Tuesday deals: a 4K IPS display with FreeSync for $340 and more

Howdy, folks. If we had to guess, you're set to leave work early and go on a shopping spree for explosives, if you haven't already. The good ol' Independence Day is coming up, and you should be getting your grills ready for some serious meat charring. That's only happening tomorrow, though. Today, you can take advantage of e-tailers' fourth-of-July PC hardware sales. We've separated Delirium Tremens from Bud Lite to bring you only the best.

  • Whenever the specs “4K” and “IPS” come together in a computer monitor, they're accompanied by a rather large price tag. As you'll see, that's not the case with the Monoprice 32″ 4K HDR IPS Ultra Sim Desktop Monitor (as it's actually named). The relevant specs that aren't in that name are the 250 cd/m² maximum brightness, the 1000:1 static contrast ratio, and FreeSync support. All of that should be more than enough to convince you, and the price is (drum roll, please) only $339.99 at Rakuten with the checkout code SAVE15. Additionally, Monoprice offers a one-year dead pixel guarantee on the display. In the famous words of Owen Wilson, “wow.”

  • Next up, a deal that should be handy for any PC gamer out there. You can get a combo comprising an Intel Core i7-8700K CPU with its six cores, twelve threads, and sky-high clocks, paired with an Asus Prime Z370-A motherboard and its metal-reinforced PCIe slots, two M.2 sockets, Intel-powered Ethernet and Realtek S1220A audio codec. The whole shebang will set you back $479.98 at Newegg, or $40 off the price of both items obtained individually.

  • Everyone likes chaining up combos, so we proceed onto the next package. The box contains an EVGA SuperNova 1000-W power supply accompanied by none other than EVGA's sleek DG-75 case in Alpine White. The PSU has fully-modular cabling, semi-passive cooling, and a twelve-year warranty. Meanwhile, the DG-75 chassis offers tempered-glass front and side panels, support for vertical graphics card mounting, and a fan hub. Newegg will let you have the kit for just $159.99—or the regular price of the power supply alone. Free mid-range case, ahoy!

  • A contemporary build pretty much requires some speedy PCIe-attached storage like the Adata SX6000 512-GB NVMe SSD. This drive should be good for sequential reads as fast as 1000 MB/s and writes up to 800 MB/s. The drive's random I/O figures stand at 100K IOPS for reads and 110K IOPS for writes. You can get this NAND gumstick for just $97.99. That's a price lower than most SATA drives of similar capacity.

  • The final two items are handy accessories with unique purposes. The first one on display is the Corsair Glaive RGB mouse with interchangeable thumb grips, a 16,000-DPI sensor, and RGB LED lighting. For a limited time, Newegg will hand you this rodent for just $49.99 if you use the promo code EMCPWPS45.

  • Lastly, we have a piece of kit that you seriously should have bought by now. You don't want a blackout or brownout to take your data or hardware with it, and for that purpose you'll want the CyberPower CP1000AVRLCD UPS. This unit's 1000-VA of capacity and 600-W output  should be plenty to power nearly any build and its associated peripherals for a good long while. Additional niceties include an LCD display, AVR, and a three-year warranty. This juice pack can be obtained from Newegg for $84.95 with the promo code EMCPWPS56.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • djayjp
    • 1 year ago

    IPS is actually bad. You want VA. The whole idea with HDR is to have a wide contrast ratio.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      Yep.

      IPS zealots will continue to rave about better colour accuracy and viewing angles, but that’s a outdated viewpoint that ignores heavy investment in VA technology by both Samsung and AUO over the last half decade.

      Many VA panels now offer competitive viewing angles, colour accuracy, and response times whilst offering major advantages over IPS in terms of static contrast, corner-glow, panel uniformity, backlight bleed, curvature, and refresh rates.

      I believe that the very best IPS panel on the market is probably better than the very best VA panel on the market, so I’m not in denial; It’s simply expensive and difficult to make a good IPS panel because extra polarising filters are required to eliminate corner-glow, and these come at a cost to brightness and thus static contrast ratio. Even the slightest bit of uneven pressure on an IPS panel during assembly results in a visible flaw, and ‘curved’ IPS panels without uniformity and backlight issues are practically nonexistent.

      By comparison, VA is extremely tolerant of being bent and warped. A cheap VA panel can have almost zero backlight bleed and even edge-lit VA panels can produce better uniformity than the majority of the IPS monitors on the market. The vast majority of the market is in affordable monitors, so for the vast majority of people a VA monitor will be significantly better than an IPS monitor.

        • djayjp
        • 1 year ago

        Though the very best IPS still won’t be able to match the very best VA panel in terms of contrast ratio. Actually I bet the very best IPS can’t even match a budget VA panel for contrast.

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          I wasn’t talking about contrast ratio, you’re misquoting that. I was talking about overall, taking everything into account including response, accuracy, uniformity etc. When it comes solely to contrast ratios you are right.

          The best IPS contrast ratio I’ve ever seen is about 1350:1
          The worst VA contrast ratio I’ve ever seen is about 1800:1

          There’s simply no overlap, especially when you consider that IPS contrast ratio is measured at the center of the screen and even on that 1350:1 panel, I suspect the off-angle contrast was closer to 500:1 instead.

            • djayjp
            • 1 year ago

            Yes you’re right, I misread you. And agreed on that figure!

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            AUO have started producing 4K, high-refresh, VA panels. I’m curious to see how much they actually cost without the exceptionally expensive and hardware-heavy Gsync-HDR and FALD backlight, as per the Asus and Acer that use that combination.

            BOM costs of the Asus PG27UQ indicate that the Gsync-HDR FPGA cost around $500 (BOM cost, not retail cost) and there’s easily another $300 of DDR4 and support hardware. Add the FALD costs and all of the pointless gamer bling like RGBLED sync and decorative LED logo projectors and the actual [i<]panel[/i<] isn't too much of the ridiculous overall cost. Factor in the early adopter tax to those >$2000 monitors and we might actually have 4K HDR Freesync for $500 by the end of this year. Optimistic? Yes, but not impossible.

            • djayjp
            • 1 year ago

            That’s crazy. Well if you look at the TV space, you can get FALD VA units for about $500 retail. And Samsung has just started enabling freesync (1 tho) to a bunch of their TVs. Once HDMI 2.1 hits shortly that’ll be the time. Though not sure how SRGB colour space is vs HD. Supposedly the gamma is slightly different. Of course input lag and display lag are more a concern with TVs too.

            • snarfbot
            • 1 year ago

            Not only that but many TV’s can also do 2560×1440@120hz.

            Next year with hdmi 2.1 well probably see TV’s that do 120hz at their native resolution.

            Monitors are sort of behind the curve it’s a bad time to be in the market for one.

        • exilon
        • 1 year ago

        The latest generation of Samsung VA is still awful.

        Awful 40ms black to anything transition times,
        awful grey uniformity due to the curve (on every monitor!),
        awful VA glow due to 200% rise in black level for each 7 degrees off center… forget corner glow, everything not centered glows!

        I had one, and it went straight back to the store.

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          There may be truth to what you say. Whilst prad.de and tftcentral.co.uk prove that there are definitely some excellent Samsung VA panels, it’s interesting that my last Samsung VA monitor used an AUO panel!

    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    Newegg also has the A data SX8200 480GB for $130

    • tay
    • 1 year ago

    Why would I not get this instead if I lived near a MicroCenter? Should I?
    [url<]http://www.microcenter.com/product/507788/32UD59-B_32_4K_UHD_60Hz_HDMI_DP_LED_Monitor_Refurbished[/url<] Considering this as an option too [url<]http://www.microcenter.com/product/502867/ED347CKR_34_UW-QHD_100Hz_DVI_HDMI_DP_FreeSync_Curved_LED_Monitor[/url<]

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 1 year ago

      The 300 nits brightness is a nice boost over the 250 in the article above. Having had two monitors with different brightness side by side for a few years, I can say that brightness will cause people to perceive a difference in image quality.

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 1 year ago

      With the first link, you’re comparing a new monitor to a refurb. Similar specs, $50 price difference. It doesn’t seem to support HDR, but it can go brighter than the Monoprice. I’d go Monoprice, but it’s probably a tossup for a lot of people at ~15% discount.

      Second option is more expensive, not HDR, not even 4K res, and ultrawide/curved. Unless you have a hardon for ultrawide/curved it’s not really compelling. I’d pass.

      In terms of image quality, HDR, good panel (IPS), variable refresh, resolution, and high refresh rate are the main differentiators these days. While HDR isn’t universally supported, it’s amazing and becoming more widespread. Given the lifetime of monitors, it’s a pretty good idea to require it from now on.

        • tay
        • 1 year ago

        Good points thank you. 100 Hz is nice and compelling.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 1 year ago

      I have something similar to this

      [url<]http://www.microcenter.com/product/502867/ED347CKR_34_UW-QHD_100Hz_DVI_HDMI_DP_FreeSync_Curved_LED_Monitor[/url<] by Viotek [url<]https://www.amazon.com/GN34C-Monitor-Widescreen-Definition-DisplayPort/dp/B074G5G8FT/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1530641983&sr=8-3&keywords=viotek+34+inch+curved+monitor[/url<] Monitor prices are definitely coming down from last winter.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Go get it then, bro. U srs?

    • dragontamer5788
    • 1 year ago

    Monoprice had a recent mixup where they messed up the labeling of their monitors: [url<]https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/8pp5tb/monoprice_ahvatn_apology_and_offer/[/url<] Its a bit of reddit drama, but clearly Monoprice is trying to make amends now. If the specs come back and they're actually as advertised, then its certainly a good deal!

      • brucethemoose
      • 1 year ago

      Monoprice is still one of my favorite brands.

      Among other things, the DVI cable I bought from them is the most over-engineered cable I’ve ever held. It has so much copper/padding that it’s heavy and will barely bend, and it was dirt cheap!

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