Canon shatters the mirror with EOS R full-frame camera

It's full-frame mirrorless camera season, and Canon is going hunting with its new EOS R body and RF lenses. Like Sony, Nikon, Fuji, Panasonic, and Olympus cameras before it, Canon has dropped the flipping mirror from the EOS R to allow its lens designers greater freedom to produce smaller, higher-performance lenses and allow for better communication between body and glass. 

The system starts with the EOS R body and its new RF mount. This is a 30.3-MP shooter with an 8-FPS continuous shooting speed. Its sensitivity ranges from ISO 100 to ISO 40,000, and Canon includes pushed modes to ISO 102,400. The body integrates Canon's pioneering Dual Pixel AF technology with a claimed 5,655 manually-selectable focus points. The system can function even with lenses whose diaphragms open no wider than (or are restricted to) f/11.

For videographers, the EOS R will deliver 4K video at up to 30 FPS, and it can output 10-bit 4:2:2 footage to an external recorder. The EOS R will support a Canon Log color profile to allow colorists plenty of latitude when grading footage.

Canon also has four RF lenses ready to go for the EOS R. The RF 28-70 mm L offers an f/2 maximum aperture that's rare in normal zooms for full-frame cameras. The RF 50 mm f/1.2 L continues Canon's tradition of ultra-fast normal lenses. The RF 24-105 mm f/4 L offers a moderately fast constant aperture and a wide focal length range. Finally, a 35-mm f/1.8 Macro serves as a fast mild wide-angle that can get up close in a pinch.

All RF lenses have a separate control ring on their barrels that can be used to adjust shutter speed, aperture, exposure compensation, and possibly more. RF lenses will show information like subject distance and focal length in the finder so that the photographer doesn't need to lower the camera to confirm key details of their setup. 

Like Nikon, Canon will allow users of its existing camera systems to adapt their EF and EF-S lenses to the EOS R body. The company is making three such adapters: one that simply mechanically couples EF lenses to the EOS R, one that adds the RF control ring to EF lenses, and a third that allows the use of drop-in filters with specialized lenses like the EF 11-24 mm f/4 L.

The EOS R body itself will arrive next month for $2299, body-only. Canon will also bundle the EOS R with the 24-105 mm f/4 L lens for $3399.

As for lenses, the RF 50 mm f/1.2 L will be available in October for $2299. The RF 28-70 mm f/2 L lens will list for $2999, the RF 24-105 mm f/4 L will carry a $1099 sticker, and the RF 35 mm f/1.8 Macro will sticker at $499.99. Those three lenses will be available in December.

The basic EF-EOS R adapter will list for $99.99, while the EF-EOS R control ring adapter will command $199.99. Both adapters will be available next month. The EF-EOS R drop-in filter mount adapter will list for $399.99 with a variable ND filter or $299.99 with a circular polarizer inside. Either way, that adapter will be available in February of next year.

Comments closed
    • davidbowser
    • 1 year ago

    I started reading this and I felt a great disturbance, as if several thousand dollars just disappeared from my bank account.

    • ludi
    • 1 year ago

    Question.

    I downsized from a Canon 7D and pretty fantastic lens collection a few years ago to an Olympus E-M10 and while it was the right move size and $-wise at the time, I have never figured out how to manually focus the lens for timed night exposures in really dark settings. With an SLR it’s quite easy with a wide lens and a night-adjusted eye.

    Is there a way around this, or are these new generations of mirrorless just banking on the fact that not so many people are into night photography?

      • Lianna
      • 1 year ago

      It’s even better (more precise) with Focus Assist (or whatever your Always-Live View magnification is called). Choose one star, not the brightest, just one bright enough to be visible under magnification. I use it with both regular lenses and telescopes (Sony NEX user here).

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      Can you turn up the gain on the EVF/rear screen + (focus assist) zoom when manually adjusting focus? I can do that on my GX-7.

      Also, if you’re serious about night photography, you might want to get a manual focus wide angle prime from the likes of Samyang, Voigtlander, SLR Magic etc.

      EDIT: The weaknesses of focus-by-wire systems are not limited to Mirrorless cameras. Many, if not most, of Canon’s STM lenses do not have a distance scale (electronic or otherwise) when manually adjusting focus.

        • ludi
        • 1 year ago

        Okay, looks like I need to do some feature hunting. It’s been a while since I’ve gone all the way through my settings on that camera.

          • TheEmrys
          • 1 year ago

          Yeah. With Focus Peaking and Focus Magnify, I don’t really miss anything when I am manually focusing. I know Olympus has something similar to focus magnify. I don’t know about focus peaking.

    • oldog
    • 1 year ago

    FWIW RIP dSLRs.

      • DancinJack
      • 1 year ago

      Not yet, but yeah, within a decade.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 1 year ago

      Kinda makes me want to buy used DSLR stuff cheap.

    • danny e.
    • 1 year ago

    But what is the EVF like? I think I’ll be sticking to dslr for a while since I’ve yet to see any evf that doesn’t suck

      • TheEmrys
      • 1 year ago

      When was the last time you tried one? From the a7rII they are all quite good.

        • danny e.
        • 1 year ago

        I have never tried one on anything other than the high-end p/s cameras.

        Pick up.. pan. Yup, still sucks.

        So, do the ones on the A7RII + handle panning when shooting birds in flight?

        [url<]https://500px.com/photo/246526899/whooping-crane-horicon-marsh-by-lightinfractions[/url<]

    • DancinJack
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<] RF 28-70 mm f/2 L[/quote<] DO WANT!

    • DancinJack
    • 1 year ago

    After seeing Canon and Nikon’s first attempts, I’m still on the Sony train until they make something that’s really, substantially better. These first attempts aren’t…great.

      • moriz
      • 1 year ago

      both of these products would’ve been great back in 2016 or so. looks like both Nikon and Canon were developing cameras that could beat the Sony A7r2… however, the A7r3 now exists.

      looks like being first to market does have its advantages.

        • DancinJack
        • 1 year ago

        Yup, that’s about how I see it. Both are overpriced for what they offer in 2018.

        But yeah, “first to market” in this case also means they’ve had three or four iterations to get things relatively right, and they’ve done that. Sony’s UI is still very meh IMO, but the A7RIII is a baller camera.

    • jarder
    • 1 year ago

    Looks like they may have orphaned their EOS M line.

    Recap, the EOS M line are Canons mirrorless APS-C cameras and they use a completely different mount to the new fullframe EOS R line. Furthermore they didn’t even announce any adapters where you might be able to use a fullframe lens on an APS-C camera, or visa versa (cropped). This seems like a complete mess to me as having competing formats will reduce the likelihood of having a decent range of lenses in the long run. And why would anyone buy an EOS M camera or lens now, it’s basically a dead-end system.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 1 year ago

      Good point. I never really understood that line, to be honest.

      • moriz
      • 1 year ago

      EOS M line is a dead-end system, just like pretty much every other interchangeable lens system out there. the only exception might be Canon’s EF mount lenses, because there are so many of them, and there are numerous adapters that allow you to use those lenses on other camera bodies.

      otherwise, the EOS M line is targeting the semi-casual/enthusiast traveler crowd. those people want small cameras but also want the option of changing lenses.

      yes, other choices exist. fujifilm’s APSC line is arguably superior to anything in the EOS M line, and Olympus and Panasonic all have good micro-4/3 ILC systems. however, none of them say “Canon” on them.

      lastly, EOS R is not a replacement for EOS M, nor are they directly competing against each other. while EOS R is smaller than most of canon’s pro DSLRs, it is still positively massive compared to the EOS M cameras.

        • thx1138r
        • 1 year ago

        You didn’t mention Sony, they have by far the biggest range of mirrorless lenses at the moment and easily the best support from 3rd party lens makers, perhaps some to do with them making their mirrorless lens mount specifications freely available unlike Canon and Nikon.

        I’ve been looking at getting back into the interchangeable lens camera game for a few months now so I’ve been looking at all the new mirrorless cameras in detail. I sold my 10-year old DSLR and collection of lenses some 6 months because the writing was on the wall that mirrorless is the way to go and I didn’t want to invest any more in an obsolete system.

        Right now, Sony is looking like the best option for a new system, mainly because they planned ahead with their E-Mount so that it be used on both Full Frame and APS-C sensor sizes. The only drawbacks are the natural optical ones, using a dedicated APS-C lens on a full-frame camera results in a cropped image, i.e. it’ll only about half of the full-frame sensors full area. Using a full-frame lens on an APS-C camera has no drawbacks apart from the expected 1.5x magnification factor.

        So my plan is to start buying into the new system with a cheap/small Sony APS-C camera and kit lens, then adding a few full-frame lenses, later on getting a full-frame body, but probably keeping the APS-C body around for traveling.

        I don’t see any camera maker giving me this kind of flexibility. From what I understand Fuji’s X mount is too small to take full frame lenses. I do like the micro 4/3 cameras, but I would resigning myself to having 2 systems, not something I’d do lightly.

        If anyone has any other ideas I’d be glad to hear them.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 1 year ago

          Adapting other lens mounts to mirrorless cameras is pretty easy because the sensor is so much closer to the mounting flange that once you’ve added a spacer to equal the flange to sensor distance required for the DSLR lenses, you’ve got space for the physical or electronic adaptation needed, too.

          • moriz
          • 1 year ago

          you can adapt DSLR lenses to mirrorless bodies due to the longer flange distance on DSLR lenses.

          as such, while it’s true that Sony has the best mirrorless lens lineup, you cannot adapt them to anything, because there’s very little flange distance in which you can stick an adapter.

          Canon, on the other hand, has the flange distance to be adapted to all available mirrorless bodies, and has the lens selection to make it worthwhile.

          i currently use a Fujifilm X-T1, but i only have one Fuji lens: the 16-55mm f/2.8. all my other lenses are Canon EF mount (Sigma 24mm and 35mm f/1.4, Canon 85mm f/1.8, Canon 70-200mm f/4), with the Fringer EF-FX Pro adapter.

          this means that i am effectively not locked into any ILC system: if i want to switch to any other system, all i need to do is trade in the X-T1 and the 16-55mm, and get any camera body with its 24-70ish equivalent, and an adapter to get my EF mount lenses working again, and i’m ready to go.

            • thx1138r
            • 1 year ago

            I take your point abaout adapters, they do have some drawbacks, but as long as you stay from the APS-C, EF-S lenses then your full frame EF lenses whould be adaptable to the new mirrorless full-frame cameras. I had a DSLR for years though, and I know I can resist the urge to become a lens nerd. So I’ll probably be able to get away with maybe 4 mirrorless full-frame lenses and at the moment Sony already have enough lenses for me to be able to live without adapters. And buying into a lens system now when it’s clear it’s slowly going to become obsolete just doesn’t seem like a great investment.

          • Zizy
          • 1 year ago

          I highly doubt you will make anything less than a full switch. You likely find the idea attractive, but ultimately you aren’t going to spend obscene amount of money on top FF glass for “only” the alpha 6300, and you are not going to stick “mere” APS-C glass on the FF body – otherwise why even buy it? As for traveling, assuming you do end up upgrading to the FF, your old body will be used only with the old glass, not the new FF ones, because these FF suckers are heavy and expensive – you aren’t going to lug them around on hikes.

          In the end, ASP-C + FF combo will perform like ASP-C + ASP-C for more money and weight. So, don’t bother. If you want a “studio” camera and a “travel” camera, I strongly advise you to pick TWO systems, even if you dislike the idea now. They might be Sony + Sony of course, just don’t choose because of compatibility.

          Sony seems nice for most stuff in both ranges, though I would pick m4/3 for tele gear.

            • thx1138r
            • 1 year ago

            Some good points there, particularly about the likelihood of using full frame lenses on an APS-C camera. The lenses are indeed bigger and heavier, so, yes they would be much less portable than the APS-C equivalents. My main point though was that I could get the APS-C camera now, have just a single APS-C lens for travel, then add a full frame lens or two for “studio” stuff, and add the full frame camera later on when prices drop, the lenses would then still be good when I move up to the full-frame mirrorless.

            You’ve also got some good points about the “two systems” approach, I do have two separate needs, something small and light for traveling and something better for when I can bring more gear. I really can’t see myself investing in two separate interchangeable lens systems though, so I have also been looking into the “1 inch” sensor point-and-shoots, and Nikon, Panasonic and Sony all have some very pocket-able cameras that seem to deliver very good results for their size. So that option is a very close second best for me at the moment, with the obvious advantage that I can defer the choice of my full-frame mirrorless system until the market becomes more clear.

            I do like the m4/3 system, small light and good quality, but the problem for me is that my uncle, who does some wedding photography let me borrow his full frame Canon 5d III and even a novice like me could get noticeably better shots than with my APS-C, so I really do want to go full-frame in the long run, it’s just a matter of getting there with the least pain.

            I find it much easier to pick computer gear than I do cameras.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 1 year ago

            My best advice for dealing with the weight of your camera and monster telephoto lens is to get an over-the-shoulder strap from [url=http://www.blackrapid.com/all/camerastraps<]Black Rapid[/url<] to replace your camera’s neck strap. It literally gets rid of a pain in the neck.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        On a related note, the [url=https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-m-32mm-f-14-stm-lens<]EF-M 32mm f/1.4 STM[/url<] was just announced as the eighth native lens for the EF-M mount. Native EF-M lenses are [i<]tiny[/i<] compared to EF lenses with similar focal length and aperture. I do agree that Canon's line-up is transitioning through a weird place. · Full frame EOS DSLRs have a very large selection of EF (full frame) lenses. · APS-C EOS DSLRs have a large selection of EF-S (APS-C) lenses and are fully functional with all EF (full frame) lenses. · APS-C mirrorless EOS M cameras have a limited selection of native EF-M lenses. With a very inexpensive passive adapter tube, these cameras are fully-functional with all EF (full frame) and all EF-S (APS-C) lenses. · Full frame mirrorless EOS R cameras initially have a very limited selection of native RF lenses. With an adapter, these cameras are fully-functional with all EF (full frame) lenses. The one "universal" is that the whole range of full frame EF lenses works with any of the EOS cameras. If I were trying to simplify things right now, I believe that I would target quick elimination of all of the APS-C DSLRs and EF-S lenses while retaining the full-frame EF lenses for several years until the RF line is fully established. One could bundle a very inexpensive [url=https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/995005-REG/fotodiox_eos_auto_eos_m_p_canon_eos_m_camera_mount.html<]adapter[/url<] with the best EOS-M camera with a viewfinder (currently the EOS M5) to link it to the whole collection of EF and EF-S lenses and to take the rung in the market currently occupied by APS-C DSLRs. Understanding that entry-level interchangeable lens cameras are a gateway to developing a life-long customer base for more expensive lenses and cameras, I would expect Canon to develop a new APS-C mirrorless interchangeable lens camera that can work with tiny lenses like the EF-M system does and work with the new RF lenses (and EF to RF adapters) too. If this requires a new mount rather than extending the EF-M system, then yes, EF-M could become a dead end.

    • ptsant
    • 1 year ago

    The mirrorless price wars have begun.

    I’ll buy the midrange version when it comes out. $1000-1200 is about OK for me.

      • moriz
      • 1 year ago

      Fujifilm is going to announce the X-T3 in about 9 hours from now. rumor has it that it’ll be priced around $1599 or so.

    • Voldenuit
    • 1 year ago

    *cough*

    [quote<]For videographers, the EOS R will deliver 4K video at [s<]up to 30 FPS[/s<] [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2hbF4F48ok<]a 1.7x crop[/url<][/quote<]

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      Also, the Fuji X-T3 is going to have 4k60fps capture, and presumably they’ll carry over the F-log and 10-bit video capture from the X-T2.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 1 year ago

        The lack of 4k60p is pretty bad. It would have made a pretty good videographers camera. Maybe if they would trade 5k/30p, but 4k/30p is 2 years late.

        • moriz
        • 1 year ago

        F-log, 10-bit 4:2:0 to internal SD card. 4:2:2 to external monitor.

        I wonder if the X-T3 will still have the 4K crop. If not, then that thing’s gonna be pretty monstrous.

          • Voldenuit
          • 1 year ago

          I am seriously considering the new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera with native (Sony) 4096×2160 sensor. Stills sensors have outpaced my photo needs/wants, but video is always lacking, for me.

            • moriz
            • 1 year ago

            good news: the X-T3 can do up to cinema 4K at 30fps without any crop. and unlike previous Fujifilm cameras, it does not require the battery grip to gain access to all of its features, and its record limit is 30 minutes, instead of the 10 minutes on older bodies.

            other than a lack of IBIS, the X-T3 is looking pretty good as a hybrid system.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      That guy should run. It looks like his house is full of smoke. Stop talking to the camera and save yourself!

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    Using the word “shatters” with parts this expensive is a little scary!

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      # sed /s/shatters/shutters ?

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        How about “captures”, images, illuminates or “focuses on”?

      • kvndoom
      • 1 year ago

      I am shattering the mirror.
      Pray I don’t shatter it any further.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CZhpjOzP9o&t=01m58s<]This deal is very fair and I'm happy to be a part of it.[/url<]

    • Peldor
    • 1 year ago

    Nice price on the body. Holy sticker shock on the 50mm lens.

    I shouldn’t be surprised, but it still always gets me on their L lenses.

      • Captain Ned
      • 1 year ago

      Hefty suckers, too. The 50mm f/1.2 comes in at 950g while the 28-70mm f/2 weighs 1430g. Body weight with batteries is 660g.

      [url<]https://www.dpreview.com/news/0967290858/canon-full-frame-mirrorless-system-launches-with-four-rf-mount-lenses[/url<]

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    The last couple weeks I’ve felt a growing urge to replace my Nikon dSLR with a nice (not this nice, but still nice) mirrorless setup. All that’s stopping me is the lack of desire to spend the money on it. 😆

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 1 year ago

      Quite the opposite here. I remain very pleased with my EOS 5D Mk. III DSLR. It is a pleasure to use and is more than capable of meeting my photographic needs. Sure, I’ll be looking for a mirror-less body when I replace it, but that day is still several years in the future. I’ll settle for auto-focus at f/8 until then.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        I didn’t say my D3300 wasn’t meeting my needs, but lately I’ve had an “ooh shiny” feeling. 😆

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          I had that same problem. I was becoming a tech enthusiast over photography enthusiast.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            It’s hard to get out of the Gear Acquisition Syndrome mode, for sure.

            I bet you have a lot of experience with GAS, given how you blow out your pants. lololololol

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 1 year ago

            LMAO +1

        • ptsant
        • 1 year ago

        I also used to be very happy with my aging EOS Rebel (550 in Europe). But when I bought the EOS 80, I was shocked by the difference in dynamic range. I can recover photos that are quite severely over/underexposed and this really. That and a new fast (cheap) prime lens really changed my photo experience.

        I’m not the guy to upgrade every year (or 2 years), but sometimes there is genuine progress. More than I could imagine just by looking at spec sheets. Honestly, I’m excited by the perspective of a mirrorless Canon in 2-3 years.

          • DancinJack
          • 1 year ago

          The EOS T2i and 80D are so much further apart than what JAE has and this. He wouldn’t see a ton of upgrade in getting this over his 5D.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 1 year ago

    L Lenses are beautiful!

      • ptsant
      • 1 year ago

      Both L lenses are epic. The 28-70/f2 is really impressive. These can make or break the product.

        • jihadjoe
        • 1 year ago

        On first glance it seems to be about the same size as the EF-mount 28-70 f/2.8.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 1 year ago

      I got a hit on my price alert from CanonPriceWatch today with the [url=https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/products/details/lenses/ef/standard-medium-telephoto/ef-85mm-f-1-4l-is-usm<]EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM[/url<] at $1399 new from an authorized dealer. Must... resist... gear acquisition.

    • Captain Ned
    • 1 year ago

    camera-report.com is still available, dagnabbit.

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