AMD debuts Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X for prebuilt PCs

AMD announced two new second-generation Ryzen CPUs this morning. The Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X bring Precision Boost 2 and XFR 2 to quad-core Ryzens without integrated graphics, but there's a catch: these chips appear to be available exclusively to system integrators and OEMs for use in prebuilt systems. AMD is debuting the Ryzen 5 2500X in cooperation with Acer in the form of the Nitro 50 desktop PC.

  Cores/

threads

Base

clock

(GHz)

Boost

clock

(GHz)

Total

cache

TDP Suggested

price

Ryzen 7 2700X 8/16 3.7 4.3 20 MB 105 W $329
Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 4.1 65 W $299
Ryzen 5 2600X 6/12 3.6 4.2 19 MB 95 W $229
Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 3.9 65 W $199
Ryzen 5 2500X 4/8 3.6 4.0 10 MB N/A
Ryzen 3 2300X 4/4 3.5 4.0

AMD says the Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X each use a single enabled core complex (or CCX) from the two available on Pinnacle Ridge Zeppelin dies to get their four cores. Recall that the Ryzen 5 1500X instead used two cores from each CCX to get its core count. A consequence of this architectural change versus the Ryzen 5 1500X is that the Ryzen 5 2500X now has 8 MB of L3 cache, down from 16 MB. That puts both the Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X on par with the Ryzen 3 1300X and Ryzen 3 1200 on a cache-capacity basis.

The Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X are, in theory, fully unlocked and support AMD's Precision Boost Overdrive feature for all-core overclocking within AMD's Ryzen Master utility. First-generation Ryzen CPUs and motherboards don't support Precision Boost Overdrive.

While a pair of CPUs exclusive to system integrators and OEMs might seem odd, that fact makes sense given how the rest of AMD's 2018 product stack looks. The company already has “first-generation-plus” Ryzen quad-core APUs in the form of the Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G, and AMD's own efforts to democratize higher-core-count chips has rendered quad-core parts without integrated graphics a distinctly niche market.

OEMs that want to build gaming PCs with discrete graphics cards inside probably want all 16 lanes of PCIe that Ryzen CPUs offer, but they can likely do without the Vega IGP on those parts. In that way, then, the Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X fill an important niche for AMD's partners, but it's not terribly shocking that DIY builders aren't being granted access to these parts as processors-in-boxes.

Comments closed
    • willmore
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]OEMs that want to build gaming PCs with discrete graphics cards inside probably want all 16 lanes of PCIe that Ryzen CPUs offer, but they can likely do without the Vega IGP on those parts.[/quote<] I'm not sure what this part was talking about. Are the IGP equiped Ryzen parts limited in their PCI-E lanes or was this a comparison to Intel chips?

      • jts888
      • 1 year ago

      Neither, I think.

      Just that some gaming PC OEMs will want only a fully connected x16 PCIe 3.0 port, and no IGP on the CPU, if that means a cheaper component. And whether AMD used salvaged APUs with defective IGPs or could made smaller IGP-less processors, they would stand to win sales either way.

      • Beahmont
      • 1 year ago

      The last I saw of the official specs, Ryzen APU’s used some of the chips PCI-E lanes to run the interconnect to the iGPU leaving only 8 lanes for the motherboard.

      So yes, the talk about 16 lanes is an important part of the difference between these OEM chips and the 2200G and the 2400G as well as these new parts having more L3 Cache.

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Basically yesterday’s Core i7 and Core i5. Boring today but more than enough for Walmart shoppers like Grandma.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    I’d rather get Raven Ridge, or wait for Picasso.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 1 year ago

      I swear most people on this site don’t like to read anything contrary or critical. It seems the only way not to get down voted into Oblivion is to sing praises of anything that gets talked about.

    • Bauxite
    • 1 year ago

    Not totally wrong to aim these at lower end gaming boxes with discrete gpus.

    These 1 CCX chips even with less total cache should be better than their similar 1XXX counterparts at gaming, not just due to the clockspeed improvements but better latency not having to cross to another CCX.

    Many games already benefit from pinning to a single CCX, or the same die on TR. Especially if they normally have no reason going past 8 (hint: console ports) or 16 threads, which is actually very often the case even today.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 1 year ago

      Don’t modern CPU schedulers keep things on the same CCX?

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        With a pair of dual core CCXes like the first gen products, that gets difficult.

        • willmore
        • 1 year ago

        They do, but most gaming is done on Windows.

      • OptimumSlinky
      • 1 year ago

      Exactly. I paired a Ryzen 5 1500X with an RX570, and overclocked to a conservative 3.9 GHz, the CPU is nowhere near my limiting factor in gaming.

      For a sub-$900 gaming system with a discrete GPU, these CPUs are scrappy.

        • willmore
        • 1 year ago

        Is that with games that implement threading or classic single threaded games? I have a 4.3GHz overclocked i5-3570K with an RX580 and I’m often slowed down on single threaded games. But only in pretty extreme situations like end game ‘board full of pieces’ type of situations. The GPU never seems to be a limit.

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    The lack of intergrated GPU is going to hurt these SKUs in the eyes of OEMs.

    #PoorCorei3
    #PoorPentium

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      The target for these things is going to be a cheap gaming PC like you get for $600-700 from iBuyPower or Acer. I’m sure that AMD isn’t thrilled about selling a Ryzen die with half (or more) of the features disabled anyway.

      edit: in fact, I’d go so far as to guess that the builders, who had previously offered low-end AMD builds with FX chips, have been asking for just this sort of nonsense.

      And if you want an iGPU, the Ryzen 5 2400G is still out there.

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        Not nonsense. More like binning. Waste not want not.

      • MOSFET
      • 1 year ago

      You’re replying to an article where Jeff explains that these are iGPU-less [i<]because[/i<] of OEMs.

        • ronch
        • 1 year ago

        These are not stripped of graphics because of OEMs. They’re for OEMs because they’re probably the leftovers from the wafer after AMD harvested all the fancier dies and AMD can afford to price them cheap. And of course AMD sells APUs to OEMs as well.

          • Zizy
          • 1 year ago

          AMD is probably disabling chips on purpose. These parts require one CCX intact and the other with 2+ dead cores, otherwise these parts would be the R5 2600 at least. I don’t think there are too many such cores to be a decent high volume OEM chip.

      • chuckula
      • 1 year ago

      The lack of integrated GPU in yet another AMD product that we are all supposed to call amazing and innovative just means that integrated graphics is clearly dying!

      As AMD has ALWAYS said: The Future is Fission.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 1 year ago

        And of course that need to eliminate the iGPU was why they also had to pay an arm, leg, kidney, and first born child for ATI.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]OEMs that want to build gaming PCs with discrete graphics cards inside probably want all 16 lanes of PCIe that Ryzen CPUs offer, but they can likely do without the Vega IGP on those parts. In that way, then, the Ryzen 5 2500X and Ryzen 3 2300X fill an important niche for AMD's partners...[/quote<]

    • davidbowser
    • 1 year ago

    I don’t have an issue with either Intel or AMD segmenting per se, but this looks like “market segmentation” rather than binning. If the outcome of this is increased competition in the prebuilt PC market, then I am DEFINITELY all for it.

    On that note, my Ryzen 2600 is chugging along and I have yet to hit something that makes it so much as sputter. The only thing I have on that PC that actually hits all cores is MakeMKV and HandBrake.

      • SoundFX09
      • 1 year ago

      In addition, these CPUs will go along nicely with systems rocking GTX 1050 Ti’s and 1060’s, as well as RX 570’s and 580’s. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a plethora of OEM Systems containing these CPU and GPU Combinations at reasonable prices.

      Both the Consumers and AMD win with these chips.

      However, it’s too soon to say it will bury the Pentiums and i3’s. I expect some fairly good competition around the $50-125 CPU Market.

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