Intel Core i7-8086K celebrates 40 years of x86 with 5-GHz Turbo clocks

Intel's Computex press conference in Taipei today was heavy on processor news. First off, the company celebrated 40 years of the x86 instruction set architecture with the Core i7-8086K desktop CPU. The company says this chip is its first with a 5-GHz Turbo frequency, up from 4.7 GHz for a single core on the Coffee Lake Core i7-8700K.

We'll want to see how the rest of this chip's Turbo table shakes out, but single-core performance on this part will no doubt be the snappiest available from any stock-clocked CPU, period. Intel will be giving away 8,086 of these limited-edition chips as part of its celebrations, too. No word on pricing or general availability for these chips, but we'll update as soon as we know more.

Intel further announced that it will introduce a new X-series enthusiast CPU lineup and its next-generation Core S-series (read: desktop) processor by the end of the year. That S-series chip is likely to be the eight-core Coffee Lake part that's been producing so much smoke in the rumor mill for many months. Such a part would be an impressive kick-off for the ninth generation of Intel Core i CPUs, however the company chooses to define it.

For mobile computing, Intel announced the existence of Whiskey Lake, its next-generation U-series processor family for 15-W TDPs. The company says Whiskey Lake will deliver “double-digit performance gains” versus past parts, although that claim is drawn from comparisons to a dual-core Core i7-7500U rather than a Kaby Lake Refresh Core i7 with four cores and eight threads.

With that in mind, the real improvements from Whiskey Lake would appear to come outside the CPU silicon. The Whiskey Lake mobile platform appears to enjoy the same improvements we got with Intel's H370, B360, and H310 chipsets, as Intel says integrated Gigabit Wi-Fi can come standard as part of notebooks with those processors inside.

The Coffee Lake PCH, for lack of a better term, features support for Intel's Integrated Connectivity, or CNVi, technology. CNVi moves the logical or control functions of Intel wireless modules into the platform controller hub itself. With CNVi, manufacturers only need to add a compatible companion RF (or CRF) module to their motherboards to enable wireless networking support.

Along with a new ultra-low-voltage processor family called Amber Lake-Y, Intel expects Whiskey Lake CPUs to appear in more than 70 new laptops and 2-in-1s by the end of the year. We'll be eager to get our hands on all of this spiffy new silicon as soon as we're able.

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    • cygnus1
    • 1 year ago

    Well, I’d been planning on going AMD for my next build (whenever I felt like replacing 32GB of perfectly fine DDR3 seemed like a good idea) but an 8086 might be my next CPU with that turbo

      • tacitust
      • 1 year ago

      It’s going to be a limited edition chip, so be quick, and expect to pay through the nose.

        • cygnus1
        • 1 year ago

        Honestly, if this comes out even relatively soon I doubt I’ll buy it. I expect that by the time replacing 32GB of working DDR3 is a good idea, mainly influence by stupid prices and extremely mediocre performance gains of DDR4, another generation or two of CPU might come out before I upgrade my main desktop. I will probably move to DDR5 and PCIe gen 5 too. Both of those will probably be around in a couple years…

    • Binglewood
    • 1 year ago

    For the X series it would be nice if they increased the PCI lanes to 64 and came out with PCI 4.0 capability. Seems like we have been on PCI 3.0 forever.

      • adamlongwalker
      • 1 year ago

      I agree with you PCI lanes at 64 would be great. As far as PCI. 4.0 yea that would be nice too.

      • DavidC1
      • 1 year ago

      That’s understandable, but only the largest XCC die has 64 lanes. The HCC die has enough for 48. In the XCC die chips 16 of the 64 lanes are reserved for OmniPath.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Nobody buys a 6-core chip and only cares about the single-core peak turbo speed.

    What matters is all-core speed. Why would they not be open about that?

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      Assuming it’s literally no faster than the 8700K, which is unlikely, I’d still take it over a RyZen chip any day of the week for anything other than Cinebench demos.

      Oh wait… Intel’s got Cinebench covered too.

        • Spunjji
        • 1 year ago

        Enjoy your 1080p high-refresh gaming 🙂

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      What about all the people buying Ryzen 2700X and using bclk oc to preserve xfr because they find the peak single-core turbo important?

      • maxxcool
      • 1 year ago

      Were almost there for full 5ghz on all consumer cores : [url<]https://techreport.com/news/33752/intel-teases-28-core-56-thread-hedt-cpu-on-stage-at-computex[/url<]

        • Spunjji
        • 1 year ago

        That is not in any reasonable sense a consumer CPU, and it is not operating at stock.

          • maxxcool
          • 1 year ago

          Doesn’t matter. Step 1 to 5ghz ‘all day’ consumer is at least the ability to make one run 5ghz. but to make 20+ cores run 5ghz is even better even if it is at 1.4volts, it’s impressive. it means a consumer 5ghz cpu is not only possible.. its probably doable with limited volume RIGHT NOW with lower voltages.

          it is a step forward at least 😉

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      All-core speed is likely more dependent on individual silicon. It’s not like better single-core peaks are a bad thing…

      • Freon
      • 1 year ago

      The issue may be trying to keep TDP at 95W to make sure no one slapping this in the cheapest possible motherboard has a failure due to the chip being out of spec.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      It is because modern CPUs dynamically adjust their clock speed based on thread utilization and thermal output by default.

      Turbo max speed just means how fast it allow itself to go under ideal conditions.

      • BushLin
      • 1 year ago

      …except when the best single threaded performance comes from a 6-core chip

      • elites2012
      • 1 year ago

      thats seems to be the only reason people are buy the i7 8700. just cause it clocks higher than a ryzen 1800.

    • tsk
    • 1 year ago

    The PCH on 300 series(except Z370) is called Cannon Point.

    • jokinin
    • 1 year ago

    5 GHz turbo speed is nice, but we should have to wait and see what speed will you get when running all cores at 100%.
    Anyway, my new Ryzen 5 2600X is on the way, and I don’t regret it.

    • brucethemoose
    • 1 year ago

    We’re also coming up on the 3-year Skylake anniversary… Which Intel just might celebrate by releasing another Skylake-based CPU.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      hey-o!

        • blastdoor
        • 1 year ago

        That is Weird wild stuff!

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    With all of the bogus rumors floating around recently, I’m surprised this one actually turned out to be a thing.

      • Redocbew
      • 1 year ago

      I wasn’t sure if this would be it, but I figured Intel would do something to mark the passing of 40 years since the 8086. A megacorp never misses a chance to talk about how awesome they are.

        • freebird
        • 1 year ago

        Yeah, and in 14 years, everyone will be saying “Intel, Nvidia, AMD, Apple??? Who are they?” because everything in 2032 will be Taco Bell.

          • chuckula
          • 1 year ago

          [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cF6D8zDa9U<]Totally didn't get that reference[/url<]

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