Thursday deals: a Ryzen 5 2600X for $189 and more

How's it going, folks? Motherboards bearing AMD's revamped B450 chipset have begun hitting e-tailers everywhere, ready to take in often-discounted Ryzen 2000-series CPUs. We've already covered Gigabyte's range of offerings, and we'll be shortly taking a look at models from Asus and MSI, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, check out our review of Corsair's great H100i Pro CLC, or, of course, check out our selection of deals below.

  • Our leading piece today is the Ryzen 5 2600X. This processor got an Editor's Choice award back when we reviewed it, and it's still one of our top picks today for a mid-range system thanks for its combination of six cores, twelve threads, and a healthy 3.9-GHz boost clock. It comes packed with a capable AMD Wraith Spire cooler, and it'll set you back a mere $188.99 at Amazon. That's an insane price for a CPU of this caliber.

  • Pretty much all contemporary desktop processors can benefit from speedy RAM sticks. Conveniently, we've procured some for you. The G.Skill Trident Z 16-GB pair of DIMMs clocked at 3200 MT/s is a sleek, fast kit, and it'll set you back only $159.99 at Newegg. That cash wouldn't even let you smell RAM this fast until recently.

  • If the CPU above is a little too rich for your blood, how about a combo deal with a Ryzen 5 2400G and an Asus ROG Strix B350-F motherboard? This Editor's-Choice-winning chip is a great idea for people looking to build a capable entry-level gaming system or perhaps a speedy HTPC on a budget. The accompanying mobo is rather sleek and comes with USB 3.1 Gen2 ports, Intel-powered Ethernet, and a souped-up Realtek S1220A audio codec. Newegg will hand you both items in exchange for $229.98, or $60 off the regular total.

  • Feeling like having a jolt of Coffee Lake instead? Right this way, ma'am. Asus' TUF B360-Pro Gaming Wi-Fi mobo has two M.2 sockets, two USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports, and Intel-powered Ethernet and 802.11ac Wi-Fi. The TUF mobo lineup has an emphasis on reliability, too. This board will set you back just $99.99 at Newegg with the code EMCPWEY49.

  • If you're a fan of high-resolution displays, there's little reason to not get a mighty 4K monitor these days, like the LG 32UD59-B. This slab o' pixels has a VA panel capable of display a whopping 95% of the DCI-P3 color space. The maximum brightness is a healthy-for-this-size 300 cd/m², and the contrast ratio is 3000:1. There's FreeSync support on tap, too, along with built-in speakers and a height-adjustable stand.  Take one of these home for $369.99 from Newegg with the promo code EMCXPWEY3.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Good grief. What a deal compared to $340 for a top-model mainstream 4C/8T i7 we had to live with for ages before Ryzen came along.

    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231878<]This DDR4-3000 CL15 kit for $150[/url<] caught my eye. What's the verdict on MHz vs CL relationship? Every CL step up is equal to a step down in MHz? If true, then this kit would perform similarly to the DDR4-3200 CL16 kit listed above, right? Also, perhaps with Ryzen's sub-par RAM compatibility, you'd have a higher probability of running a DDR4-3000 kit at it's rated speed than a DDR4-3200 kit? Or is 3200MHz largely solved with at least 2nd-gen Ryzen?

      • homerdog
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]What's the verdict on MHz vs CL relationship? Every CL step up is equal to a step down in MHz?[/quote<] 3000MHz/CL15 and 3200MHz/CL16 have the exact same latency. Not sure if that answers your question.

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        3200 > 3000
        16 > 15

        So yeah get the 3200 kit. It’s got higher numbers so it’s better.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      I believe (I’ve been told by others when mentioning it in the past) that even 1st-gen Ryzen compatibility is solved for 3200MHz now.

      I had issues with 3000MHz when I built our Ryzen machines here but that was within a couple of months of launch and so I haven’t gone higher than low-latency 2666MHz since. Apparently AGESA updates only a few months after launch meant that pretty much any 3200MHz RAM was compatible, and you are welcome to try your luck up to about DDR-4000.

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        Is that true for single rank and dual rank DIMMs?

      • Zizy
      • 1 year ago

      AFAIK Ryzen scales nicely up to about 2800, then bandwidth doesn’t matter much and only the latency does.
      Note that the relevant latency measure is the time in nanoseconds, not cycles. 3200 CL16 has exactly the same “data started arriving” as the 3000 CL15, but the first block is finished a bit faster in the 3200 (due to higher bandwidth), so it is actually even slightly better in terms of latency – even though it might look worse on the first glance.
      (ignoring the tiny detail that there are many other numbers measuring latency…)

    • Pancake
    • 1 year ago

    And if you want to game you’re still better off with an i5-8400 (according to this here august website).

    Womp! Womp!

      • ronch
      • 1 year ago

      Intel may still give you more frames per second but I think once your game runs above 100 fps with either Intel or AMD it doesn’t matter so much anymore even with high refresh rate monitors. But the thing is though, when it comes to productivity apps that make use of all cores and threads the i5 is totally left behind. So the bottomline is, when the Ryzen loses, it’s not really noticeable all that much (unless you’re really scrutinizing it) and when it wins, it’s noticeable in terms of wait times. So yeah, Ryzen may be the Smarter Choice.

        • Pancake
        • 1 year ago

        That’s a nice theory. The one flaw in it is that people aren’t buying these chips (i5-8400 and Ryzen 2600X) for productivity apps – at least not in the first world. If your charge out rate is $100-200/hr then you’re going to be buying something more serious and most likely Intel because that’s what professionals mostly use.

        These chips are for gamers and home use and they both serve very well for that use case. Which is why AMD has to sell it at such a low price. It’s slower than an i5-8400 for gaming and that’s the cruel, cruel reality of its market position.

        The market has spoken.

      • jovian_litany
      • 1 year ago

      I sense much fear in you. When gaming is the ONLY reason to buy a processor and you are challenged on every other front, people are going to jump ship for a less expensive system. I remember the P4 athlon xp days and the P3/P4 Athlon days. This smells much the same. The market will change my friend until Intel loses its Hubris.

        • Pancake
        • 1 year ago

        Why should I fear anything? I neither work for Intel nor AMD or have stocks in either company.

        What I actually have is quite the opposite – being relaxed and comfortable. With my new quad-core Intel powered HP Envy 13 ultrabook. The battery lasts forever! In the olden days I would go to clients and the first thing I would do is ask where I could plug in my laptop. So uncool. But everyone did it. As I would still be doing if I had bought a Ryzen Mobile laptop. I don’t even care about getting on a cross-continent flight. It is so good.

        The problem with your logic is that people AREN’T jumping at Ryzen systems. Which is why fairly shortly after release the Ryzen 2600X has a $50 cut to its price. That can’t be good for AMD.

        I only offer unbiased impartial views on the IT/tech industry from years as an observer. Sometimes the truth hurts…

        Womp! Womp!

    • blastdoor
    • 1 year ago

    That’s all nice.

    I’m waiting for Threadripper 2.

      • willmore
      • 1 year ago

      I’m waiting for memory prices to drop. ;(

        • Ryhadar
        • 1 year ago

        Same.

        • dragontamer5788
        • 1 year ago

        They are dropping. Seems like 16GB kits are roughly $15 cheaper than they were just a few months ago.

          • willmore
          • 1 year ago

          Now I wait for the rest of the 2x overpricing…

        • blastdoor
        • 1 year ago

        I hear ya…

        I’ve just so overdue for an upgrade of my main processing machine, I can’t really wait much longer.

        • tacitust
        • 1 year ago

        At least, if you’re building a new system, the recent drop in SSD prices helps somewhat — if you stay away from the seductive lure of NVMe, that is…

        • ptsant
        • 1 year ago

        I noticed 2x16GB prices dropping (same store, same kit) by about $40, from $400 to $360 (EU prices).

        By the way, prices for the RX580 have dropped absurdly. I can now find the 8GB model at $250 (again, EU price), which less than half the peak of the cryptomining craze. Waiting for Vega to drop and nVidia launches.

    • lilbug4apet
    • 1 year ago

    The Ryzen 5 2600x actually comes with the Wraith Spire cooler .

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