Nvidia delays RTX 2080 Ti general availability to September 27

Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti were meant to be available starting next Friday, September 20, both to pre-order customers and on e-tail and retail shelves. Whether because of overwhelming demand or some other hitch, folks who haven't already gotten in line for the most powerful Turing card will need to wait an extra week to get their hands on one. In a community update posted to its forums, Nvidia says that RTX 2080 Ti cards will be available to all starting September 27. Pre-order customers can expect their RTX 2080 Tis to ship sometime between September 20 and September 27.

While RTX 2080s have been reasonably easy to get in line for via pre-orders even today, RTX 2080 Tis have been scarce as hens' teeth everywhere we've looked. Whatever the reason for the delay on the RTX 2080 Ti, it isn't affecting RTX 2080 customers. Those cards will hit store shelves and pre-order customers' doorsteps starting September 20 as scheduled. Those who were on the fence about dropping $1000 or more on the highest-end Turing card will get a little more time to think about it, if nothing else.

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    • End User
    • 1 year ago

    Balderdash!

    • ronch
    • 1 year ago

    Haven’t we reached the point where even mid-range cards like the 1060 are good enough for pretty much any game out there?

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      If everything was still on DX9 this would have been the case, but then the graphics goalposts are moving even as GPU horsepower increases. In the last few years the target resolution has climbed to 4k, refresh rates from 60Hz to 120/144Hz, and now Nvidia is introducing all this ray tracing stuff.

      I agree with your idea though, which is why I’ve taken to playing games with a ~5 year lag like that [url=https://xkcd.com/606/<]xkcd comic[/url<] suggested. Edit: Removed unnecessary 'and'.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Depending on the resolution and your desired frame rate. 1080p 60Hz the 1060 is great. 1440p 144Hz is for 1080Ti and up.

      • NTMBK
      • 1 year ago

      Once game devs start gearing up for the PS5 generation, we’ll probably see the next big jump in system requirements. Remember the sudden burst of improvements in the year or so before the PS4, as developers started getting their Physically Based Rendering pipelines working?

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      We always have (hence ‘mid-range’), the problem is the ever shifting definition of ‘good enough’. It’s a similar ever-raising bar as a “4K card”: as cards get faster game developers will push up the detail (because faster cards are available) and the bar moves further away again.

      For practical purposes, turning settings down from ULTRA NIGHTMARE OMGWTFBBQ to High (or, horror of horrors, [i<]Medium[/i<]) brings performance requirements down dramatically.

        • bittermann
        • 1 year ago

        That’s why you play games on the pc. The pc culture is different, we are always striving for more. Might as well just get a PS4 or XBox then. Nothing wrong with wanting the best graphics possible. Never understood people scolding others about lowering graphics on the pc?

    • evilpaul
    • 1 year ago

    Microcenter had Ti’s available on the 27th (the page listing 2000 series disappeared in the past two days) from pre-orders. I’m not sure how/why this is a news story.

    • Phartindust
    • 1 year ago

    Hmm seems like shortages are becoming the norm.

    [url<]https://www.tomshardware.com/news/jp-morgan-intel-cpu-shortage-hurt-pc-sales,37797.html[/url<]

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      That’s really only affecting their Skylake-X HCC, XCC and likely upcoming 8-core Coffee Lake SKUs.

      There’s plenty of Kaby Lake, Skylake and 6-core Coffee Lakes to go around.

    • albundy
    • 1 year ago

    why the delay? miners need to make a nickel for the week.

    • Bensam123
    • 1 year ago

    2080ti is the prime candidate for mining, that’s why it’s sold out… however everyone is betting on something without results yet, so…

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      Why are people still mining with video cards when Ether is at an all year low ($183 earlier this week), and there are ASICs out for it now? And if they are, why are they mining with a $1200 card instead of a cheaper $800 card?

        • Bensam123
        • 1 year ago

        There are more coins then just BTC, but yeah mining right now is pretty slim pickings.

        Also in this particular case density and the pricetag scales almost linearly with compute cores, which is a telling sign of mining performance (for compute related algos). Used to be the faster the card, the worse the compute scaling per
        $ spent. With this generation for some reason Nvidia has decided to segment them linearly instead of having a diminishing return for performance for the more expensive cards.

        But that’s all hypothetical, there might be a weird curve ball for performance when they actually hit the market and are mined with.

          • Krogoth
          • 1 year ago

          BTC hasn’t been mined with GPUs in years. The alternative stuff got wiped out with the recent bust of the last craze.

          It is all speculative futures trading for now.

            • Bensam123
            • 1 year ago

            lol… no. Sorry dude, but it’s pretty easy to discern between people who actually actively participate with crypto and those that just ‘speculate’ from the outside.

            It’s still profitable on $.1kwh and not talking about mining BTC, that was a clever retort to him making it seem like only Ethereum is mined. However, as I’ve mentioned, pickings are very slim.

            • Krogoth
            • 1 year ago

            GPU mining for alternative coins is only profitable right now if you have existing hardware that has already paid itself off.

            You aren’t going to be making returns with new hardware purchases anytime soon especially new Turning SKUs.

            It is more likely that Turing SKUs non-gaming usages will end-up being AI-learning on the relative “cheap” by hobbyists.

            • Bensam123
            • 1 year ago

            Profitability by definition just means you’re making money. You’re starting to mince words now between what exactly is a ‘profitable investment’ in terms of ROI and what ‘just’ profitability is.

            As I pointed out in the other post, miners aren’t always the most intelligent bunch, that includes keeping tabs on their profit/loss (power vs income). I’ve seen all sorts, including people who will drink the koolaid and mine a coin into the ground basing it on the coin bouncing back.

            Mining is much bigger then just one coin though, which is why it’s not far fetched for people to buy out preorders. This isn’t store stock. The world isn’t sold out of 2080tis4evar.

            I’m not really sure what world you live in, but the one I remember didn’t involve ‘hobbyists’ buying out $1200 GPUs for fun Vs assuming every GPU miner in the world just packed up their bags and left as soon as price numbers returned to normal.

            But, yup, all my AI hobbyist friends are buying up $1200 GPUs… also my esports friends bought up four each!

            • Krogoth
            • 1 year ago

            Most of them already cut their losses once the big crash came down and loan sharks/debt collectors started to breathe down their necks (Just look at the flood of “lightly used” GPUs on fleabay/craigslist).

            It is only the hardcore crowd (already paid off their capital expenditure) that are holding onto their hardware that are “hibernating”.

            People who are pre-ordering are mostly “must have” latest greatest/latest or people who irrationally fear another GPU mining “craze” that want to get the hardware before prices get inflated. There a smaller number being AI-learning hobbyists who can’t stomach the price of Tesla/Firestreams.

            Only idiotic miners that aren’t broke/debt stricken are going to be buying hardware at this stage of the game.

            • anotherengineer
            • 1 year ago

            What about on 25 cents/kwhr??

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      GPU Mining is dead right now. There isn’t that many Turings chips at the moment and there’s just enough units to satisfy the early-adopters who want the latest and greatest no matter the cost and headaches. There are also some people who fear that a new near-future GPU mining craze would distort prices again so are trying to get them before then. (They imagine 2080Ti going close to $2K while 2070/2080 hover around $1-1.2K mark)

      Yields aren’t great either since current crop of Turning SKUs are huge (bigger than their Pascal predecessors). I don’t expect it to change much at all until the move to TSMC’s 7nm process.

        • Bensam123
        • 1 year ago

        I guess as in less people are participating in it, but if you mean unprofitable that’s untrue.

        It’s weird how people spent the first six months of this year blaming miners and then think they disappear immediately in the next six.

        Just because people aren’t making $5 a gpu and every retail outlet isn’t completely sold out of gpus doesn’t mean miners no longer exist. From what I’ve learned generally speaking most miners are incredibly stupid and will mine things into the ground (that includes going negative). Mining attracts a lot of really stupid people and a handful of smart ones, as do all large risks. That includes hoping on the new generation and praying. Also as I mentioned the 2080ti is the best pick of the litter at least until actual benchmarks come out due to perceived scaling/$.

          • Krogoth
          • 1 year ago

          Most of the miners already sold/trade off their hardware to cut their losses or move onto ASICs. It is only the large-scale hardcore crowd that are enduing on the mining scene (mostly China).

            • Bensam123
            • 1 year ago

            No. There are plenty of miners that are ‘hibernating’ now, which means dark hash at higher power numbers. A lot of people heard the story of the ’14 crash and decide to hang on to their hardware in light of future increases in price at which point higher power cost will become profitable again.

            Also ASICs have been around forever, that’s nothing new. As I mentioned it’s pretty easy to see who just speculates about cryptos from the outside, right now it’s FPGAs that are the worrisome thing. There are plenty of bastions safe from ASICs and developers that are actively changing algos to avoid them. FPGAs are more of a moving target and proving more troublesome to nail down, but that’s being worked on.

            Crypto isn’t just BTC… nor is it just ETH…

            • K-L-Waster
            • 1 year ago

            Ok, but if the miners are hibernating, why would they [b<]also[/b<] be snapping up pre-orders on a card with unknown capabilities? When the market for coins is soft, why commit to new hardware? (Especially pricey hardware...) Would it not make more sense to a) wait to find out if the 2080 TI is [u<]actually[/u<] good at mining and b) wait until there's enough upside again to make the capital expenditure worthwhile?

      • ptsant
      • 1 year ago

      At current prices it is only profitable to mine if you have top notch hardware that has already paid itself AND cheap electricity. Of course, if people stop mining then rewards go up so there is some sort of equilibrium. But most believe that BTC below $4000 is simply not viable at the current difficulty and by extension alt-coins are generally closely priced (in terms of cost to mine/coin value).

      • evilpaul
      • 1 year ago

      Mining what? Molybdenum?

        • dragontamer5788
        • 1 year ago

        My guesses would be ZCash and Monero. But those markets are way smaller than Ethereum, and they too have dropped dramatically recently.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    Nvidia: We’re delaying launch of a product by a week.

    Intel: HOLD MY BEER.

      • ronch
      • 1 year ago

      AMD: raises head to see what’s going on, goes back to sleep.

        • Freon
        • 1 year ago

        AMD cozies around the warmth of VEGA.

    • LocalCitizen
    • 1 year ago

    i guess nvidia under estimated the demand for $1200+ consumer cards
    i think for 7nm they’ll try harder

      • trek205
      • 1 year ago

      Or more realistically they were not able to produce a whole lot of 2080 ti cards yet…

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 1 year ago

      They underestimated how hungry people would be after more than two years since the release of Pascal. I, like many others, try to hold out as long as I can take it if there’s no imminent need to buy now. If you’ve passed on Pascal, and especially if you’ve upgraded your monitor in the past couple years, then I can understand being upset by nonavailability and delays.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      Nope, they know exactly how many units to deploy. They got very good data from the last several generation launches.

      Turing yields are simply not that great (Dang things are almost as large as Volta (GV100) and dwarf the Pascal family)

      • ptsant
      • 1 year ago

      I don’t see any potential upside to NOT satisfying demand. They fixed the price, why not sell as many as possible?

      The yields are probably quite bad. All major e-tailers where I live have said that they get very few units, despite the ridiculously high local prices ($1400 for 2080 Ti).

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