Oculus Quest turns standalone VR inside-out for $399

Oculus has long offered a way for budding VR users to dip a toe into virtual worlds with its Go headset, but that pair of goggles offers only rudimentary tracking mechanisms and control of virtual environments. At its Oculus Connect 5 conference today, the company bridged the gap between the Go and the Rift with the Quest headset. The Quest is a standalone visor that offers inside-out tracking, the full range of Touch hand controls, and a new twist from Oculus hardware: the potential to go beyond single-room virtual experiences thanks to Insight, a technology that the company says allows its Guardian barriers to handle multiple rooms.

Inside the Quest, VR-nauts will find the same 3200×1440 screen that runs the show in the Oculus Go. The Quest includes a lens-spacing adjustment to achieve the best possible optical performance, though. The company says it also worked to improve the Quest's built-in audio for an immersive sound with deeper bass. If the Oculus VR experience has you hooked, but you don't want the hassle of setting up a fully PC-powered VR system, the Quest will offer 64 GB of storage and compatibility with over 50 titles at launch for $399 when it launches in spring 2019.

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    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    What I want to see is Oculus’ answer to the Vive Pro+WiGig. At first I thought this was it…

    • Pickle Nose
    • 1 year ago

    Spring of 2019? lol

    • DavidC1
    • 1 year ago

    6DOF is worth it, but not for twice the price of the Go, and also because the regular Oculus can be had for the same.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    That is cool, but it seems weird to ignore the massive processing power of my PC. Has there been any advances on wireless transmission of inputs/graphics, or is it still nausea city?

    • nico1982
    • 1 year ago

    Nice. We are toying with the Go, and it is surprisingly good: for simple VR apps is closer to the Rift than a Cardboard with the added bonus of mobility. This will be even better. It runs on a Snapdragon XR1?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      [url=https://www.oculus.com/blog/introducing-oculus-quest-our-first-6dof-all-in-one-vr-system-launching-spring-2019/<]Their announcement[/url<] doesn't say what SoC is aboard. Qualcomm's [url=https://www.qualcomm.com/products/snapdragon-xr1-platform<]XR1 page[/url<] doesn't get into details of what the SoC uses, so there's still all kinds of mystery.

        • TravelMug
        • 1 year ago

        It has a Snapdragon 835 inside:

        [url<]https://developer.oculus.com/blog/introducing-oculus-quest-our-first-6dof-all-in-one-vr-system/[/url<] No info about the RAM, but the Go has 3GB, this has probably 4GB based on the fact that that's the minimum amount any device with this SoC has.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 1 year ago

      not unless the screen improves. $200, trial into VR–Go is great.

      $400, with multiroom stuff and still the pretty bad display? No thanks.

      dunno how much a better display would cost, but hitting $500 or $600 with a good display would make the product so much better.

      But I’m more sensitive to displays than most, I feel.

        • TravelMug
        • 1 year ago

        [quote<]hitting $500 or $600 with a good display would make the product so much better[/quote<] Technologically better, yes, but it would also completely miss the target market. The market where the potential buyers are willing to spend $499 or even $599 for a mobile SoC VR device is much much smaller than the $399 market. Just ask Lenovo how the Mirage Solo is doing or HTC how the Vive Focus is doing. From the looks of it, not great. This one for $399, way better 6DOF with 6DOF controllers as well and the large software library is a much more inviting proposition than the other two.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 1 year ago

          Who cares how large the software library or the freedom 6DOF brings if you can’t look at the screen for more than 10-15 minutes?

          Again, may well just be my sensitivity to displays.

          If $50-70 higher BoM ($100 retail) on the display can get a meaningfully better display, it would allow the product let it’s 6DOF features actually be used. At least for me.

          But I don’t know what the common consensus about the Go’s display is.

            • TravelMug
            • 1 year ago

            [quote<]Again, may well just be my sensitivity to displays.[/quote<] I think this might be it. I know what you are talking about, I could not use GearVR with the S7 due to the extensive flickering and I can see the Go screen flickering when in 60Hz mode in some apps, it really depends what's on the screen, but it's not to the point of being unusable. It's mostly short bursts when large homogeneous bright areas are visible. In 72Hz it's all good and it looks like the Quest titles will all be mostly aiming for 72Hz.

        • psuedonymous
        • 1 year ago

        It has a pair of 1600×1200 OLED panels (likely the same Samsung panels as the Vive Pro) vs. the Go’s single 2560×1200 (1280×1200 per eye) LCD in the Go. This was part of the unveil announcement.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 1 year ago

          Not what the article says?

          “Inside the Quest, VR-nauts will find the same 3200×1440 screen that runs the show in the Oculus Go.”

            • psuedonymous
            • 1 year ago

            Which is doubly incorrect: the Oculus Go does not have a 3200×1440 screen, and the Oculus Quest does not even have a single panel (two separate panel+optics assemblies to allow for IPD adjustment).

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