Intel Optane SSD 905P family gets bigger and bolder

We're no strangers around here to Intel's Optane range of devices, and the SSD 905P series clan just got bigger, in both senses of the word. The boys in blue are talking up capacious new takes on Optane SSD 905P devices in both add-in card and U.2 form factors.

Folks with a craving for the lowest storage latencies this side of an enterprise server can get their fix by way of an Optane 905P 1.5-TB add-in card. The new version sports the same black trim with LED illumination as its 960-GB sibling. Meanwhile, the black-and-boxy U.2 side of the family now counts 960-GB and 1.5-TB drives among its members.

As an answer for those wondering why would they need these, the Optane SSD 905 can do up to 575K random read IOPS and 550K write IOPS. Almost as importantly, according to Intel, I/O latency should be under 11 microseconds. That's an entirely new ballgame for storage performance, and I'm drooling at the thought of how much my virtual machine wrangling would benefit from such a storage backend. Regular Joes need not apply, though.

Intel didn't reveal pricing for the new drives and we haven't seen them at e-tail yet. We can, however, do some back-of-the-envelope math. Newegg has the 960-GB Optane SSD 905P for $1200. Assuming linear scaling, that would put the new 1.5-TB version at around $1800. Likewise, since the 480-GB U.2 unit sells for $550, we figure that the 960-GB take on that form factor should command somewhere around $1100, while the 1.5-TB version should go for $1750. We'll see whether those predictions hold when these new drives hit virtual shelves.

Comments closed
    • DarkUltra
    • 1 year ago

    Also don’t forget the natural Power Loss Protection of XPoint SSDs

    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    Too bad about pricing. Optane is the meaningful performance jump over 2.5″ SATA SSDs that would motivate me to upgrade.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      Nvme doesn’t interest you much? I personally wouldn’t see much of a difference between the two interfaces and higher transfer rates.

        • DancinJack
        • 1 year ago

        Honestly I don’t think ANYONE could tell the difference in desktop use between NVMe NAND and Optane. I’d even wager most people, if not all, wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between NVMe NAND and SATA.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 1 year ago

          Agreed, bro.

          • Vhalidictes
          • 1 year ago

          Optane is best at low queue depths that people actually need for desktop use.

          I’d agree that modern NVME drives are super-fast, and you might not be able to tell the difference, but Optane drives should be better for SOHO stuff – at least in theory.

            • DavidC1
            • 1 year ago

            Optane does have an advantage that performance doesn’t degrade with drive being full or suffer from being “dirty”. Also it doesn’t need a DRAM buffer so erasing GBs of files won’t cause temporary slowdowns(that happens even on 960 Pro SSDs).

            However, whether the above advantage or general snappiness you might gain from going to an Optane drive is worth it or not depends on you. Most likely isn’t, as the price increase is quite steep.

            For lot of folks even NVMe NAND premium isn’t worth it. Heck, the market data says significant majority of the market finds SSDs in general to be too pricey.

        • Questar
        • 1 year ago

        Nvme has a lot of protocol overhead.

    • Takeshi7
    • 1 year ago

    Lame. I was actually hoping the 905p would move down in capacity to replace the 480GB 900p.

      • Pwnstar
      • 1 year ago

      Storage should always be going UP in capacity, not down. Don’t look back.

        • Takeshi7
        • 1 year ago

        No. Value should be going up. Capacity should be appropriate for whatever my needs are. If they replaced the 900p with a 905p at the same capacity and price, that would represent an increase in value.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 1 year ago

        I hope you have a 4TB HDD and not a single SSD in your computers.

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