AMD updates OCAT with frame-time visualization and VR HMD tools

AMD's Open Capture and Analysis Tool, or OCAT, is an indispensable tool in gathering frame-time data for modern games. The company has just posted a heads-up about a new build of OCAT, version 1.2, that adds a range of useful capabilities to the tool.

For folks who don't want to pull up Excel or Google Sheets and manually monkey around with plotting frame times against frame numbers, OCAT can now visualize the results of a given test run within the application. It can even plot multiple test runs against one another so you can see the effects of settings changes or other variables on performance. The app can save those visualizations as PDFs for easy sharing and reviewing later.

OCAT offers a performance overlay for keeping an eye on frame rates and frame times, and that overlay now works in VR headsets. The tool captures platform specific data like reprojection events now, too, so users can identify times where the host system isn't necessarily keeping up with a native HMD refresh rate. Users can also toggle data collection from those vendor-specific processing pipelines to isolate performance issues that take place upstream of VR compositors.

Finally, OCAT now gathers platform information about the underlying system. The tool will collect as much data about the host system's hardware as possible, including the operating system, CPU, host OS, graphics driver version, number of graphics cards, and AMD and Nvidia graphics-card names, core clocks, and memory sizes. In addition, the tool can grab AMD graphics-card memory speeds. Information for Intel graphics processors is limited to GPU family, core clock, and memory size.

OCAT is free and easy to use, so if you're at all interested in the graphics performance of your system, you owe it to yourself to download the latest release and give it a try. Hat tip to Keith May on Twitter for the heads-up.

Comments closed
    • willmore
    • 1 year ago

    Completely off topic, but the post made me think of it. If low latency is critical in VR, why are they still using fixed refresh rate displays? Why not go VRR and eliminate the display latency entirely? You also get to skip all the ‘reprojection’ junk as well.

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      You cannot use VRR with low-persistence displays. If the update rate varies, perceptual brightness will also vary.

    • Wonders
    • 1 year ago

    The project’s code on GitHub has a folder called “etc”. Wasson confirmed.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 1 year ago

      I would not doubt it. I think he was in marketing, last I heard, but they would be stupid not to pick his brain about measuring hardware performance.

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    The work of Dr. Damage, I presume?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 1 year ago

      I know Scott was involved in kicking off the project but it’s currently maintained by a team led by Rys Sommefeldt, who TR readers will also recognize as a byline on the site a few times in the past.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        What’s Scott up to these days, or is that classified?

        Since the TR BBQ this year, his twitter feed is just keyboards and NFL.

          • Ryszard
          • 1 year ago

          He and I both work for RTG’s software organisation. Like most folks in our kind of “guiding hand” roles at RTG, we work on a whole bunch of stuff that we’re interested in and care about, and try and leave things in a better state than we found them.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 1 year ago

            How’s crossfire coming along, and why has AMD removed features from the FX APUs that use GCN 1.2, like the new vsync method, wattman and OSD, and video playback and recording options? The video tab was already limited, and now doesn’t even exist in the control panel.

            Also, is AMD ever going to fix the 390 sitting @ 1500mhz memory on the desktop?

        • Ryszard
        • 1 year ago

        And I’d be more than happy to press the keys again for you someday.

    • jihadjoe
    • 1 year ago

    Why are all these analysis tools named after cats? We need more cheese-based processing.

      • YellaChicken
      • 1 year ago

      Processed cheese? No thanks.

        • jihadjoe
        • 1 year ago

        I must’ve missed your answer in the [url=https://techreport.com/news/34077/friday-night-topic-what-are-you-snobbish-about?post=1089878<]what are you snobbish about[/url<] topic.

          • YellaChicken
          • 1 year ago

          I couldn’t put it there because I’m snobbish about FNT too.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      A.) Because marketing types aren’t cheesy enough
      B.) Ceiling Cat demands it

        • Redocbew
        • 1 year ago

        Floor cat thinks the opposite.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 1 year ago

      AutoCAD has Osnap.

      • Growler
      • 1 year ago

      Between Atari and MacOS, all the good cat names are taken.

      • Wirko
      • 1 year ago

      Indeed, only Cheese Analysis Tools should be allowed to bear catly names!

    • GodsMadClown
    • 1 year ago

    Thanks Scott, wherever you are!

      • tipoo
      • 1 year ago

      Scott and Anand are on an island with Biggie and Tupac, I assume

      Or alive and gainfully employed, whatever

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        Scott is still tweeting, so at least we know he’s still alive.

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