Deal of the day: a Radeon RX 580 4 GB for $210

Cryptocurrency prices are crashing, and graphics-card prices seem to be coming down with them—at least for the moment. A good example is Asus' Dual Radeon RX 580 O4G, on sale today at Newegg for just $210 after promo code EMCSPVER3. That's just $10 above the Radeon RX 580 4 GB's $199 suggested price. We haven't seen prices like this on a Radeon RX 580 for ages, and it's cheaper than most RX 570s on the 'egg at the moment.

The Dual RX 580 O4G has a twin-fan cooler, slightly-warmed-up 1380-MHz boost clocks in its “OC mode,” 4 GB of GDDR5 RAM clocked at 7 GT/s, two HDMI ports, two DIsplayPorts, and a DVI output. None of this really matters, because if you need a midrange graphics card and have been holding off on buying because of inflated prices, you should be checking out with this one by the time you read this.

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    • anotherengineer
    • 2 years ago

    Only $355 in Canada w/o tax, $401.15 after tax

    [url<]https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814126196&cm_re=ASUS_Radeon_RX_580_O4G-_-14-126-196-_-Product[/url<]

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      yeah but that’s a steal. THat’s only what, like $160 USD? 😀 😀 😀

        • anotherengineer
        • 2 years ago

        lol

        I hope not

        $306.13 US whew just had to check lol

    • ptsant
    • 2 years ago

    Bring it on, at last. Now for that Vega 56 at $300…

      • Shobai
      • 2 years ago

      Too late, now you’re back to this card at $300

    • benedict
    • 2 years ago

    210$ for an year old card that is actually a slightly overclocked 2 years old card. A few years ago such a card would be worth no more than 130$.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      Neither games nor the cards they run on are advancing at as fast a pace as they were two years ago. The RX 580 is still a perfectly legitimate option for smooth gaming at 1920×1080.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        It’s also worth pointing out that the RX580’s version of Polaris is less desirable to many people because it offers worse performance/W and worse Performance/dB than the Polaris 10 in the RX480.

        In saying that, I’ve just bought RX580’s for the first time in about eight months, thanks to a Cryptocurrency haitus. It’s odd to see all the UK vendors offering “30% discounts” when in reality they’re just a removal of the artifical markup and we’re still 5-10% above the original MSRP.

        Our VR rigs use Nvidia Exclusively and today I ordered a (yes, just one this time!) GTX1080 for £399. That’s £480 for you tax-paying consumers, and notably it is £50 less than the Nvidia offical MSRP price cut 15 months ago. Whilst AMD cards that are desirable for the miners have finally returned to normality, Nvidia cards are quite literally a bargain right now.

        It’s just a shame about the G-Sync lock-in and imminent obsolescence from Volta/Ampere/Whatever…

        • benedict
        • 2 years ago

        I’m not saying it’s a bad card. It’s actually vastly superior to what I have. It’s a shame the market has stagnated so much that we’ve had absolutely no progress for the past 2 years. I miss the time when we had 6 month GPU refresh cycles.

        • ptsant
        • 2 years ago

        Until we get the next round of 3d engines, I don’t see a big change in GPU requirements. Then all of a sudden everyone needs to upgrade 🙂

      • dragontamer5788
      • 2 years ago

      Hardware upgrades have slowed down dramatically. Neither Navi nor consumer-Volta (or whatever “next-gen NVidia” will be…) seem ready. We’re pretty much stuck with this generation of cards for at least another 6-months, maybe longer.

        • jts888
        • 2 years ago

        I think that current SIMT designs have about reached the peak FLOPS/Watt possible for fp32 on commodity 14nm lithography nodes, so the manufacturers’ best options for increasing graphics performance are: [list<][*<]encourage fp16 usage anywhere possible for newest gen cards [/*<][*<]rework the non-ALU pipeline pieces with new accelerated functionality (e.g., Vega primitive shaders, Maxwell tiled rasterization, or Pascal multi-projection stuff for VR), at the risk of poor uptake or failed driver/API integration. [/*<][*<]massively scale up some existing part of your fixed function pipeline (e.g., geometry/tessellation in Maxwell) then convince devs to heavily use your new shader libraries in upcoming titles so that all prior cards get bottlenecks and new cards have the appearance of being much faster. [/*<][*<]wait for 7nm[/*<][/list<] Because Watts/FLOPS worsens more than linearly with frequency, the right general long-term solution is almost certainly Epyc-style MCMs with smaller, individually binned dies clocked substantially lower than their designs' limits. That said, getting that to work in a software-transparent way is a nightmare, hence it not being already done some time ago.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 2 years ago

      You can call it inefficient, but that usage of “overclocked” should stop. The state of the art is to reliably push silicon to its limits.

        • Spunjji
        • 2 years ago

        Agreed here, in that I tried to push a couple of the original Polaris cards (RX470s) up past 1250Mhz and the success rate was spotty to say the least. That these run reliably at those clocks shows they must have found the right voltage curve for their process; it’s just a shame it cost so much in terms of power use as the 400 series was pretty good for that.

    • drfish
    • 2 years ago

    Even at that price, you’d have to be high to put them in Crossfire.

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Wait, wait wait…

      I’m now seeing an untapped youtube market opportunity with High PC Builds.

      • freebird
      • 2 years ago

      Why is that? I cross fired 2 R9 290s for several years before upgrading. The games I played worked without issue if the driver supported the game. I don’t think Ages of Mythology did, but then it would play just as well on Intel integrated graphics probably.

        • drfish
        • 2 years ago

        It was a lame joke, 2×210, “high” – never mind, I’ll see myself out.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I got it! I understood that reference.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    Perhaps most telling about the (current, always-in-flux) state of mining is that this card is still in stock an hour after this post went up. Not too long ago they were gone in minutes.

      • DPete27
      • 2 years ago

      You could buy this card yesterday if you were on newegg email list as part of the Shell Shocker Early Access.

      Just goes to show that Crypto demand is nowhere near what it used to be, but online retailers are slow to let GPU prices slide back down to normal levels since consumers have now been conditioned to pay these sky-high prices.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 2 years ago

        I probably got that email but I just delete everything I get from Newegg these days. They just send too much mail.

        • freebird
        • 2 years ago

        if consumers were “conditioned” to buy at sky high prices then the price wouldn’t come down… the prices come down when supply exceeds demand.

          • Spunjji
          • 2 years ago

          It’s kind of an exploratory exchange process. Demand falls, so you let prices slide, demand spikes, see if you can hold it there… etc. So you’re both correct. Consumer memory is pretty short-lived.

    • Shobai
    • 2 years ago

    The reviews aren’t positive – most / all make note of either flimsy fan blades that break off under ‘normal’ use, or fans that stop spinning.

    [Edit: well, I should not have posted that immediately prior to bedtime. I definitely got the magnitude wrong, and I’m sorry for that mistake]

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      [url<]https://hbr.org/2018/03/online-reviews-are-biased-heres-how-to-fix-them[/url<]

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        [url<]http://lmgtfy.com/?q=I+guess+we+just+throw+the+baby+out+with+the+bathwater+until+Newegg+fixes+their+review+system+then[/url<]

      • thx1138r
      • 2 years ago

      “most / all” Are you kidding? I counted exactly 3 out of 13 reviews that mentioned fan blades. Not a great sign, granted, but far from most/all.

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        You are correct

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      What normal use involves touching the fan blades at all? “You’re holding it wrong.” Very literally.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, don’t touch them. Don’t blow them out with compressed air.

          • Shobai
          • 2 years ago

          I do not disagree

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        Funnily enough, I don’t recall any reviews mentioning touching the blades. I believe one mentions them breaking without external interference, though.

      • rnalsation
      • 2 years ago

      A lot of the reviews on that card looked like crypto miners (non-normal use case, one review even mentioned many cards being stacked together causing issues) and several were non-verified purchasers.

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        [quote ] under ‘normal’ use[/quote]

        Limiting reviews shown to only verified purchasers, you still get the fan fail review.

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      I buy several hundred graphics cards a year and I absolutely refuse to buy anything without a backplate to provide rigidity and protection to the back of the PCB.

      It’s just not worth getting the cheapest graphics card on the market, ever. They’re always inadequate in some way….

      • jarder
      • 2 years ago

      Fan blades do occasionally fail, but it’s usually because some stray power cable gets caught in them (say, by someone lacking cable management skills, not naming names…), not from the plastic heating up as one or two of those reviews suggest.

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    I’m so happy that GPUs are finally dropping back to reality. With any luck RAM will continue to fall as well!

      • Chrispy_
      • 2 years ago

      RAM is arguably more important. Yes, I’m as pleased as you about this (potentially permanent) return to normality for the GPU market, but GPUs haven’t changed much in 5 years. An HD7950 is still a decent card.

      On the other hand, 4-thread CPUs have really taken a beating in the last few years. Blame the advent of affordable 12 and 16-thread options if you must, but the CPU market has been far more interesting. I’d have upgraded months ago to either Coffee or Zen+ if RAM wasn’t so obnoxiously-priced, and I’m sure I’m not the only one.

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