Dell P-series monitors make productivity possible for all

Working with high-resolution multimedia or long bits of code practically demands a giant display with tons of pixels, and gamers these days seemingly can't do without 144-Hz screens with adaptive refresh rates. Dell's latest P-series displays are made for everyday stuff that doesn't really benefit from lightning-fast pixels or eight million colored dots in a single panel. The family includes 22″, 23″, 24″, and 27″ IPS monitors, all sporting the same 1920×1080 resolution. The range of sizes means the P-series works well for office workers with or without the eyes of a teenager.

Goldilocks would have a hard time choosing between the P2319H and P2419H

Dell says the P2219H, P2319H, P2419H, and P2719H all have pixels capable of 8-ms typical response times and 5-ms gray-to-gray response. All four displays claim the same 1000:1 contrast ratio, 60-Hz refresh rate, and 72% coverage of the CIE 1931 color space. We're not sure why Dell chose to express the color space coverage of these 8-bit panels using that metric—the company most likely means 72% of the NTSC color space, or about 100% of sRGB. The three smaller models tout 250 cd/m² of brightness, and Dell says the 27-incher is brighter at 300 cd/m².

All four models get HDMI, DisplayPort, and DVI inputs. The back of the has an upstream USB 3.0 port and a pair of downstream Type-A connectors. Two more USB ports on the side of the display let users add devices without having to reach for the computer itself. All sizes come with versatile stands with height, tilt, and swivel adjustments, plus the ability to switch between landscape and portrait modes. The backs of the monitors have threaded VESA holes in case additional mounting flexibility is needed.

The new P-series monitors are available now. The P2219H costs $230, the P2319H rings in at $260, and the P2419H at $280. The range-topping P21719H sets buyers back $360. Dell previewed the monitor family back at the end of April and told Notebookcheck at the time that additional models called P2219HC, P2419HC, and P2719HC would ship a month later with USB Type-C charging for an attached laptop. Adding the “C” suffix and the 65-W charging capability will add $50-60 to a P-series monitor's price tag, depending on the model.

Comments closed
    • Srsly_Bro
    • 1 year ago

    I have two Dell 27″, one 1440p 144hz and the other 1080p 75hz. In my experience in the workplace in smaller forms, the people (accountants), are ten years behind with tech. Many are fine with 19″ 900p monitors. I found a ball mouse in the supply closet from 2003 this past fall and was asked to use it. I can see why these monitors are 1080p. As a fellow accountant it was impossible to get the firm to upgrade when the benefits of 1080p were communicated, forget about 1440p.

    Perhaps it’s just smaller firms stuck in the past and resistant to change. I worked for a large regional firm before I had to relocate due to family emergency and the firm had two 25″ 1440p Dell’s from 2015 at every workstation.

    Anyone else have experiences to share about tech in the workplace?

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 1 year ago

      Many of my coworkers would find 1440p@25″ too small to see comfortably day-in day-out. I think 1080p @ 24″ is a great sport for the 30″ worker.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        Many did go back to 1080p but I stayed strong and stuck with the 1440p. At the time I had a 1920×1200 monitor that looked terrible after using the higher dpi screens all day.

      • RickyTick
      • 1 year ago

      I recently had someone from Accounting ordering 2 Dell 27″ IPS monitors that were over $800 each. I asked why someone needed an $800 monitor to look at spreadsheets. I was told not to worry about it and order them anyway. 🙁

      Yep, I work in Government.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        There is excellent correlation between the size of the monitor real estate available and worker productivity. If efficiency mattered to you, you would ask why doesn’t everyone have a pair of 1440p displays at their desk.

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          Where is your source because that seems to be a sound argument that may persuade the bean-counters.

          uni-mitation

          • RickyTick
          • 1 year ago

          It wasn’t the size of the monitor that I was questioning. With our Dell Premier pricing, I purchase 27″ monitors all the time for under $300.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          It is interesting considering how much some people get paid, billing-rate, and how much productivity is lost because of low resolution monitors.

          I’m hope the next generation does better.

          • XTF
          • 1 year ago

          Except 27″ 1440p costs about $400 – $500, not $800.

            • RickyTick
            • 1 year ago

            You’re right. It was $800+ for 2 monitors, not each.

        • paulWTAMU
        • 1 year ago

        At my last job I pretty regularly looked at fairly good sized Excel sheets; think 100k rows and 30ish columns.

        Big monitor with good resolution was incredibly useful.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        After graduation and during my job hunting phase, I became acquainted with an owner of a small CPA firm. The front desk had a 17″ 1280×1024 and 22″ 1080p. They were both quite old. The smaller monitor was, of course, used as the main display until I changed it. The people were amazed at the difference.

        I bet working in government is nice.

      • uni-mitation
      • 1 year ago

      Bean-counters, what do you expect? They will not approve such a waste of money unless you justify it with some ROI Excel spreadsheet approximating how this will increase worker productivity. The bean-counters are notoriously conservative for good reason I would say. They take this whole quantify-everything-to-money thing down to an exact cold science. Efficiency is their mandate.

      In other news, bean counters were too cheap to spring for a better quality component that caused the [url=http://time.com/46860/gm-scandal-blame/<] GM Ignition scandal. [/url<] This is the point where we start to wonder whether we really want the bean-counters making such important engineering decisions. I would say "penny-wise, pound foolish" but then again, I got a cheap ass friend (stand-up guy in all other respects) that I swear was a bean counter in prior life. The above represents my views as an outsider that holds these stereotypical views. I may be wrong and the profession has changed. In which case, point me to the nearest one that bleeds red, and not green :D. uni-mitation

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        In my experience it’s the smaller accounting firms that are too ignorant to see the benefits of IT upgrades. I refuse to work for small firms anymore for that reason and others. The bean counters in the large firms see the big picture.

      • Wirko
      • 1 year ago

      Ah, they’ve already done the downgrade from 1280×1024 to 1440×900! (or 1600×900)

      My experience with accountants … older generation though … don’t even start talking about taking those dot matrix printers away from them. The sound keeps them calm, or so it seems.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        When I started I got two brand new 22″ 1080P Dell’s and I had better monitors than all the partners. They wouldn’t know the difference, anyway.

      • Pancake
      • 1 year ago

      A few years back I had a local government client “working” on some crufty old 1024×768 LCD display. I felt so sorry for them I took my old Viewsonic 1280×1024 19″ display in as a donation. You haven’t seen decrepit until you’ve been inside local government. Probably just above them I’d rate Dept of Agriculture.

      • Amiga500+
      • 1 year ago

      I’ve two monitors in work. One is a 26″ 1920×1200 that I was able to spec myself when buying the workstation it came with (which was back in 2010)*.

      The other is a 40″ 4k that I bought myself.

      Quite a few in here have bought their own monitors, be they 27″ HD or 30″ QHD.

      The basic IT dept. supplied monitors are crap 20″ Dells at 1280×1024. Dire. Utterly dire.

      All engineering, so working with spreadsheets, CAD & CAE all the time.

      *That Westmere has since died and been “replaced” with a Dell T7910 [Xeon E5-2630] which I think is a POS. Something in the hardware bottlenecks really badly on big file transfers. Have updated all bios drivers etc but no real change.

        • chuckula
        • 1 year ago

        It’s a well established fact that only 32 core Threadrippers are capable of handling large file transfers. GIT GUD!

          • Amiga500+
          • 1 year ago

          Yeah, its probably not having 1 channel per die thats doing it….

          The poor memory controller doesn’t know what die to direct the data to.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Avoid.

    These are Dell’s cheap-‘n-nasty monitors. For just a few bucks more you can pick up an Ultrasharp (almost perpetually on sale somewhere) and they are [i<]actually[/i<] decent. These monitors exist with overinflated price tags just to trick desktop buyers into thinking they're getting a good deal when they're 'discounted' if bought at the same time as a desktop PC. I'm not saying that these are bad monitors. They're perfectly adequate - it's just that you can get similar quality and features at less than half, sometimes less than a third the list price of these P-series, so finding one on sale at half price really isn't anything other than marketing department trickery.

      • isaacg
      • 1 year ago

      Usually such models do not have USB hubs, height adjustment or more than one or two port options. You get what you pay for. These are great for most business users that aren’t doing high end content creation.

      • XTF
      • 1 year ago

      What’s nasty about the P-series? Image quality?

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        The price.

        As I said, the monitors themselves are okay – Based on the previous generation Pxx17H you get an older/inferior panel to the Ultrasharps. That means lower contrast, lower gamut, cheaper backlighting, lower uniformity and a lack of focus on things like calibration and overdrive for improved pixel response.

        Power-search Newegg for monitors that meet the following criteria:
        A 1080p / non-TN / Height-adjustable / VESA / USB hub

        There are 27″ options starting at $149, not the $360 Dell are suggesting; and 22″ options from $109, not the $230 that Dell are asking for.

        For Dell’s prices on the P-series you can just spend your money far more wisely and end up with a larger model, higher-resolution, higher gamut, built in speakers, freesync – take your pick. The monitor market is absolutely bristling with competition and the P-series can only compete if you halve the price.

          • Chz
          • 1 year ago

          This. I don’t think Dell actually make any *bad* monitors (though my G-sync one definitely makes some odd trade-offs). I’ve always been very happy with mine and I’ve been using them exclusively for well over a decade. But their pricing is a bit random at times. These are all very acceptable screens, you just need to buy them on sale.

          If you’re going to spend serious money on a Dell screen, get an UltraSharp.

            • MileageMayVary
            • 1 year ago

            Dell E Series sucks. Really badly.
            Never used their S line.
            P and U are good, but as Chrispy said, why buy a P Series when Ultrasharps are not much more and routinely on sale? (I bought two 24″ 1080 Ultrasharps for under $200 Newegg sale 2 years ago)

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    P-Series Purportations of Productivity are Potentially Positive!

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      As you get a minus one. Oh, well, have another.

        • Neutronbeam
        • 1 year ago

        Let Chuck alone–we can’t give him back until he’s been housebroken, and that could take a while.

          • uni-mitation
          • 1 year ago

          But he is TR patrimony, Grand Confirmator, and AMD PR Executive Extra-ordinare. It would be an injustice to throw down so much effort down the drain by giving him back!

          uni-mitation

            • auxy
            • 1 year ago

            Because of this post I am now reading all of your posts in the voice of a late-1800s vaudeville or circus crier. (‘ω’)
            [quote=”uni-mitation in my head”<]Come one, come all, come to see the in-CREDIBLE CHUCKULA, TEE-ARR PAT-rimony, Grand Con-firm-ay-tor, and AyyEmDee Pee-Arr Ex-ah-ecutive EXTRA-ordinare![/quote<]

            • Neutronbeam
            • 1 year ago

            He baffles and bewilders, mystifies and astounds!

      • FireGryphon
      • 1 year ago

      This is potentially patronizing, but poo on these putrid posters!

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