EVGA has a sweet sixteen RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti cards

Given what transpired at Gamescom today, we figure that “2080” will be the most oft-repeated number and word for at least a good while. EVGA is on board with Nvidia's recently released Turing GPUs and is readying up a whopping 16 cards. The manufacturer's offerings are split down the middle between GeForce RTX 2080 Ti-based units and cards based on the RTX 2080.

To wit, EVGA has cards with either chip in several versions. The most basic one is an plain, unnamed option with a dual-slot, blower-style cooler.  Black and XC versions have dual-slot, dual-fan coolers. The XC Ultra variants employ a 2.75-slot dual-fan cooling apparatus. Up from there, EVGA has XC and XC2 versions with sensor-ridden iCX2 coolers bearing two fans. The top-end takes are the FTW3 and FTW3 Ultra options with three-fan iCX coolers. Those versions also have improved power delivery hardware: 14 phases for the RTX 2080 instead of the usual 10, and 19 instead of 16 for the RTX 2080 Ti.

There's currently no information on cards' clock speeds. The company tweaked its cooler designs a little, though. EVGA says its improved iCX2 design is cooler and quieter than previous versions, and that its newer hydro-dynamic-bearing fans are longer-lasting. Judging from EVGA's RTX 2080-series landing page, coolers other than the most basic one have interchangeable trims underneath the main shroud. The high-end three-fan versions also have an optional grille (that EVGA calls a shield) that can be placed atop the fans.

Despite the list of sixteen cards, there are only currently four versions in EVGA's product pages. The port loadout for all these versions includes three DisplayPorts, an HDMI output, and a USB Type-C port with VirtualLink support. The EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 XC Gaming has a dual-slot, dual-fan cooler, 8 GB of 14 GT/s memory, a three-year warranty, and goes for $750. Its XC Ultra Gaming brother has a 2.75-slot cooler, presumably higher clocks, and an $850 price tag. You'll need six-pin and eight-pin PCIe power connectors for these cards.

Over at the EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti aisle, the XC Gaming variant has 11 GB of 14 GT/s memory, a dual-fan cooler, and needs two eight-pin power connectors. This card will set you back $1150. Once again, the XC Ultra Gaming take comes with a 2.75-slot cooler and will sing your wallet a lullaby of $1250. All the cards are covered by EVGA's Step Up program that gives buyers a 90-day period in which they can upgrade their card by paying the price difference to the new model.

Comments closed
    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    Go home, EVGA, you’re drunk.

    Eight variants per card?

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    Totally happy with my launch EVGA 1080Ti right now. There’s still time to join me for <$1,000!

      • cynan
      • 1 year ago

      <$1000 Canadian no less! Currently you can easily find 1080 Tis for [url=https://www.amazon.com/EVGA-GeForce-Gaming-GDDR5X-Technology/dp/B07417FZS6/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1534863022&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=1080%2Bti&th=1&tag=techreport09-20<]$650[/url<]. By the time the RTX cards actually start shipping in a month, a 1080 Ti should be half the price of the 2080 Ti.

      • End User
      • 1 year ago

      Keep telling yourself that. You totally blew it.

      2080 Ti at launch kicked you in the balls.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        don’t project your own opinions onto others.

          • End User
          • 1 year ago

          Covfefe!

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 1 year ago

    Over at the EVGA GeForce RTX 1080 Ti aisle

    2080 Ti*

    • The Egg
    • 1 year ago

    I don’t get it. Sixteen (16) SKUs from 2 chips, and aside from small tweaks to the cooling and clocks, no meaningful difference between the lot of them.

    How is SKU spamming motherboards and videocards at all beneficial to these companies? Are they really moving more product than they otherwise would have? Seems like they’re just making things unnecessarily complicated for themselves.

      • DPete27
      • 1 year ago

      I completely agree. I’m sure there’s some sort of optimal equation for segmentation as a function of volume, but surely EVGA isn’t anywhere near the volume needed to carry 8 mostly equivalent variations of a single graphics chip from a single manufacturer.

      With EVGA GPUs, the majority of customers are going to buy what’s on sale (which generally tends to be EVGA cycling through SKUs that are building up unsold stock). Especially when it comes to Nvidia’s GPU Boost 3.0, there’s not going to be much/any performance difference among similar cooling solutions.

      Best case scenario for segmentation:
      1 variation – Short single fan card for mITX builds
      2 variations – Dual fan cards, one stock clocks, one with the 5% factory OC (assuming it doesn’t get negated by tech like GPU Boost 3.0)
      1 variation – Blower fan card
      1 variation – Uber OC, water cooled, etc etc card for niche markets.
      [u<]5 total cards[/u<]

      • OptimumSlinky
      • 1 year ago

      EVGA makes great products, but they are the WORST about this, and Gigabyte is a close second (mostly in their motherboards).

      I don’t get it either. In my mind, you’ve got:

      a) “stock” model with stock clocks. Maybe the option of a blower.
      b) “factory OC” model with beefier cooling and an overclocked base setting
      c) “elite” model with RGBs and other cringe-inducing gamer branding

      Anything beyond that just muddies the waters and confuses the consumer.

    • End User
    • 1 year ago

    The three-fan version looks awesome.

      • Stevieray
      • 1 year ago

      I would like to know when the 2080ti FTW3 edition will be available to purchase.

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 1 year ago

    Teensy bit skeptical of 19 phases

    • Firestarter
    • 1 year ago

    I can’t be the only one mostly looking at the 1080Ti prices right now

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      That’s the real depressing part, I could have bought a 1080Ti a year and a half ago and lost nothing today. But if I bought one today, I’d just regret not buying it a year and a half ago instead. So, there’s no good course of action for people waiting to upgrade except hope that the mythical $1,000 MSRP cards suddenly appear/keep waiting. Balls.

        • ColeLT1
        • 1 year ago

        1080ti for about $500 is still the best card you can get this moment and will be a good bang for buck, if it fits the budget I wouldn’t hesitate. That being said, I ordered a 2080 and am selling my 1080ti cards lol.

          • Gastec
          • 1 year ago

          That being said, you seem to be rather full of yourself. Also those who pre-order and then throw it in our faces are P.o.S.

      • nanoflower
      • 1 year ago

      Nothing to look at until those prices start to drop.

    • drfish
    • 1 year ago

    Dang, I was really hoping for a hybrid cooler option right out of the gate.

      • DancinJack
      • 1 year ago

      Are those models really that much better, or do you just like them? I always thought they seemed like a PITA.

        • drfish
        • 1 year ago

        I just like things running cooler. I don’t feel like they made much difference to clocks, except for maybe smoothing them out a bit.

    • mikepers
    • 1 year ago

    The 2080 XC GAMING is up for pre-order at Newegg at the $750 price:

    [url<]https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487404&ignorebbr=1[/url<] Others too at higher price points... edit - typo

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