Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 takes a dip in Amber Lake

Intel's Whiskey Lake and Amber Lake CPUs are here, and Dell is putting them to good use in its XPS 13 2-in-1. The pint-size XPS convertible is fishing two eighth-generation Intel CPU options from Amber Lake: a Core i5-8200Y with a 1.3-GHz base clock and a 3.9-GHz peak Turbo speed, plus a Core i7-8500Y option with a 1.5-GHz base clock and a 4.2-GHz peak Turbo speed. Those options supplement the Kaby Lake Core i5-7Y54 and the Core i7-7Y75.

Those new CPU options power a pair of display choices, both with touch support: one a 3200×1800 pixel array, the other a more conventional 1920×1080. Both claim 400-nit maximum brightness levels, 1000:1 maximum contrast ratios, 72% coverage of the NTSC gamut (or about 100% of sRGB), and IPS-indicative 170° side-to-side viewing angles. Buyers can also configure anywhere from 128 GB–1 TB of NVMe storage and 4 GB–16 GB of dual-channel LPDDR3-1866 RAM.

The XPS 13 2-in-1 offers one Thunderbolt 3 port that Dell says is hooked up to four lanes of PCIe 3.0. The machine also has a single “USB 3.1” Type-C port with power delivery and DisplayPort alternate-mode support. A microSD card reader rounds out this system's peripheral connections.

A 46-Wh battery powers the whole affair. Dell claims 15 hours of run time with light productivity workloads with the base Core i5 model and its 1920×1080 display. Upgrading to the Core i7 CPU, the 3200×1800 display, 16 GB of RAM, and the 1-TB SSD will cut that time down to eight hours, 35 minutes. A Windows Hello-ready web cam sits below the display for facial authentication.

XPS 13 2-in-1 systems with Amber Lake CPUs will be available starting September 11 from $999.99.

Comments closed
    • deruberhanyok
    • 1 year ago

    Anyone here actually using a convertible laptop and like it?

    Seems to be that using one as a tablet would be really awkward.

      • DavidC1
      • 1 year ago

      I have an Ivy Bridge generation XPS 12. At 3.5lbs its too heavy.

      But yes, I like the flexibility. Next one I’m looking for the one in the 2.5lbs range. I’m not a fan of the detachables as they are actually less reliable and it makes it a crappier laptop. I looked at the Yoga 11S as that line was cheap at $799 CDN and is at 2.5lbs. 1lbs difference is quite big.

      The newest Yoga that follows the lineage of the Yoga 11S is Yoga 730. The battery life sucks on that though. The 720 was better.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    If I r decide to get Intel instead of Ryzen in the near future I’ll want to get Ice Lake. It just sounds cool. I hope it runs cool too. Cool as ice, baby.

      • yeeeeman
      • 1 year ago

      Since it will be on a modified, scaled back and rushed 10nm process, probably only the name will be cool as ice. Nothing else. I think that next gen will be best AMD chance to push their APUs since they will have the 7nm advantage.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Amber Lake? First time I’ve heard of this new lake from Intel. I swear, Intel has more lake codenames than any other bridge or well in its history.

    • Pancake
    • 1 year ago

    “Dell claims 15 hours of run time with light productivity workloads”.

    Windows on ARM is dead. Buried. Cremated.

    • DavidC1
    • 1 year ago

    PCWatch is reporting while Whiskey Lake has the new CNL PCH, Amber Lake doesn’t, and for the latter even the CPU doesn’t change.

    The only thing that changes for Amber Lake is the move in TDP from 4.5W to 5W. While that’s actually quite beneficial, it may not be for most devices as previous generation Y chips often were configured at 7W. The XPS 13 2-in-1 is said to be set at even higher at 9W.

    So the advancement may be minimal.

    However, despite not having a node change, Kabylake was actually a decent step in the CPU department and battery life over Skylake. So I’ll let the results speak for themselves.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    Wait, Amber Lake and Whiskey Lake?

    Intel Marketing department is seriously wheelspinning on the line now. It’s STILL Kaby lake, and it’s STILL 14nm.

      • tipoo
      • 1 year ago

      Even one back, since Kaby Lake was a baby step over Skylake at that.

        • DavidC1
        • 1 year ago

        Skylake had a good advancement on the graphics department. But battery life was a sidegrade over Broadwell.

        But, Kabylake, without changing process or architecture, brought us nice performance and battery life improvement over Skylake.

        Educate yourself: [url<]https://www.notebookcheck.net/Kaby-Lake-Core-i7-7500U-Review-Skylake-on-Steroids.172692.0.html#toc-benchmarks[/url<] So I want to see reviews before I make conclusions.

          • Chrispy_
          • 1 year ago

          I’m sure there will be differences. According to Intel ARK and news releases, there is zero architectural change here, it’s the same GPU and CPU architecture to Kaby in every way (so was Coffee Lake, but adding 50% more cores is at least a significant change).

          Intel just have some sliders to play with; base/turbo clockspeeds, boost duration, configurable TDP, etc. They just tinker with the sliders a bit and, [i<]hey presto![/i<] it's a new CPU!

            • TheRazorsEdge
            • 1 year ago

            They can tweak functional units and increase performance or efficiency. That can happen without significant architectural changes.

            Which specific fields on ARK are making you think that nothing has changed? Because the linked article quite clearly states there is a performance bump for the new chips.

            • DavidC1
            • 1 year ago

            Whiskeylake is on 14nm++, so a change from Kabylake. Whiskeylake also includes a CNL PCH on package, and that has some nice enhancements.

            Amberlake on the other hand is disappointment. Only change is the TDP going up to 5W from 4.5W. It uses the last generation PCH.

      • TheShartReport
      • 1 year ago

      Intel’s been too busy playing damage control with the many, many architectural exploits found in its CPUs, trying to persuade investors that 10nm is coming, and telling media outlets not to benchmark its products after microcode patches have been applied lmao Lies, manipulation, deceit…just another day at Intel HQ!

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