 year ago

        No resale is a big one, only because it makes loot boxes a monetary black hole… Otherwise known as a “service”.

        You put money in, you get some (randomized) service out. There’s no possibility of money (legally) going back into your bank account, like gambling or a trading card you sell later.

        I think CCGs fall under the “collectable” umbrella. People pay LOTs of money for wierd junk all the time, and I don’t think it’s the law’s place to judge whether they want an old Porsche, an ancient pinball machine, a doll, or a card.

      • uni-mitation
      • 1 year ago

      How about legalize gambling all together like smoking? We are all responsible adults. In my estimation, it would be a better use of the state’s limited resources to treat people with the disease than to outlaw gambling.

      FYI- when the government is the purveyor of gambling it is perfectly legal just the many things the state does. Loan-sharking is illegal except when the state does with its student’s loan programs. A mafioso would be envious of the power and the exceptions that are carved for student loan programs. A modern day slavery program in America all paved with the good intentions of higher education for all! There is no such thing as a free lunch.

      My two cents.

      uni-mitation

        • Shobai
        • 1 year ago

        Smoking is a pretty good comparison, since the cost to the state, at least in Australia where there is state-sponsored healthcare, due to the effects of smoking is considered to be many times higher than the revenue gained by taxing smoking.

      • Zizy
      • 1 year ago

      Yes, it is continuum, there isn’t a hard line what could be reasonably considered gambling and what isn’t. But there are significant differences between these things.

      Lego mystery thingies and so on are almost no gambling. Yes, some are more desirable and worth a bit more, but generally none are rarer than the other and you aren’t going to gamble away fortune by those (you are going to spend fortune by the virtue of them being crazy expensive, but this is different).

      Football players kids collect, yes, getting top players is expensive and you can trade/sell them well. Unsure how far they went by now, but in my days it seemed rare cards were a bit rarer than the proportion of rare/normal slots in album, but the difference was below x2. At least then there wasn’t a lot of gambling addiction by these packs, though people spent tons of money on them (again, by overpaying for useless crap). People got some rush opening the pack and seeing something glitters, hoping it is Ronaldo or whatever. But the mechanic was that it tries to get a kid convince his friends to collect cards too – a networking effect. Not a slot machine type of thingy.

      Contrast that with games. Non-epic loot is worthless, while good loot is akin to hitting a jackpot, and the games take most of the casino tricks to entice you to pay again and again. The only difference is that a slot machine operates only with money, while loot boxes give other rewards.

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