Cooler Master makes gaming mice affordable with its $30 CM310

RGB LEDs have become too popular for any peripheral maker to ignore at any price point, and Cooler Master is bringing an entry-level blinkenlights option to its peripheral range today with the CM310 gaming mouse. This dazzling rodent takes an everything-you-need-and-nothing-you-don't approach to gaming. Its ambidextrous design boasts two thumb buttons, two main buttons, a clickable scroll wheel, and dedicated DPI-switching buttons.

Inside the CM310's rubberized body, an as-yet-undocumented Pixart A3328 optical sensor can step through resolutions ranging from 500 DPI to a nigh-useless 10,000 DPI. Cooler Master does suggest this sensor is capable of tracking under movement speeds as fast as 60 inches per second or acceleration of 20 g.

The RGB LED complement on this mouse illuminates a strip around its profile, the Cooler Master logo on its rump, and the scroll wheel. The company says budding gamers can select from five pre-baked RGB LED lighting effects during the course of their epic wins. The CM310 should be available today for $30 on Amazon and Newegg, though product pages haven't popped up for it just yet.

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    • elites2012
    • 1 year ago

    i have only owned 2 companies gaming mice. the logitech g400s and the mouse that comes with the devastator 2 kb/mouse combo. they work just fine for what we use them for.

    • modulusshift
    • 1 year ago

    Hey old-timers, a moment of your consideration: is the re-released MX Master series as good as the old ones? I’ve heard certain groups of people talk about the old MX Masters as lost legends much as you all seem to hold the MX518. Though maybe the difference is in the price range that you all are discussing? I definitely feel that random mice shoved into cupboards from the mid-2000s are usually tons better in their dilapidated state than anything you can buy at Walmart.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      My MX Anywhere 2 (not the 2S) is feels robust enough actually; Although the plastics are on the brittle side it doesn’t creak like other mice, and it’s weighty (that’ll be the battery) which at least provides the [i<]illusion[/i<] of quality. My biggest dislike of the MX range is that they can't middle-click the wheel. Their gimmicky free-scroll wheel annoys me because long before Logitech came up with that daft idea, most operating systems and browsers had refined autoscroll to the point that Logitech's bastardisation of the middle button is utterly pointless. What it does do is rob the mouse of one of the most important buttons (it's why middle-click is mouse3 and not mouse4 or mouse5). Some people might like it, but I find myself occasionally mis-clicking even after two years - both forgetting that middle-click doesn't work on the MX, and then tapping a place on other mice that doesn't have the button I was forced to rebind mouse3 to on the MX.

      • demolition
      • 1 year ago

      I loved the MX518 but the MX Master just isn’t compatible with my hand. I would get cramps after less than a minute. I think it is because it is too large so it doesn’t work with my fingertip grip but was made for people who uses a palm grip.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Good, I think. As long as the sensor doesn’t suck.

    I could be wrong, but I used to buy a lot of mice (very picky about 1:1 linear tracking and many mice claimed to be but weren’t) and these days they all feel nastier and cheaper than they ever used to, whilst simultaneously being 2-3x the price.

    Part of that is simply inflation over the last 20 years, and part of that is the focus on RGBLED and silly RGBLED control software instead of, you know… SPENDING THE MONEY ON THE ACTUAL GODDAMN MOUSE HARDWARE.

    But hey, if even Logitech are charging double for a cheap and nasty piece of hardware, why shouldn’t everyone else jump on that bandwagon?

    Come on Coolermaster. You’re the benchmark for “affordable, but not awful”

      • stdRaichu
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]Part of that is simply inflation over the last 20 years, and part of that is the focus on RGBLED and silly RGBLED control software instead of, you know... SPENDING THE MONEY ON THE ACTUAL GODDAMN MOUSE HARDWARE. But hey, if even Logitech are charging double for a cheap and nasty piece of hardware, why shouldn't everyone else jump on that bandwagon?[/quote<] I don't think you're alone. I don't do much in the way of twitch gaming but I'm still picky about quality; I've still got two Logitech MX518's and two G400S's brand new in their boxes because, after those mice, the entire peripherals industry appeared to vanish completely up its own fundament. The MX518 I'm holding as I click submit must have seen over a decade's worth of constant usage by now. Even if you pay through the nose I've still not seen anything that matches them for ergonomics or build quality, and everything in the last few years is even worse with being needlessly festooned in RGB. Blech.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Yeah, mid-priced mice made before about 2010 have a feel of quality, right?

        Where did that go. I’m not asking for miracles, I just want:

        [list<][*<]a sensor that doesn't suck [/*<][*<](the) five generic windows mouse buttons [/*<][*<]something that doesn't creak and flex from low-grade materials and poor manufacturing tolerances.[/*<][/list<] Some of the Logitech/Microsoft/Zowie/Roccat stuff these days feels like it belongs in the same category as happy meal toys, and these aren't even the low-budget brands. I *do* get that these gaming mice at north of $50 spend the money on the sensor, but that doesn't mean that ALL of the money should go on the sensor. It has to not feel like jank in my hand, too.

          • stdRaichu
          • 1 year ago

          [quote<]Yeah, mid-priced mice made before about 2010 have a feel of quality, right?[/quote<] Yup. I'd been a happy user of my MX518 for years, worried about it getting a bit long in the tooth around 2010, started looking for alternatives and found... nothing. Well, apart from some unopened MX518 and the near-enough-identical G400S which came out a couple of years afterwards. Hence why I bought up extra stock like some crazy hoarder and guard them jealously. "Gamer" gear at twice the price, including from logitech, just doesn't cut the mustard. Flimsy, creaky shells, squishy switches and oversized imprecise scrollwheels seem to be the order of the [s<]day[/s<] decade 🙁

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 1 year ago

            I unboxed my last new (old stock) MX518 a few years ago. When it wears out, I’ll probably get aLogitech gaming mouse to replace it.

            • demolition
            • 1 year ago

            When I needed a replacement for my MX518 (many years ago) I obviously wanted another MX518 however that was no longer possible. I ended up with a Logitech G302 which I also think is a great mouse. Tracks nicely on all surfaces, good ergonomics and very precise and tactile buttons. Price was also decent and it was void of most of the modern useless features except for a pulsating light (RGB controllable). Lucklily the pulsating light can be disabled.
            After countless hours of gaming, the G302 ended up developing the typical double-clicking button, but since it was still covered by warranty I created a ticket with the seller to get it replaced. Since the G302 was no longer in production (sigh!) I could freely choose another mouse in the same price level and I didn’t even had to return the faulty G302.. I ended up getting another Logitech mouse (Pro Gaming) but it was not nearly as nice as my G302. I found that it shared the same microswitches which I then transplanted to the G302 so it got a new lease of life. 🙂
            I also transferred the USB cable from the new mouse since it was nylon sleeved while the G302 just had a plain ol’ rubber cable, so I think I made the G302 even better.
            So is the G302 better than the MX518 it replaced? I actually think it is, at least in my hand.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 1 year ago

            I used similar tricks to keep my father’s original Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer going for a decade after it had been discontinued.

            I was very recently given a Razer DeathAdder. If the MX518 gives up, I’ll try that for a while.

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 1 year ago

            I heard rumors the Intellimouse is coming back.

            • Star Brood
            • 1 year ago

            I’ve got the DeathAdder and it is hot sex in my hand. The side buttons i just avoid though.

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            My $55 G302 creaks when I squeeze it. My G9x didn’t nor does my Microsoft Wheel Mouse Optical. Not only is that my daily driver at work, it is a $20 mouse I bought in 2003 and use for 9 hours a day, 240 days a year.

          • Spunjji
          • 1 year ago

          Another person here feeling glad I’m not the only one with this suspicion… or a still-working MX518.

          I had a Roccat Tyon and it was the single worst decision I have ever made on a mouse purchase. Not just for the 300 useless buttons, or the stupid drivers that registered it as a game pad, or even the two-minute delay after changing basic settings in the software while the mouse did… stuff. No, mostly because after a solid 9 months of use the right mouse button developed a no-click/double-click issue and Roccat refused warranty service because they didn’t like the receipt I had.

          Problem is, the 518 is too low-sensitivity for me these days. I want a better sensor and none of the other shite. This looks like a fair approximation of that; assuming it’s not built from recycled yoghurt-pots.

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            +1 just for ‘recycled yoghurt-pots’

          • synthtel2
          • 1 year ago

          Zowie’s in that category since when?

          I guess my EC2-A creaks a bit if I squeeze it really hard, but that takes way more force than it sees in normal use, and it seems like a reasonable tradeoff for its light weight. Maybe a 90-odd gram mouse is always going to feel cheap in certain ways compared to a 120-odd gram mouse, but that doesn’t mean a 90 gram mouse can’t be good.

        • Spunjji
        • 1 year ago

        Thanks for the reminder on the G400S. Just bought one second-hand for £20, if any bits are dodgy I’ll replace them with spares from my MX518 😀

      • Stochastic
      • 1 year ago

      Take a look at this: [url<]http://www.rocketjumpninja.com/top-40/[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        That’s a good video but he doesn’t really touch on build quality at all.

        He does say that anything over 100g in weight is too heavy to call a gaming mouse these days, so perhaps there’s the problem; If mice need to be under 100g, brittle, thin plastic and fragile lightweight parts are why they all feel so terrible.

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