Samsung mass-produces fifth-gen V-NAND with over 90 layers

Samsung has delivered another salvo in the race to ever-increasing NAND flash density and performance. The company has begun mass production of its fifth-generation V-NAND memory with “over 90” (likely 96) layers per die.

Samsung claims this new V-NAND is the industry's first to use the Toggle DDR 4.0 interface standard, allowing for transfer speeds of 1.4 Gbps. Samsung says this rate is up 40% over 64-layer V-NAND. The company also says that data write speeds are down to 500 microseconds, or a 30% improvement over 64-layer V-NAND, while read response time is “significantly reduced to 50 microseconds.”

Even with this NAND's higher transfer rates and improved performance characteristics, Samsung says the power consumption of fifth-generation V-NAND should remain similar to that of the 64-layer stuff. Operating voltage has fallen from 1.8 V to 1.2 V.

Despite the increased complexity of these dies, Samsung says manufacturing productivity (yield) is 30% better thanks to improved deposition techniques. That manufacturing tech also allowed the company to shrink the cell layer height of the V-NAND structure by 20%.

The initial device to use this 96-layer V-NAND is a 256-Gb (32-GB) die. Samsung says its plans for the memory also include quad-level-cell and 1-Tb dies. The company says it will be rapidly ramping fifth-generation V-NAND production to supply customers in supercomputing, data center, and smartphone applications.

Comments closed
    • Tristan
    • 1 year ago

    lol, 96 layers means almost whole wafer on single chip.

    • blastdoor
    • 1 year ago

    Amateurs. These guys know how to stack chips:

    [url<]https://www.quora.com/How-many-potato-chips-are-really-in-a-can-of-Pringles[/url<]

    • Wirko
    • 1 year ago

    [url=https://techreport.com/review/33135/samsung-860-pro-1-tb-solid-state-drive-reviewed<]TR said[/url<] that Anand said that Samsung said that 96 would be the number. If they managed to stack so many without layers collapsing then it's 96; otherwise it's 91.

      • blastdoor
      • 1 year ago

      Turtles all the way down

      • demolition
      • 1 year ago

      Perhaps it does have 96 layers but to increase yield they will disable a number of them and end up with fewer than 96 layers where the actual number is yet to be determined depending on the failure rate of those dies? Not an unknown practice in CPUs/GPUs/etc.

        • nico1982
        • 1 year ago

        Genuine question: can you disabled single layers in a V-NAND? Or do you lose all the ones above the disabled layer?

          • Waco
          • 1 year ago

          I think it depends on if the TSV/addressing circuits were damaged or not.

    • just brew it!
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]That manufacturing tech also allowed the company to shrink the cell layer height of the V-NAND structure by 20%.[/quote<] Hopefully this doesn't mean we're in for a reprise of the cell voltage drift issues we had when they tried to shrink planar TLC cells too far.

      • UberGerbil
      • 1 year ago

      It’s ok if you lose a bit here and there, because they make it up in volume. 😉

        • K-L-Waster
        • 1 year ago

        What’s a megabit between friends?

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      I could be wrong, but wasn’t V-NAND all based on easy-to-manufacture, reliable, drift-free 20nm process?

      They didn’t have to process shrink any more, they just build up more layers instead. Process shrinks are expensive and risky, Samsung found an exit strategy with 3D NAND adding layers and they’re not going to go back to process shrinks until they’ve exhausted layer progress.

        • HERETIC
        • 1 year ago

        The 850 EVO was on 40nm-
        [url<]https://techreport.com/review/27464/samsung-850-evo-solid-state-drive-reviewed[/url<]

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          D’oh, you’re right. It’s 40nm not 20nm.

          But we’re still on 40nm, right?

            • just brew it!
            • 1 year ago

            Probably. But the article says they’re shrinking the height of the layers.

            And the 840 EVO was using some stupid-small planar TLC geometry which contributed to the issues with that model.

            • willmore
            • 1 year ago

            There are two layer heights, aren’t there? The layers with the cells on it and the insulating layers between then. IIRC from the diagrams (probably not to scale), the insulating layers were several times larger. If they’re shrinking those (which would give the largest benefit) then there’s unlikely to be any performance impact.

            Guesses, guesses….

            • HERETIC
            • 1 year ago

            It’s hard to find information the don’t want to tell you.
            Iv’e seen 30nm mentioned a few times.
            What the competition uses seems to be well hidden as well,
            Iv’e read 20nm a few times-but hey??????????????

      • rnalsation
      • 1 year ago

      I’ve had voltage drift issues with my Samsung 830 ([s<]SLC[/s<]MLC) on some several year old files. So either Samsung has voltage drift issues or any drive just needs to be refreshed given enough time. Edit:Thanks for the MLC correction Srsly_Bro.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        830 would have been the smallest planar process Samsung ever made, before they gave up on die shrinks and moved to 3D NAND instead.

        Voltage drift is more likely to happen the smaller the process, though Samsung seem to have more issues with it than other brands. Perhaps pushing the envelope a bit too far.

          • HERETIC
          • 1 year ago

          Nah-The 830 was listed as 2xnm-possibly as high as 28nm.
          The 840 followed at 21nm, then the 840 EVO at 19nm,and 750 at 16nm.
          The 750 gets the crown there.
          Sammy then went to 3D with the 850 series.

          Those are the main series-There was a EDIT 650 as well……

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        [url<]https://www.anandtech.com/show/4863/the-samsung-ssd-830-review[/url<] Which version do you have? I have the 830 256gb and it's mlc.

          • rnalsation
          • 1 year ago

          I 100% misremembered and didn’t bother to look it up. Thanks.

    • nico1982
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]The company has begun mass production of its fifth-generation V-NAND memory with "over 90" (likely 96) layers per die.[/quote<] That would be "almost 100 layers" 😛 Fake edit: OK, it depends on rounding mode...

      • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
      • 1 year ago

      Really, they should come back when it’s over 9000.

        • willmore
        • 1 year ago

        In before “Well, aksully…”

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      0.1K V-NAND has a nice rig to it.

      • Redocbew
      • 1 year ago

      In CEO math there is no rounding mode. Real men do not approximate.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Ah I was hoping for 91 layers. No thanks.

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