Tuesday deals: a Micron 1100 2-TB solid-state drive for $252 and more

Howdy, gerbils! We hope y'all enjoyed Labor Day, probably with some some judicious BBQing. Around here, I joined the festivities of the Zigurfest music festival during the weekend and helped out at one of the stages, but I spent Labor Day Monday doing little of use except unclogging the dishwasher drain. Basically, I did nearly nothing, and it was everything that I thought it could be. Today, though, it's back to full-bore work, and we have some sweet deals for you.

  • We're kicking off today with a familiar face: the Micron 1100 2-TB solid-state drive. This jug o' files can push up to 530 MB/s when doing sequential reads, and up to 500 MB/s when writing. Random I/O speeds are nothing to sneeze at either, at 92K IOPS for reads and 83K IOPS when writing. Rakuten will sell you this drive for a low, low $251.59 with the checkout code SAVE15.

  • Next up, an item equally big, but of another category. The Asus ROG PG348Q is a 34″ curved display with a 3440×1440 IPS panel. This monitor is infused with G-Sync goodness, and the maximum refresh rate is 100 Hz. The included stand is height-adjustable, and you also get a USB hub and built-in speakers. Take this monitor home for $849.99 from Newegg with the cart code EMCPYPT34.

  • We'd wager a good number of you are eyeballing a Coffee Lake build, and we have just the right cornerstone for that. The EVGA Z370 FTW is a meaty affair, packed with three M.2 sockets (one of them for Wi-Fi cards), metal-reinforced DIMM slots and main PCI slots, and VRM heatsinks. Additional niceties include Intel-powered Ethernet and a Realtek ALC1220 audio codec. Get this mobo for a mere $119.99 from Amazon. That's pretty darn low, to our reckoning.

  • Nobody should ever compute without a UPS like the Cyberpower GX1325U. This unit has a capacity of 1325 VA and enough punch to push 810 W to its connected equipment. There are two handy USB ports up front, just below an ever-so-pretty LCD readout. Secure your gear and your data for just $119.99 at Newegg with the cart code EMCPYPT28.

  • Last but by no means least, a Dell G5 laptop ready for gaming on the go. The particular model on hand packs a mighty Core i7-8570H processor next to a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti graphics card with 4 GB of its own memory. Additional specs include 8 GB of system RAM, and a combo storage setup with a 128-GB SSD coupled with a 1-TB spinner. Walmart will let you have this lappie for just $799.99. That's a darn low price for this much horsepower.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • Laykun
    • 1 year ago

    I expect all 2TB SSDs to be < $250 now.

    • Wilko
    • 1 year ago

    That Micron drive has been showing up a lot with discounted prices. Typically through Rakuten sold by PlatinumMicro. I’ve been reluctant to pull the trigger since discussions I’ve seen revolving around that drive say that should anything happen the warranty is a crapshoot. Crucial or Micron may not help you with it because it’s not a consumer/retail drive, and Rakuten/PlatinumMicro tells you to go to the manufacturer.

    • G8torbyte
    • 1 year ago

    I’ve been keeping an eye on that Micron 2TB SSD drive for a while and finally pulled the trigger. Used some Rakuten points and the discount to get it below $250. Thanks for the updates.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 1 year ago

      I bought a 2TB MX500 on Prime day for $319. Maybe we’ve gone back to the days of steadily-decreasing SSD prices.

      • Saccheri
      • 1 year ago

      Around $600 in the UK for this drive!
      20% of that will be a sales tax (VAT) which I’m assuming isn’t in these US prices?

      [url<]https://www.scan.co.uk/products/2tb-micron-1100-25-ssd-sata-iii-6gb-s-tlc-3d-nand-read-530mb-s-write-500mb-s-92k-83k-iops-retail[/url<]

        • MOSFET
        • 1 year ago

        It’s not in the prices but we still get to pay sales and use tax, commonly around 10% when state and local taxes are combined.

      • morphine
      • 1 year ago

      You’re welcome! Thanks for shopping!

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    That Asus ultrawide looks great, but the price is hard to swallow, even with a $150 discount.

    It’s not HDR,
    IPS with its corner-glow is a poor match for ultrawide format.
    IPS with its low contrast and backlight bleed is a poor match for gaming.
    IPS with it’s inflexible, uniformity-sensitive panel is a poor match for a curved monitor.

    [s<]Over 40% of the 343 reviews on amazon mention issues with backlight bleed and/or uniformity issues and many of those reviewers are vocal about how poor Asus' RMA process is on this model. As if that wasn't bad enough, there are lots of complaints about stuck/dead pixels. There are lots of photos of the monitor and it appears that they all suffer from backlight bleed so severe that I would consider the whole product line faulty by design. Some reviews (with photo evidence) compare three successive RMAs for backlight bleed and I can only assume that monitors like this are why you don't really see curved IPS panels on the market any more - A total failure, with an astronomical pricetag to rub salt in the wounds.[/s<] [i<]Ignore me, Amazon lumps other models in with the listing and most of the horrendous photos and negative reviews are for one of two other Asus monitors. The PG348Q seems decent, by IPS standards - especially curved IPS standards. You'll still get more backlight bleed than other panel types and you'll still get corner glow and poor contrast, but I'm pretty sure anyone shopping for an IPS monitor is well aware of the differences between panel types so there's no need to single out the PG348Q over any other IPS monitor.[/i<]

      • Goty
      • 1 year ago

      You could just get the comparable Freesync monitor from ASUS, which uses a VA panel and is less expensive even before it goes on discount, and use the Freesync-on-NVIDIA workaround that was reported over the weekend (at least until NVIDIA kills it anyhow, because they don’t want their customers to have nice things.)

      • MOSFET
      • 1 year ago

      I would’ve thought you were ranting on TN if you hadn’t repeatedly specified IPS.

      • tay
      • 1 year ago

      I am convinced that some of the IPS corner-glow is caused by the backlight reflecting off the AG-coating. AG-coating is absolute garbage and it *almost* makes me want to buy an iMac. The corner-glow is always worse the more AG coating the monitor has.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Corner glow is usually reduced on IPS by using multiple polarizing filters, but’s an inherant side effect of the technology. The liquid-crystals are pre-tilted and you get a reddish brightness at 45° & 315°, whilst the perpendicular angles at 135° & 225° will exhibit a cooler, blue glow.

        No matter what angle they manufacture the panel with, IPS requires pre-tilt so you’ll always get an excess of light when your line of sight is aligned with or perpendicular to the LC tilt.

        Excess anti-glare treatment just amplifies the effect, ensuring that some of the scattered light matches the pre-tilt of the liquid crystals no matter where you look on the panel. In saying that, I’ve had gloss/glass IPS with bad corner glow too. It’s just the way the tech works.

          • tay
          • 1 year ago

          Cool thanks for the reply.

          • Spunjji
          • 1 year ago

          Seconding this. 27″ iMacs and my old HP Z1 (all of these have glossy glass-covered screens) exhibit corner glow to some greater or lesser extent.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      Response times are king. I’ve used UWS IPS and UWS MVA. You rarely notice backlight bleed, but lord help you if you’re in a scene or level whose color scheme leads to a lot of jarring 50ms MVA transitions.

      Everything is compromise until OLED. I’ve tried TN, MVA, and IPS, with IPS being the best compromise.

        • Goty
        • 1 year ago

        I love OLED screens too, but I really think the technology’s shortcomings make it a poor choice for PC screens. I’m hoping for micro LEDs to come along quickly now.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        A bad VA is definitely worse than a bad IPS, but a good VA is definitely better than a good IPS.

        At worst, VA transitions can be in excess of 50ms for a smeary mess with darker scenes in motion.
        At best, VA transitions match the fastests IPS transitions, but with vastly superior contrast and zero corner glow.

        Sadly it’s not as simple as recommending one tech over the other, each has benefits in specific applications and each comes in a wide range of qualities.

    • Waco
    • 1 year ago

    Excellent Office Space reference. 🙂

      • morphine
      • 1 year ago

      Sure thing, Bob.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 1 year ago

    Speaking of UPS(es), has anyone found a not so hackish way of getting more powerful output from multiple units without the need to buy a full rack-mount UPS? I have a 1500VA unit and it just flat out could’t handle over 800W constant output. I guess if SLI/Crossfire ever make their way back into prime time I might just go with dual PSU each with their own UPS. Oh and have you seen Threadripper OC pulling over 700W from the CPU alone!

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      I bought a higher quality 1500VA cyberpower rated to 1050w but it cost $350. You get what you pay for. There are much better options than even what I got

      • Waco
      • 1 year ago

      The solution is to buy a bigger/better UPS. That said, why do you have a gaming rig on a UPS?

        • JosiahBradley
        • 1 year ago

        To help protect the hardware from brownouts and power flickers. Power systems are very important to the health of the components. I always use Seasonic PSUs and like to back them with beefy UPS(es). The problem is after 1500VA you tend to need to go rackmount.

          • Waco
          • 1 year ago

          [url<]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ANU8M5W[/url<] There are options there to go larger as well. All of them do require bigger circuits though (L5-30s). The biggest with a standard plug seems to be 1500VA/1050W. If you have a 20A outlet there are several options in the 2200VA/2000W range. I understand the rational behind a UPS on a computer, but even given that, I can't justify it on my desktop. Modern PSUs are pretty damn good at filtering power and handling brownouts.

        • MOSFET
        • 1 year ago

        Every PC should be on a UPS! I even put TVs and Shields on UPS. Stereos, turntables, amps.

        And more on topic, every time I’ve bought the Cyberpower 1325/810, later on I wish I would have waited for the 1500/910 (or whatever). Between work and home, and between the 1325s and the 1500s, I have I think 8 or so going now. I used to buy all APC, but the ridiculous Trade-UPS program is more like Throw-UPS. Still, with a battery replacement at about 5 years, most APCs have lasted 10 years or longer. I haven’t owned a Cyberpower for more than 4 or 5 years so we’ll see.

        • trek205
        • 1 year ago

        What kind of stupid question is that? My gosh I think that would be 100% self-explanatory why someone would use a UPS with a gaming rig.

          • Waco
          • 1 year ago

          Really? I can’t see a good reason on a gaming rig. There’s nothing there that matters much and the additional cost can be quite significant.

            • MOSFET
            • 1 year ago

            ~$100 to protect an important $1000+ investment is [i<]my[/i<] reasoning, and I can certainly see where some people can't justify it. When it comes to the living room, I moved an older Back-UPS in the 750VA/450W range there, and plug in everything with the help of a power strip (TV, Shield, NUC, SteamLink, stereo, turntable, Schiit DAC, cable box, Yamaha sound base (for TV only), guitar amp, i think that's all). It's troubling to troubleshoot when wondering whether all those wall warts have taken their last surge. Upstairs, my cable modem has been having issues, and I have this sneaking suspicion that it may just be the AC/DC.

            • Waco
            • 1 year ago

            UPSes for gaming rigs aren’t $100, though, and a good surge protector gets you everything they offer except for power loss protection at a fraction of the cost.

            What am I missing here? $400+ for every high-wattage computer or $50 for a really good surge protector. If you’re really suspecting your power input is malformed, a line conditioner is still far less expensive than a battery-backed UPS of comparable wattage.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 1 year ago

            This 900-watt UPS handles my gaming PC:
            [url<]https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1500PFCLCD-Sinewave-Outlets-Mini-Tower/dp/B00429N19W/[/url<]

            • MOSFET
            • 1 year ago

            I have several of that exact model, but they were not purchased at anything near $200.

            Basically, I want power loss protection and it’s affordable, so why not? I skip the big TV, I skipped the DVD and BluRay era, I’m not much of a movie fan, I skip HD cable, I have one vehicle and no motorized toys, so allow me to have a few minutes of fun while the power is out!

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