Corsair H75 liquid cooler gets fresh fans and a fresh face

In the wake of the Hydro Series H100i Pro it launched last week, Corsair has updated another one of its perennially-popular closed-loop liquid CPU coolers. The H75 is the latest to get an upgrade to Corsair's latest pump and fan designs. This 120-mm cooler boasts a white-LED-illuminated pump head, braided coolant lines, and a squared-off radiator to keep up with Corsair's latest.

The H75 sports two Corsair SP120 120-mm fans in a push-pull configuration, so it could offer higher cooling performance than the single-fan H60 that debuted earlier this year. The cold plate and pump head design of the H75 is slightly different than that of the H60, too, so the changes between the coolers could be more than skin deep.

The SP120 fans both offer PWM control with a 600-RPM-to-1900-RPM range, so builders should have no trouble finding a fan curve that balances quiet operation at idle and high performance under load. Corsair includes mounting hardware for Intel LGA 115x, LGA 2011, and LGA 2066 sockets, as well as AMD AM3 and AM4 brackets. The updated H75 is available now on Amazon for $90.

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    • exilon
    • 1 year ago

    These AIOs are so dependent on high static pressure fans that I’m surprised that they’re not using the ML120s. Maybe internal testing shows that the SP120s are just better. Hmm…

    Though in either case, I was not very impressed with SP120 fans when I had them. Gentle Typhoons or the new A12x25 should roast them in performance and noise.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    I still don’t see the point of 120mm radiators. The surface area of the radiator is no larger than an affordable 120mm tower cooler, but the fin density means that the fans are louder, there’s the added cost and complexity, pump noise, risk of leaks and failures, plus the added bulk of the hoses to deal with.

    The one scenario that this might be useful for is a super-cramped mITX build where something intrudes into the CPU socket area. The problem with those builds is that they are unlikely to have enough room for a 120mm radiator and even if you can fit one you may be removing the only 140mm fan in the entire system, significantly worsening the airflow to more heat-critical components like GPUs that are potentially needing twice the cooling of a CPU in the first place.

    My only experience with (the old) H75 just had me wondering how something so stupid and pointless had made it to market. It was noisy, cumbersome, and cooled worse than the smaller/cheaper/more reliable/quieter/simpler Noctua 120mm tower that I was using. 120mm radiators can’t work miracles, and quite honestly the quartet of $1 heatpipes in even a low-cost heatsink are more than capable of transferring enough heat to the fins that the size of the fin stack is the bottleneck, not the method of getting the heat out of the CPU.

      • Spunjji
      • 1 year ago

      I found one use for 120mm radiators, which is cooling a GPU. The heat capacity of the water helps immensely in maintaining a stable temperature under load, while the acoustics of a pair of 120mm fans in push-pull easily beat out any GPU air cooler out there.

      A few years back I used a system built like that to squeeze a pair of GTX 980s into all sorts of odd, cramped M-ATX cases. Having mastered that one I dialled down to a single short-board GTX 970 and got it into a Li PC-Q33.

      The humongous problem I therefore have with all of these endless refreshes of their 120mm AIO loops is that they provide no way for the enterprising modder to mount them to a GPU where they’d actually be useful. Boo, I say.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 1 year ago

      Cases with 120mm fan mounts. A 140mm radiator wouldn’t fit.

      I agree that if 140 fits it will be superior, but can’t blame the manufacturer for try to target customers whose cases preclude using them.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        True, but the list of cases that support 120mm radiators and yet not 240mm radiators must be tiny.

          • Hsldn
          • 1 year ago

          I own a Corsair 600T case, it was a very populer case 3-4 years ago. 120mm radiators are the only ones that fit.
          Of course I can change the case but my current rig is quite fine , works without a problem and changing a case is too much work .

          It’s not like they are abandoning the 140mm radiators, they are just releasing another product for another customer group.

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            Uh, [i<]no[/i<] - 120mm radiators are not the only ones that fit. The 600T is compatible with Corsair's own 240mm radiator. It says so on their webpage for the 600T! Additionally, "600T watercooling" on google image search shows plenty of 600T mounting options. Admittedly the 360mm and 280mm options required modding but there's an un-modded 600T with a 120mm, a 240mm and a 200mm radiator all simultaneously running in a custom loop.

      • G8torbyte
      • 1 year ago

      I had an H60 AIO unit that operated OK for about three years then the pump must have failed as it caused my system to shutdown from heat spiking. Anyway I agree that a large case with space may be better served by a a good heatsink air cooler. I switched back to a CoolerMaster 212 and it is quieter and cooling as good if not better.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 1 year ago

      The main benefit to me is heat exhaustion out of the case immediately. That helps with other cards like GPU’s not pulling hot air into their HSF.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        That’s a valid reason I can get behind, though still in 90% of the cases that these things are installed, any air cooler they replace would be exhausting hot air directly at a rear case fan (if not also multiple top case fans). For hot exhaust air to go anywhere near a GPU requires a long hard look at what’s wrong with the rest of the fans in your case 😉

      • dragontamer5788
      • 1 year ago

      They seem to be an upgrade to Dell cases (ex: Dell Gaming Inspiron Desktops). You don’t have room for a large air cooler or a 240mm radiator. The 120mm or 140mm radiators seem like the best you can do.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        So true.

        I think the mistake there would already have been made with “Inspiron” and “Gaming” in the same sentence since those are often supplied with PSUs too meagre to handle a decent GPU and even if it wasn’t, the case airflow isn’t really designed to handle a 200W+ GPU either.

        I was disgusted when a Studio XPS came in with a fried PSU. It was a 375W PSU with only one 6-pin connector. Someone had blown the PSU trying to run a 150W GTX 660Ti because that PSU wouldn’t even have qualified as 80+ bronze, it was pure junk in every way. I was about to swap in another PSU when I discovered that the entire PSU was proprietary; The motherboard didn’t use a common 20+4 pin and an ATX power supply wouldn’t fit in the bay. A quick search said that I could buy a 550W Dell replacement for €175 (Seasonic 80+ gold fully-modular would have been around €85). It seemed like a smarter move to junk the Dell XPS case, dead Dell PSU and perfectly working motherboard – since those three items could be replaced for around the same money, but with a better PSU and motherboard as the end result.

        Of course the warranty was only one year; Dell want ridiculous money for warranty upgrades.

        Don’t get me wrong, I like Dell in the Enterprise/corporate space but like most big OEMs, their home desktops that aren’t horrendously overpriced are pure garbage.

      • MOSFET
      • 1 year ago

      I have two H80i’s and while they perform better than the H75, I generally agree with you, Chrispy_. The CLCs perform exactly the same as a large air cooler, and make more noise while doing so. Thanks to the AM3+ cooler compatibility on Asus X370 boards, I brought back the Thermaltake Frio 120 from my pre-CLC FX8320 days to sit on top of a Ryzen 5 1600 last year.

      I would however stop short of saying that 120mm CLCs are stupid and pointless. They still work fine as heatsink/fan combos and mine have had a long service life.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Okay, if not stupid and pointless at least we agree on ‘louder for no advantage’ 😉

        And yes, they’re not pointless if you don’t have a compatible air cooler to hand. In a market vacuum, I’d definitely choose one over an Intel stock cooler, for example!

      • DPete27
      • 1 year ago

      I put a H50 into my Silverstone TJ08-E simply because it’s a pretty compact mATX case that working inside was difficult around a 120mm tower cooler. I did it with a tower cooler for…4 years, but the H50 for $20 deal I got was too good to pass up.

      That said, I regret going to AIO. The AIO is noisier for the same level of cooling I was getting out of a 7 year old Xigmatec 120mm tower (OG direct contact heatpipe cooler). Increasing fan speed has almost no effect on cooling/temps, but significantly increases noise. Not to mention that the GPU waste heat now gets sucked through the AIO (mounted to back fan mount in case) instead of sneaking in between the tower HSF and the rear case fan.

      I experimented with 3 or 4 different high pressure fans on the push side of the AIO (the amount of splashback is crazy at high rpm, even with a high pressure fan), and am running a vented-frame fan on the pull side.

      • Freon
      • 1 year ago

      I agree it is only ideal for small case builds. Coolers like the BeQuiet Pure Rock or Cryorig H7 seem to offer similar performance for less money using a more realiable and maintainable set of moving parts.

      A standard cooler using a standard 120 or 140mm fan could outlast the human operator.

      • Acidicheartburn
      • 1 year ago

      All I can say is I bought a 120mm H60 back in 2013 for my 4770k. I had previously been using a Noctua cooler on my Q9550 and found the performance underwhelming. The H60 is far quieter than the Noctua cooler was and keeps my 4770k under 60C at 100% load. I’ve been very happy with the cooler, and not having to worry about the tower interfering with tall RAM is a huge bonus.

      YMMV but for the $60 I paid I’m happy with my purchase.

      • hansmuff
      • 1 year ago

      I have a H150i in a huge Corsair 600Q and I’ve never had a quieter system under load. I did have to replace the fans with ML series fans though, which at this price point should not have happened. I know Corsair since changed the fans on some of the high end AIO, I didn’t have that benefit.

      In any event, overall I really love the AIO cooling for the noise or lack thereof, and I also like that I am not having 1KG of material hanging off the socket.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Yes, that is a 360mm, $170 solution (probably more like $220 with the fan replacements) that has neither the surface area limitations of a 120mm CLC, nor the compatibility with any cases small enough for the extra bulk of hoses to be an issue in.

        It’s quiet because it isn’t limited to a tiny 120x120x25mm heatsink, less that half the size of most $30 tower coolers.

      • EzioAs
      • 1 year ago

      They do have their place in mini-ITX builds where space is a real issue.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        When space is a real issue, it’s foolish to compromise the GPU airflow for the sake of the CPU.

        Unless you are running an mITX build with a very low-end GPU, the GPU should always be the cooling priority in a cramped enclosure. Many of the best compact mITX cases (Node 304, Silverstone Sugo range, to name a couple) have room for just a single fan. If it’s an exhaust fan, then restricting it with a radiator reduces the intake airflow around the GPU. If it’s an intake fan, not only does it restrict the airflow with a radiator, but it also belches hot exhaust directly at the GPU.

      • chµck
      • 1 year ago

      Try fitting anything larger in one of these: [url<]https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07BVGQCMF/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1[/url<] Regardless of space, i think it's better to aircool the CPU so the components surrounding it get cooled too.

      • ptsant
      • 1 year ago

      Three reasons for:
      – More elegant interior, easier to work around the socket.
      – Exhaust hot air outside (very important for cases that are badly ventilated)
      – Not placing a huge mechanical stress on the MB/socket (some towers can weigh 800g+).

      I am aware of the similar performance between air coolers and AiO radiators, but I have been very satisfied with my Corsair H80. Would probably buy a 2x140mm for next build.

      • f0d
      • 1 year ago

      custom water cooling isnt giving much advantages these days either with cpu’s running close to their limits leaving not much room for overclocking and massive air coolers that are extremely efficient and are much better than any watercooler for the same price

      the only reason i watercool nowdays is because its a hobby, im starting to get into hardline tubing which is fun and as a hobby it isnt all that expensive compared to the money i have dumped into my 4wd delica or hifi equipment i used to buy in the 90’s

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        I’d still run a custom loop if I went back to liquid cooling. It would almost certainly be for the purposes of cooling a GPU and if we’re going to all that effort, throwing a CPU block into the loop is the easiest part!

    • chµck
    • 1 year ago

    not RGB
    pass

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