Aorus GeForce RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G flexes for the camera

Gigabyte has already revealed its first custom takes on the GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti, but it was only a matter of time before more extreme versions of those cards emerged from the company's Aorus division. Now, a product page for the Aorus RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G has hit Gigabyte's web site, and as we've come to expect from Aorus pixel-pushers, the results are tantalizing.

The Aorus RTX 2080 cooler starts with Gigabyte's so-called "stack fan" cooler, which uses overlapping rotors fixed at different heights to provide room for larger fans without (greatly) increasing the overall size of the graphics card. As anybody sensitive to noise knows, larger, slower-moving fans tend to be better for keeping graphics-card rackets to a minimum, and Gigabyte's trio of 100-mm fans is a welcome sight. The core and memory clocks this cooler unleashes remain to be seen, however.

Source: @AORUS_LATAM

According to Gigabyte's mini-site, the Aorus RTX 2080 follows the Founders Edition card's eight-plus-two-phase power-delivery subsystem, although the company does upgrade the power plugs on this board to a pair of eight-pin inputs versus the six-plus-eight-pin connection on the RTX 2080 FE. LEDs above those plugs will illuminate if there are any power-delivery problems in the course of operation.

The display outputs on the Aorus RTX 2080 look ready to accommodate most multi-monitor setups. The company put three each of DisplayPort and HDMI outputs on this card. They can be used as trios of either DisplayPort or HDMI outs alongside one further connection from the opposite type of plug, for a total of four simultaneous displays. The VirtualLink USB Type-C port remains available at all times.

Befitting a gaming-focused product in 2018, the Aorus RTX cooler features sequential RGB LEDs around each of those 100-mm fans. Gigabyte uses those LEDs to display any of 12 preset lighting effects, ranging from mild to wild. An RGB LED-illuminated Aorus logo on the back of the card leaves no doubt about builders' allegiance. Pricing and availability for this card remain open questions at the moment, but we'll be keeping our eagle eyes open for more info as it arrives.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 1 year ago

    Aorus cards on the other hand use double ball bearings. Haven’t had a single fan failure with these cards compared to their normal series with the crappy sleeve bearings. ^^

    • psuedonymous
    • 1 year ago

    Of course it looks utterly awful, but [url=https://www.overclock3d.net/news/gpu_displays/galax_crowns_themselves_the_king_of_turing_with_their_rtx_2080_ti_hall_of_fame/1<]at least it doesn't have a giant golden plastic crown attached to the side[/url<]. Sadly, that is a high bar for AIB card design nowadays.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 1 year ago

      Wow… so that’s a thing, is it? SMH.

    • K-L-Waster
    • 1 year ago

    Conspiracy Theory: NVidia is forcing AIB makers to produce these ridiculous cooler designs so that customers buy more Founders Edition cards instead. “Yes, it’s more expensive, but it’s a small price to pay to keep my eyeballs from bleeding.”

    • Voldenuit
    • 1 year ago

    Hopefully, this (and other) custom card(s) will have higher power delivery limits than the FEs. GamersNexus tested a 2080Ti with a beefy water cooler, and found that even with core temps ludicrously below air cooling (and VRM and memory temps in check, in case you were wondering), the boost clocks of the TU102 were capped by the power limit.

    Take a further second to realize that on current non-RT titles, fully half the silicon on all the Turing cards is essentially dark during benchmarks. That means no active RT cores, no active Tensor cores, and those discrete Int shaders are probably sitting around twiddling their thumbs in most games.

    Light up these units in RTX-branded games, and suddenly, the power budget of these cards will shoot up, and whatever meager power budget headroom looks so amenable to overclocking is suddenly all gone.

    I hope this is just FUD, but to all the people who say that we haven’t seen the Turing cards at their best yet, I caution that we may not have seen them at their worst, either.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 1 year ago

      While running DLSS demos with our test system connected to a Watts Up, I didn’t see any difference in power consumption between that and standard TAA. What’s more likely is that the card will remain within its power budget regardless of what functional units it’s using; you’ll just see a redistribution of that power to different functional units.

        • DPete27
        • 1 year ago

        If that’s happening though, the power budget is being pulled away from the SPs right? Therefore there [i<]should[/i<] be a clockspeed difference when the RT and Tensor cores power on.

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]Hopefully, this (and other) custom card(s) will have higher power delivery limits than the FEs. [/quote<] From [url=https://i.imgur.com/XEDpJiq.jpg<]Derbauer's testing[/url<], you gain even more performance from a pure memory OC than from pushing up the power target and fan target to max. And even if you use hardware voltmodding (bypassing the shunt resistors and resetting the powermon IC) along with subambient cooling, you can push voltage and power consumption as high as you want can gain effectively nothing over just manual OC of an unmodified FE card. AIB cards with higher power target limits and bigger & more plastic-laden coolers may expand your e-penis, but they won't actually net any performance benefit over an FE card.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    I remember when people made fun of Michael Bay for producing an entire movie series based on these exact graphics cards. Autobots wage their battle to destroy the evil forces of the Decepticons…IN YOUR PC!!!

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    This is a [b<]/facepalm[/b<] product.

    • DancinJack
    • 1 year ago

    [s<]ASUS[/s<]GIGABYTE AORUS marketing: "You engineers and your 'physics.' You know what this needs? Big plastic shields in front of the fans so it can look really cool and not cool as well." Engineering/Product: "Mark, I'm not sure that's a good idea." Marketing: "Okie dokie! We'll go ahead and add them to the marketing materials! Go ahead and get started!" A+ product. More plastic needed though.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 1 year ago

      Nope–more cowbell needed.

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      >ASUS marketing: “You engineers and your ‘physics.’ You know what this needs? Big plastic shields in front of the fans so it can look really cool and not cool as well.”

      Uh, you *do* realize that Aorus is a Gigabyte brand and not an ASUS brand, right? The ASUS equivalent would be their ROG line.

        • Pulsar_the_Spacenerd
        • 1 year ago

        It appears that we can no longer keep straight all of the companies’ 2+ different brands that exist because Asus and Gigabyte don’t sound G@merz enough.

          • psuedonymous
          • 1 year ago

          Quiet you, those ‘gaming’ brands are apparently extremely valuable to the companies that have supposedly spent years of effort to build them, and are not at all indistinguishable from each other and completely interchangeable!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        they kinda look alike. OTOH they’re very different. 😆

      • leor
      • 1 year ago

      I read Asus too at first, this is Gigabyte.

        • DancinJack
        • 1 year ago

        ugh, my bad. I know the difference, just read it wrong.

      • Shobai
      • 1 year ago

      The middle fan looks like it /might/ be mounted to the shroud, which might explain the plastic there. The outer fans are mounted conventionally, though. In any case the plastic is intended to help save your fingers.

      I’m just left with more questions:
      – how well cooled are the areas of overlap between counter-rotating blades?
      – those renders are pretty poor, so where exactly are the LED’s mounted?

      • Redocbew
      • 1 year ago

      Engineering: I really don’t think that’s a good idea.

      Marketing: But it needs a fan shroud! And three is better than one!

      Engineering: A fan shroud for when it’s inside the case?

      Marketing: But cases have windows now!

      Engineering: sigh….

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