Lenovo ThinkPad P52 can swallow a whole 128 GB of RAM

I was actually working at Dell way back in 2001 when the very first Precision mobile workstation came out. At that time, I sneered at the idea of a “mobile workstation.” To me, workstations were massive machines with dual CPUs, SCSI HBAs, and one of these ridiculous things. These days, the mobile workstation is a thriving market segment, and I've seen few laptops that exemplify it better than Lenovo's new ThinkPad P52.

The latest ThinkPad can be configured with both Core i-family and Xeon CPUs. Lenovo doesn't note specifically which chips are on offer, but does say that six-core models will be available. We'd expect this bad boy to make an appearance, along with perhaps this beast. You can pair a Core processor with up to 128 GB of DDR4 memory or slap 64 GB of ECC RAM in a Xeon-based machine.

Lenovo says the standard graphics configuration on the ThinkPad P52 is Nvidia's Quadro P3200. Don't let the relatively low model number fool you; the GP104 chip onboard is just slightly cut down from its full form and packs 1792 shaders. It's connected to 6 GB of GDDR5 memory running at a hair under 9 GT/s across a 192-bit bus. Despite the low board power of 78 W, we expect that the Quadro P3200 should be an impressive performer for its intended tasks.

That Quadro chip will end up connected to 15.6″ displays in 1920×1080 or 3840×2160 resolution. The lower-resolution monitor will splash color on your face at up to 300 cd/m². That display should be able to reproduce 72% of the NTSC color space, a figure that translates to around 100% of sRGB. The fancier 4K UHD screen can get brighter at up to 400 cd/m², and Lenovo says it can light up the entire Adobe RGB color space.

Notably, the P52 only supports solid-state storage. Prospective buyers can purportedly configure it with up to 6 TB of flash, although Lenovo doesn't explain how many devices that requires. If that's not enough, you can hook up external storage to the three USB 3.0 Type-A ports, the two Thunderbolt 3 connections, or use the SD card reader as an impromptu floppy drive. A full-sized HDMI 2.0 port, a mini-DisplayPort 1.4 jack, a 3.5-mm combo audio jack, and a Gigabit Ethernet connector comprise the rest of the external ports.

Given the specs on offer, it's no surprise Lenovo proudly trumpets the ThinkPad 52's VR-readiness. You'll probably want to have it plugged in for that usage, though. While the machine comes with a 90-Whr battery, Lenovo wisely makes no claims about its battery life. The company is also shy about talking prices right now, but we'll find out soon, as the ThinkPad P52 will be available at the end of the month.

Comments closed
    • JustAnEngineer
    • 1 year ago

    What’s the current price for 128 GiB of DDR4-2666 SODIMMs?

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 1 year ago

      I wonder if the other components are really worthy of such a capacity… simply holding 128GB of stuff in RAM isn’t terribly interesting IMO, there is obtaining, transforming and distributing that data as well.

    • FireGryphon
    • 1 year ago

    Gosh, the current P52s looks like a much beefier and less expensive ultrabook than the Dell XPS series. I wonder what the catch is…

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 1 year ago

    Excellent. I have the P51 and am always looking for an upgrade. Going to a 6-core would be great.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 1 year ago

    I got a 1TB spinner in my P51 (along side the SSD). Kind of a shame they drop that cost-effective possibility.

    The big news is in the GPU I say: Quadro P3200 (in P52) vs Quadro M2200 (from [url<]http://www.notebookcheck.net[/url<]) which looks like significantly more GPU, also somewhat more peak watts i theory.

      • thecoldanddarkone
      • 1 year ago

      Yea if you look at the bottom venting and specs that seems likely. That’s not to say it isn’t a welcome upgrade. I venture to say it will be warmer however.

      I like my p51 and won’t be upgrading (lack of funds). Besides it does exactly what I need. Work and some occasional play.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 1 year ago

        I wonder how much extra cooling capacity they’ve added, and if there is correspondingly higher power delivery. It could also be OK if they boost the cooling without dumping more total watts into it. Its not hard to warm up a P51 with a combined CPU & GPU load, in my experience.

        Also, I wonder what they mean with “up to” the P3200, they must plan on two tiers this time. I wonder if that will go so far as to mean different power bricks. If I recall correctly, the P70/71 had/has differing power bricks based on the GPU.

          • thecoldanddarkone
          • 1 year ago

          I think it’s safe to say they will have at least 2 different main loadouts. On the p51 they mainly separated it by Xeon vs i7. Xeon got the m2200 and the i7 got the m1200 (tuned m2000). It’s really weird for me to type that considering they are basically the same processor. The only difference is a few things like ECC.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 1 year ago

            Hmm, I have an M2200 with an i7, not the Xeon.

            Forgot they also had two GPUs on the P51, but now that you mention it, they also had done that on the W530 and I imagine all sorts of similar models before. But the P3200 is a step up in watts over even the M2200, so far as I’ve read.

            • thecoldanddarkone
            • 1 year ago

            You are probably correct, the p3200 is a step in a different direction. Both the m2000 and m2200 were about the same total power output (55). Supposedly the p3200 is 20 watts more.

    • blastdoor
    • 1 year ago

    I’ll wait for the 28 core 5 GHz version.

      • setaG_lliB
      • 1 year ago

      I don’t think that big water chiller would fit in a laptop bag.

        • tacitust
        • 1 year ago

        But it’ll sell like hotcakes in Alaska.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      *Note that this SKU is only available in Siberia.

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