Asus ROG Strix XG248Q display shines bright at 240 Hz

Asus has stealthily launched a new monitor on us. The ROG Strix XG248Q is essentially a 24″ version of the ROG Strix XG258Q. Like its bigger brother, the company's latest gaming display promises a scorching 240-Hz refresh rate along with FreeSync support and a blur-reduction mode. The monitor also has RGB LED lighting on the back, and you can use Asus' Aura software to sync it up with the rest of your system's lightshow.

Two of the specs on this monitor are likely to make some gerbils disregard it outright. The ROG Strix XG248Q uses a TN panel in 1920×1080 resolution. It'd be a shame if the display went overlooked, though. I've used a BenQ XL2546 for a bit, and the perfect flow of frames at 240 Hz is a thing to behold. The TN panel also confers a 1-ms response time. Switching speed like that greatly improves image clarity at such a high refresh rate.

Like several Asus monitors before it (including my own ROG Strix XG27VQ), the XG248Q supports Asus Enhanced Low Motion Blur (ELMB). Assuming you can maintain the high framerate you need to take advantage of the feature, ELMB strobing is every bit as good as the Ultra Low Motion Blur feature found on G-Sync displays. The XG248Q's 400 cd/m² backlight should keep things plenty bright even while ELMB is engaged.

With that said, using ELMB will still alter the brightness. If you prefer an ultra-vivid look, you could instead use FreeSync. The XG248Q supports AMD's adaptive-refresh technology between 48 and 240 Hz over the HDMI and DisplayPort inputs. While that lower bound isn't as low as we might like, if your frame rate is dropping below 48 then you're missing the point of this display anyway. Of course, you'll have to have a Radeon to make use of FreeSync. The ELMB feature is available to everyone, though.

The use of a TN panel does mean making some sacrifices in image quality, of course. TN screens have gotten much better over the years, especially lately. Even still, Asus' viewing angle specs of 170° horizontally and 160° vertically are probably a little generous. The company doesn't even mention the color gamut on this display, but it does spec a believable contrast ratio of 1000:1.

Gamers will be able to hook up to the XG248Q in 240-Hz mode using one of two HDMI 2.0 ports or a DisplayPort connection. There's also an HDMI 1.4 jack that you could perhaps use for a game console or another non-240Hz-capable device. A 3.5-mm jack lets users listen to the audio coming out of their graphics card, and there's a two-port USB 3.0 hub as well. 

The XG248Q hasn't shown up at retail yet, and Asus isn't saying anything definitive about pricing. We expect that it might go for a bit less than the XG258Q's list price of $450, though. Keep an eye out if you're a twitch action gamer, as very few displays will be better for that kind of play.

Comments closed
    • jts888
    • 1 year ago

    Not that 240 Hz isn’t a pretty nice accomplishment, but I can’t help but wonder if even crazier things like 1080p480 are just around the corner given that DP 1.3/1.4 controllers are starting to appear.

    For example, the crazy Zisworks Xilinx-based kit ([url=https://www.blurbusters.com/4k-120hz-with-bonus-240hz-and-480hz-modes/<]covered really well at Blurbusters[/url<]) can hit 540p480, which seems to suggest that only T-Con per-column DAC bandwidth remains as a limitation, but there is at least justification for making faster T-Cons given DP 1.3 external-facing scalers/controllers.

      • Pwnstar
      • 1 year ago

      And with frame rate amplification, you’ll be able to actually hit those frame rates with the average GPU.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    Strobing backlights are really amazing to behold, but they really need two things:
    -Adaptive Sync compatibility *or* a one-button toggle between adaptive sync and strobing
    -Higher brightness on displays

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      100% behind you on this.

      Most monitor OSDs are awful and it’s bad enough that you can’t toggle between them. Worse still, sometimes your brightness/contrast/colour calibration are lost when switching since either AS or ULMB are linked to horrible ‘out of the box’ presets which are often retina-searingly bright with unnecessarily stupid extra fluff like edge enhancement and black-level enhancement.

        • Kretschmer
        • 1 year ago

        Ideally, the toggle would also control brightness, as you want your ULMB brightness is be above your desktop brightness.

        Because right now you need to toggle:
        -Brightness (OSD)
        -ULMB (OSD)
        -ULMB/GSync (NVidia Driver)
        -VSync setting (NVidia Driver)

        Every. Damn. Time.

    • moose17145
    • 1 year ago

    You know what I like about my Nixeus EDG27… It doesn’t have all these “gamer” features like RGB LEDS everywhere… and weird logos that shine down onto the desk and all that garbage… oh and it cost me less money BECAUSE it doesn’t have all that useless crap

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      As a gamer, I find gamer-branding insulting and ugly as hell.
      I usually go out of my way to avoid it.

        • moose17145
        • 1 year ago

        The only thing that I can think of that I really wish this Nixeus had is a USB Hub… but meh… it was hardly a deal breaker given the other specs that this thing has.

        Well I guess the only other gripe is how dang picky this thing is regarding DisplayPort cables. Went through multiple DP 1.2 AND 1.4 rated cables before finding one that seems to be stable running 2560×1440 @ 144Hz. Not sure if it’s the monitor that is picky, the cables actually not working as well as hoped, or if the issue is my aging R9 290…

    • gerryg
    • 1 year ago

    This just went to the top of my wishlist! The 25″ version is right behind it. Or ahead of it, depending on how much money I can fee up. 😉

    • SlappedSilly
    • 1 year ago

    I also have a BenQ XL2546, and I agree, it’s an amazing sight to behold. I do wish it could also do Freesync, like this one does.

    My reason for choosing that model when other 240Hz monitors existed was it was the only one that did motion blur reduction all the way up to 240Hz. The others at the time only offered that up to 120 or 144; less than the monitors max refesh rate. I don’t see that clearly clearly indicated for this ROG Strix XG248Q, so if ELMB @ 240Hz is important or of interest to you, don’t assume! Find that answer before you buy.

      • tay
      • 1 year ago

      Dumb question – do you notice a difference between 120/144 and 240? It would seem only relevant for competitive play at the very very top.

        • SlappedSilly
        • 1 year ago

        I haven’t done a comparison between modes like that, and I don’t really play competitive.

        I got this monitor in interest of picking up experimenting with perception again. That ended with the death of my last over-driven CRT, and LCD monitors were such sloppy, eye-straining garbage I gave up. I know why LCD’s were so bad now, and strobed 240Hz was too enticing an opportunity to look for that limit of perception again.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        That would be nice to know. The scrolling alone at 144 Hz makes it worth it to have a high-refresh rate monitor. 240Hz would be nice if it game in 1440P. Idc if most games aren’t going to hit the frames; it’s not the only benefit.

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