Nvidia sets an October 17 release date for the RTX 2070

By now, everyone and their dog has read our reviews covering Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 graphics cards. Their performance potential is pretty massive (particularly with DLSS in play), but the prices they command aren't quite as appetizing as their pixel-pushing prowess. We figure that more than a few of you are eyeing the GeForce RTX 2070 as a potential buy, but there's been no word on its release until now.

As Nvidia's tweet above shows, the company expects GeForce RTX 2070 cards in stores around in just a little over three weeks' time on October 17. The "factory-overclocked" Founders Edition card will go for $599 and is specced for a nominal 1710 MHz boost clock. The plain-jane GeForce RTX 2070 should should come at $499, and its rated clock speed is 1620 MHz. As was the case with Pascal before it, Turing's auto-sensing mojo should push those figures higher as long as thermals and power delivery allow.

As a quick recap, the chip atop the GeForce RTX 2070 has 2304 shader processors, and its 256-bit wide path to 8 GB of GDDR6 is good for 448 GB/s of bandwidth. Nvidia says the card should pull 185 W of juice, which looks like a fairly frugal amount considering the potential horsepower on hand. Interested buyers can preorder a Founder's Edition card directly from Nvidia's store.

Comments closed
    • travbrad
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]The plain-jane GeForce RTX 2070 [b<]should should[/b<] come at $499[/quote<] Not even 2 shoulds will make it true but I admire your optimism.

    • Bauxite
    • 1 year ago

    Meanwhile new 1080tis that spank this are already at 600 and falling, also the used market is prime for plucking those dirt cheap from drooling fanboys and their preorders.

    2070 will run RTX stuff like a dog, yay marketing.

      • Krogoth
      • 1 year ago

      It is the “Geforce3 Ti200” of its family. It’ll handle current stuff just fine but anything that tries to use its new features will be too slow even for tech demos.

        • tipoo
        • 1 year ago

        Reminds me of early tessellation units too. The 360s was seldom used because it was quite slow.

          • Krogoth
          • 1 year ago

          You mean 460s. 😉

          3xx Geforce series were re branded 2xx SKUs for OEMs only.

            • tipoo
            • 1 year ago

            No, like the Xbox 360 lol. The Xenos had an early tessellation unit but it was used a sparse few times, couldn’t really do all the world size of the generation.

      • Freon
      • 1 year ago

      Bingo, at least until the current stock of 1080 Tis runs dry. I’ve seen them as low as $529 new in box. <$600 is certainly doable if you watch for a deal carefully and click buy without too much hesitation.

      • mikepers
      • 1 year ago

      I’m not seeing new 1080ti’s for even $599 – if anything, I think the prices have moved back up a bit as they realized the 1080Ti’s are pretty competitive with the 2080’s and the latter are priced at at least $800….

      Currently on Newegg the lowest 1080Ti is $649

      At around $550 I would have pulled the trigger on one….

    • albundy
    • 1 year ago

    still running my 970. see you in a few years. maybe a decade.

    • Shinare
    • 1 year ago

    My top of the line, latest technology 8800GTX was $500 at the time. It was a stretch but I thought it was worth it. Now top of the line latest technology cards are > $1000 and the lessers are in that range…

    Now lemme go think about dropping a grand or more on a phone…. when did $1,000 become toss-away money for life’s ancillaries?

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]My top of the line, latest technology 8800GTX[/quote<] Did you forget about the $800+ 8800 Ultra?

      • yokem55
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]when did $1,000 become toss-away money for life's ancillaries?[/quote<] When the practical life spans of these devices grew from a year to 18 months to 3-4 years. They became durable goods that you make an investment in for a longer period of time. So, effectively more money became available over time and drove up the prices.

        • ptsant
        • 1 year ago

        This is true, but it also means that the market is much less exciting…

      • DavidC1
      • 1 year ago

      When companies realized they have zero competition and a fan base that would pay for higher prices leading to much bigger bottom lines.

      For phones, minimum wage earners and 3rd world countries run around with Samsung Galaxies and iPhones.

      • Kretschmer
      • 1 year ago

      The world has expanded, and multinationals can market to the cream of the crop across many nations. On top of that, these cards are orders of magnitude more complex and expensive to produce than an 8800GTX, offering a much richer experience. Similarly, the first iPhone was a basic device compared to today’s monsters.

      The good news is that slightly older tech still gives you a great experience, so you don’t feel compelled to upgrade as often as in 2007.

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]when did $1,000 become toss-away money for life's ancillaries?[/quote<] Oh man, wait till you get into a really expensive hobby... like motor racing. A guy I hang out with just spent $2000 on tires (Pilot Sport Cup 2s) and corded them in a single track day! A long time ago I also used to do rallycross and go-karts and very quickly decided to stop keeping track of expenses altogether. Building a $5000 PC every 2-3 years is peanuts by comparison.

        • ptsant
        • 1 year ago

        Well, this is a very nice argument, but that does not apply to individuals, rather to the concept of a hobby as a whole. You see, even though I’d love to go into motor racing, I can’t really afford it. I also can’t afford to fly a private jet or buy a new megayacht every 5 years.

        My point is that the cost of tech is one of the reasons why tech is my hobby. I can afford a $200-300 GPU every 2 years and minor upgrades every year (a new mouse, a new keyboard, a new PSU etc). So, it gives me pleasure AND I can afford it.

        Tech as a hobby won’t disappear if it costs $10k per year to see meaningful improvements. Some people will still buy $10k GPUs. But it will stop being MY hobby. That’s the whole point of the discussion, not the existence of a friend-of-a-friend who spends $3k in a Saturday morning.

      • Freon
      • 1 year ago

      The same time when people started to pay $25 to have their McDonalds delivered to them, or $15 to have some drive them to the corner gas station to get cigarettes, etc.

      Economy is booming, there’s a lot of disposable income kicking around.

        • NTMBK
        • 1 year ago

        [quote<] Inequality is booming [/quote<] FTFY

      • Wonders
      • 1 year ago

      Think of it this way. You can still spend $500 on a graphics card, or a phone, and it will be more powerful than a $500 device has ever been before. It’s just now there’s expanded options at the top end, too. It just means the market is growing – that’s all.

      Now, if next generation’s $500 device performs worse, THEN it’s time to ask the tough questions, and demand answers.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 1 year ago

      Most people waste a lot more money than that each year. Look at how much people spend eating out now compared to 20 years ago. Some people choose to eat out every day, others choose to build a $3000 computer, the only difference is that one is a lot thinner.

        • ptsant
        • 1 year ago

        I’m not sure that spending time in front of the computer is good for the waistline, either.

          • Liron
          • 1 year ago

          BoxVR FTW!

    • drfish
    • 1 year ago

    Still waiting for those mystical $999 AIB 2080 Tis… Any second now, I’m sure…

      • ptsant
      • 1 year ago
        • Bauxite
        • 1 year ago

        woosh

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 1 year ago

      AIB? First thing I thought of was the AIW’s, ATI’s All in Wonder cards that hard the video tuners on them. I still have one kicking around somewhere. Shame they never worked with ATSC.

        • drfish
        • 1 year ago

        Add In Board, partner cards, Asus, EVGA, MSI, Gigabyte, etc.

        I’m not much of an overclocker, but I want the option, so I’m at least waiting for cards with souped-up power vs. the FE cards. Ideally, they would be cheaper too, but I’m not holding my breath for that part.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    That’s cool. When are they releasing all the cards for people who didn’t preorder?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This