Nvidia welcomes nine more games to the DLSS party

Ahead of the September 20 launch of Nvidia's GeForce RTX graphics cards with Turing GPUs inside, more and more game developers are signing up to take advantage of those cards' unique capabilities. Today, the company reports that nine more games have joined the Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) fold. DLSS promises crisp image quality from Turing graphics cards with lower performance impacts than multisampled antialiasing or other similar techniques. Here's the list of the latest round of games that will support DLSS, courtesy of Nvidia:

 That list joins 16 titles that have already promised DLSS support on Turing cards:

While some of Nvidia's RTX hybrid-rendering features are incorporated in games that are still a long ways off, it appears gamers upgrading to GeForce RTX cards will have plenty of DLSS-ready titles to try when they fire up the cards' tensor cores soon, if nothing else.

Source: Nvidia

Separately, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang reiterated that the GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti are ready to power 4K gaming experiences at 60 FPS or better in his GTC Japan keynote, both with and without DLSS enabled.

Source: Nvidia GTC Japan keynote video

While the company' s supporting slides on this point are as vague as ever, it reiterates the fact that Nvidia expects these cards to be used primarily to power the glut of inexpensive 4K displays we've seen of late rather than lower-resolution, higher-refresh-rate experiences. DLSS could play a huge part in making both high visual fidelity and high frame rates possible on those displays. We're waiting to see whether GeForce RTX cards hold up their end of the bargain next week, but the company has certainly set high expectations for its next generation of products.

Comments closed
    • CScottG
    • 1 year ago

    [url<]https://www.engadget.com/2018/09/14/nvidia-rtx-mesh-shaders-dlss-tensor-cores/[/url<]

      • drwho
      • 1 year ago

      I wonder about the prices and memory size on the 2060 , 5gb iirc? and how much in gbp , somewhere between £200-£300 I hope , and the lower the better … all these top-end cards are way too expensive

    • DavidC1
    • 1 year ago

    If we are using big, fat supercomputers that guzzle electricity to enhance anti-aliasing that lots of people are not going to even use, I’m going to throw that in the “First World Problem” bin.

    What’s a bit of aliasing between you and me in the heat of action? Pretty much all top tier graphic games are competitive, meaning someone like myself have zero way of noticing all the graphical details.

    • synthtel2
    • 1 year ago

    They’re still trying to compare 4K native performance versus upsampled performance like they’re going to have the same image quality. Yeah, right.

    • leor
    • 1 year ago

    This will be interesting next year when whatever follows Turing comes out, and they boost the raster performance.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 1 year ago

    Sounds interesting, but as always, wait for the independent reviews.

    • ptsant
    • 1 year ago

    I really want to know how DLSS compares, quality-wise, with TAA. Do consider some side to side comparisons. Performance also seems to be better, but this would be secondary for me because these cards seem to easily capture the “baseline” comfortable fps in most situations, including 4k.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    All this talk about 4K, but who seriously games at 4K on their PC? I mean sure it’s pretty and all, but 1440p @ 120 Hz beats the snot out of 4K any day of the week. Don’t tell me “4K gaming is actually tolerable now!” Show me AI turning a 1080p source into a 1440p image at 120 fps minimum, with an imperceptible loss in quality, and I’ll be impressed.

      • Mat3
      • 1 year ago

      I’m fine with 1080p and standard AA methods.

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 1 year ago

        If I had a 4K screen, this is how I would play games. Either that or 1440p windowed.

          • Spunjji
          • 1 year ago

          I’d really like a roughly 27″ 4K display that will do, say, 100+Hz in 1440p mode. I’ll glady take the hit to sharpness in gaming as a kind of free AA (it’s not really any worse than turning on FXAA) and still have the extra resolution at 60Hz for photo editing and suchlike.

      • EzioAs
      • 1 year ago

      People said almost the same thing about 1440p and 1080p. It’s just natural progression. If you prefer the lower option but higher refresh rate, that’s fine. Others prefer something else and that’s fine too. In the future, 4K @ 120/144hz will probably be more common and higher resolution would probably be available as well. We can’t start pushing away options just because they don’t suit what we want.

      • Johnny Rotten
      • 1 year ago

      Ultrawide 3440×1440 is my personal sweet spot for the next 5-8 years…

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 1 year ago

        same

      • bhtooefr
      • 1 year ago

      I do, but then I grew up in an era where 60 FPS was utterly unheard of, and Doom had a 35 FPS framelimiter.

      Also I’m not playing the latest AAA games, so my 1070 gets close or hits to 60 FPS anyway.

      (I run 4K for the added desktop real estate.)

      • vshade
      • 1 year ago

      I do, here 1440p were always very expensive and 4k screens are cheaper than 1440p screens ever were, like 2/3 of the price of the cheapest 1440p monitor I ever saw on sale, and those were 60hz panels

    • Mat3
    • 1 year ago

    Are there screenshot comparisons of true 4k and “AI” 4k anywhere?

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 1 year ago

      I guess we’ll have to wait for that along with everything else. If nothing else, this is the most anticipated review in a long time due to the unsubstantiated hype. I can’t wait to see what all the nerds with deep pockets got with their preorders. If rumors of RTX targeting 1080p are true, then it sounds a lot like VR early adoption. Really cool stuff, but not ready for prime time and prohibitively expensive to get a 2080 Ti that will run it well. Hopefully DLAA adds as much value as they want us to believe.

        • Spunjji
        • 1 year ago

        If it did, they’d have leaked it already. I’m betting on “variable benefit”

    • RoxasForTheWin
    • 1 year ago

    So it’ll probably just be like TSAA and not that much worth using over typical SMAA and MSAA, got it

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 1 year ago

      Given the amount of dedicated hardware built in for it, I certainly hope not.

        • Spunjji
        • 1 year ago

        The dedicated hardware is built for “something else”. This is just their first shot at using it.

        I’m treating this a little like when Apple banged on about their “portrait mode” for the dual-cameras on the iPhone 7+. It was clearly a beta feature; promising hardware with some rushed software for launch. It will be interesting to see where it goes but right now I trust absolutely none of their promotional materials because in my experience so far, AI image processing (like their slow-mo video frame interpolation tech) tends to produce extremely weird edge-case results.

      • Austin
      • 1 year ago

      🙁 I believe so too. From what I’ve heard so far: TSAA comes at very little cost and is making use of the new cores but expect the quality to be sub-par. Just another way of nVidia desperately trying to justify and talk up all the R&D they’ve sunk into RT.

      Could TSAA be the next Quincunx AA? A big deal made of the new feature but not the quality to ever make it worth using.

    • Leader952
    • 1 year ago

    You forgot this graph that actually shows DLSS improvement:

    [url<]https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/NVIDIA-GeForce-RTX-20-Series-4K-Gaming-Performance_2.png[/url<] The graph you show is with DLSS turned OFF

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 1 year ago

      I only work with what Nvidia sent me. If they showed that one as well, it’s intriguing but I didn’t get it from the horse’s mouth, sorry.

      Furthermore, not every game is going to support DLSS and it’s better to think of it as the cherry on top rather than the baseline, especially with older titles.

      In any case I went and watched the GTC Japan keynote video and went and got the second slide.

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 1 year ago

        Wait, that slide says 114 TFLOPS Tensor core at the bottom. Do both of those cards have the same thing or is this another case of misdirection?

        • moose17145
        • 1 year ago

        I really hope NVidia has already sent you one of these so that you guys can do some proper testing, Vs. what AMD did with Vega and give people review samples like less than 24 hours before the NDA lift.

        Edit: Disregard… just saw your “Popping the hood…” article… **goes and fetches more morning caffiene**

          • MOSFET
          • 1 year ago

          *Caffe-ine, like coca-ine

    • Mat3
    • 1 year ago

    “Separately, Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang reiterated that the GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti are ready to power 4K gaming experiences at 60 FPS or better”. I’m sure he said that about the 1080 cards too.

      • sweatshopking
      • 1 year ago

      ain’t nowhere near the balls needed to run brand new 4k games at high settings in the 2k series

      • fullbodydenim
      • 1 year ago

      Really only the 1080 Ti. The GTX 1060 / 1070 / 1080 are in the 30 / 40 / 50 fps club at 4K.

        • DeadOfKnight
        • 1 year ago

        Really only the 1080 Ti in some games, and not on Ultra settings for most of the newer ones.

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