Radeon Software 18.8.2 provides fire support for Strange Brigade

AMD has released the latest version of its Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition drivers. Version 18.8.2 is optimized for Strange Brigade—one of the titles Radeon buyers will currently get for free when they pick up a new RX 570, RX 580, RX Vega 56, or RX Vega 64 card (along with Assassin's Creed Odyssey and Star Control Origins). The 18.8.2 driver also includes optimizations for F1 2018.

Strange Brigade

Beyond those performance optimizations, AMD fixed a litany of bugs in this release. Enabling Frame Rate Target Control and Radeon ReLive's Instant Replay feature will no longer cause instability or stuttering. The Upgrade Advisor will consistently appear in the Radeon Settings game manager screen. Far Cry 5 will no longer exhibit dimmed or gray images with HDR10 on some systems, and it will also no longer hang if a user changes video settings on other configurations. Radeon Chill minimum and maximum frame rate settings will sync across multiple GPUs in a system now, and FreeSync will work properly with Call of Duty: Black Ops 4.

Every driver release also comes with its share of issues, and Radeon Software 18.8.2 is no exception. The company cautions that FreeSync may not kick in for Monster Hunter: World. Recording gameplay with Radeon ReLive in DirectX 12 titles might result in instability with Radeon R9 290 and Radeon R9 390 cards. If you make a practice of running multiple displays with some off and others on, you might see cursor lag or experience a laggy system. Radeon RX Vega cards might not clock down their memory at idle. Running Strange Brigade's Vulkan renderer across multiple GPUs might cause degraded performance when Enhanced Sync is enabled. Recording gameplay with ReLive while FreeSync is enabled might result in flicker on some displays. Finally, video profiles might not apply properly to video delivered through a web browser.

Interested users can update their AMD graphics drivers through Radeon Settings or download the driver directly from AMD.

Comments closed
    • Ryhadar
    • 1 year ago

    Those 18.8.2 known issues list reads like a some-side-effects-may-include disclaimer featured on prescription drug commercials.

    As a digression, I’ve really been impressed with Radeon Chill on my Vega 56. If you’re a Radeon owner and you don’t enable Radeon Chill: I think you’re probably doing yourself a disservice. *Edit* I use a 144Hz freesync monitor that smooths out chill’s rough edges

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      Chili works pretty dang well for the most part especially when you undervolt the silicon. They get nearly the same energy efficiency as Pascal/Maxwell.

      I hope AMD fixes their OpenGL drivers which appears to have abandoned legacy code for old OpenGL applications/games since 18.7.1

        • jts888
        • 1 year ago

        Honestly how far out are we really from competent user-space OpenGL shims implemented over Vulkan? I keep hearing about pretty impressive progress being made in DX over Vulkan projects, so it’s not like this is an unrealistic thing to hope for.

      • DPete27
      • 1 year ago

      Because of this comment, I gave Chill a shot, and it really is great. My monitor does 48-144Hz and I’m running Chill at 40-120Hz. 30Hz was too choppy and I can’t tell the difference >110Hz anyway.
      Temps are much lower, fans stay nice and quiet.

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    DLSS AA and Ray-tracing acceleration are overrated! Primitive shaders and asynchronous compute are where it is at!

    #PoorTuring
    #PoorVolta

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      SPEAK TRUTH TO THE NGREEDIA SHILLS BROTHA!

      • jts888
      • 1 year ago

      Primitive shading/discard would seriously fix Vega’s biggest Achilles heel, and I have still heard nothing more than speculation about whether it is truly a hardware issue or just an impossibility of AMD getting their shader compilers to use it correctly.

      I’m also still curious as to what the hell happened to inner conservative rasterization and the potential for on-GPU occlusion culling.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 1 year ago

      Depends on what you want, and it’s quite possible Vega can do hybrid rendering too. That said, Nvidia might actually support async now, but it’s hard to say whether or not it is the official thing or Nvidia’s own walled garden version of it.

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