Report: bug in Windows 10 October 2018 update might delete user data

Our wannabe fictional overlord Josh Pozzolo (aka sweatshopking) just reviewed Microsoft Windows 10's October 2018 update, and he pretty much likes it. I've installed it myself on my main box with nary a hitch, and I've enjoying some of the new features. Unfortunately, not every Windows 10 user is experiencing that kind of smooth sailing after the upgrade to build 1809. It seems that the update freed up a little too much hard drive space for some people, by way of deleting their documents.

Multiple reports are popping up at various corners of the web from users claiming that their data vanished in a puff of smoke after running the October 2018 update. Whatever bug was apparently triggered wasn't all that picky with what data it ate, seeing as many reports mention that the entirety of the Documents folder was gobbled up. 

The exact cause of the issue is yet to be determined, though some folks are pointing their fingers to an erroneously-triggered Group Policy setting that would delete a user's profile after a given period of time. Having said that, some of the affected users are running Windows 10 Home, meaning they're highly unlikely to have that setting enabled. It's possible that a specific upgrade method could have triggered the issue. For what it's worth, I just ran an Update through Settings as usual.

Windows Central remarks that although Windows often saves its old installation and a copy of user settings into C:\Windows.old, some users dug there in hopes of finding their lost data only to come up empty-handed. There's yet no official word from Microsoft on this situation, so we'd advise anyone installing the October 2018 Update to have a full backup handy.

Comments closed
    • just brew it!
    • 11 months ago

    It seems I need to repeat this every 6 months or so: “If you let the Cloud manage your data, you are no longer in control your data.”

    I was mildly disturbed when Microsoft rolled out the automatic Cloud archiving feature, but figured “Hey, for most Windows users this is probably a net win.” And it probably would be, if not for Microsoft screwing it up like they seem to have done with this update…

    • DoomGuy64
    • 11 months ago

    The previous update screwed over audio drivers, now this…. Who’s testing these updates?

      • bthylafh
      • 11 months ago

      We are.

        • Shobai
        • 11 months ago

        Is it true that they’re using DevOps?

          • bthylafh
          • 11 months ago

          No idea.

    • Zizy
    • 11 months ago

    I guess it is something as simple as “these thingies are supposedly duplicated in user’s OneDrive, let’s free some space for them”… but the files actually aren’t there and are now gone for good. The new version is more pushy to let it clear some space for you even excluding this bug.

    • joselillo_25
    • 11 months ago

    Just for the note and to compensate all the bad press, every upgrade of win 10 makes my ancient q6600 faster, the black theme is super nice etc…. I would love if Microsoft continue with this upgrade policy.

    Not an very interesting comment but I find amazing that I could still use a 10 year computer with this level of perfomance and new features, specially if you have lived the days were you need to buy a new computer with every OS release.

      • End User
      • 11 months ago

      You can thank both M and ARM class CPUs as Microsoft targeted usability at that performance level.

      [url<]https://browser.geekbench.com/processors/321[/url<] That being said your Q6600 runs at ultra mobile performance levels.

    • albundy
    • 11 months ago

    i never use default folders, mainly because i dont trust any company, ever. you never know what they can do with the data, and i always assume the worst.

    • anotherengineer
    • 11 months ago

    did they pull the update? the other day it said october 2018, now it’s back to April

    [url<]https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10[/url<]

      • Voldenuit
      • 11 months ago

      So they rolled back to 1803?

      “Sorry guys, if the IRS sticks you in jail for not keeping records for 5 years, that’s our bad.”

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 months ago

      Probably a good idea, considering the issues. 1809 is gone from my MSDN account, too. It was there earlier today. Now it’s 1803 and lower.

        • anotherengineer
        • 11 months ago

        ok wow, so I guess they did officially pull it then, just didn’t see an ‘official’ statement from MS saying that, but if it’s gone from MSDN……………………..

    • Yan
    • 11 months ago

    I’m still using Windows 7 and I’ll keep it that way, thank you very much.

      • odizzido
      • 11 months ago

      Yup same here. I can’t see anything but problems moving to 10.

      • End User
      • 11 months ago

      Window 7 is so old the version of Mac OS X released the same year still ran PowerPC apps.

        • meerkt
        • 11 months ago

        Windows 7 is so old that the UI still used color.

          • Wirko
          • 11 months ago

          So did 8. But 7 is so old that the UI still used color reasonably.

          • Chrispy_
          • 11 months ago

          [quote<]Roses are grey, Violets are grey, I'm dead and colorblind.[/quote<]

        • f0d
        • 11 months ago

        OSX no longer runs ppc apps?
        That’s some pretty horrible backwards compatibility – even my Xbox one can run ppc xbox 360 games
        W7 isn’t even 10 years old yet

        I’m glad I went back to 7, I find I can just get shit done and don’t have to even think of the operating system which is what an os should do imo

        Also I think I’d rather be hacked than have my userdata deleted on me I don’t really have any interesting info a hacker could use but its valuable to me

          • OptimumSlinky
          • 11 months ago

          [quote<] That's some pretty horrible backwards compatibility - even my Xbox one can run ppc xbox 360 games [/quote<] Xbox One does it through emulation actually. Digital Foundry did an awesome breakdown on how BC works despite the vastly different CPUs: [url<]https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-2017-xbox-one-x-back-compat-how-does-it-actually-work[/url<]

          • BurntMyBacon
          • 11 months ago

          [quote=”f0d”<]Also I think I'd rather be hacked than have my userdata deleted on me I don't really have any interesting info a hacker could use but its valuable to me[/quote<] Normally I cringe at the "I've got nothing to hide" mentality, but an objective cost analysis would lead me to a similar conclusion if I had to choose between (potentially) everyone gets access to the data or nobody (including me) does.

          • End User
          • 11 months ago

          It speaks to the health of the current OS. Ideally you want devs to move forward with the platform.

          I get sh!t done with Linux, iOS, and macOS. Windows 10 is for gaming.

        • Yan
        • 11 months ago

        Windows 7 is so old that it doesn’t have modern conveniences like deleting your files when you update.

          • kvndoom
          • 11 months ago

          It was an undocumented implementation of Windows 10’s new “Automatic Disk Cleanup”… not a bug, but a feature!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 months ago

        I don’t think that’s true. The version of Mac OS X released the same year (2009) was Snow Leopard.

          • End User
          • 11 months ago

          Which was the first version of Mac OS X to drop support for PowerPC processors and the last to support PowerPC apps via Rosetta.

      • Pwnstar
      • 11 months ago

      Get with the times, grandpa.

      • just brew it!
      • 11 months ago

      Windows 7 was the last version I used regularly. These days I am 100% Linux at home, and (as a rough guesstimate) 97% Linux and 3% OS X at work.

      • barich
      • 11 months ago

      Still using iPhone OS 3? How about OS X Snow Leopard? How about Android Eclair?

      Windows 7 is *that* old.

        • kvndoom
        • 11 months ago

        Windows 7 still gets updates. Your point is?

        • Shouefref
        • 11 months ago

        That’s a bit of a stupid remark, because early Androids were bad. Not worth the name “os”.

      • kvndoom
      • 11 months ago

      I’m right with you- 15 more months!

      Who knows, maybe by then Windows 10 will have a decent QA process!

        • jihadjoe
        • 11 months ago

        Or MS will have decided to distance itself from this mess and Windows 11 will be out.

        • egon
        • 11 months ago

        Or if it doesn’t, 8.1 is stable and supported until 2023 and has some of the worthwhile post-7 improvements, while the less palatable aspects can be dealt with very effectively by Classic Shell.

          • kvndoom
          • 11 months ago

          Classic Shell is now renamed Open Shell by the people who took over the source code.

          But what a lifesaver! My wife’s Core2 Win7 box just got to running too slow for thedesign software she uses. Her new Ryzen PC of course came with Windows 10, but by installing Open Shell and using the Windows 7 start menu she doesn’t even notice the difference. I just hope none of her data got nuked.

    • juzz86
    • 11 months ago

    Little discovery last night, I found out that the Admin-level Disk Cleanup now also includes an option to clear the ‘Downloads’ folder – whoops!

    Serves me right for not reading of course, but that’s been a tick-and-flick screen for years for me!

      • MOSFET
      • 11 months ago

      That one caught me the first time too. Fortunately it was on a test VM, which of course is why that VM is there.

        • juzz86
        • 11 months ago

        Oh that’s handy mate, I’m very glad it was my own machine and not someone else’s!

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 months ago

      Cool. I rarely reuse files more than a few minutes after initial download.

        • juzz86
        • 11 months ago

        This one’s for you then my friend!

    • Voldenuit
    • 11 months ago

    Come to think of it, an update to the article on how to defer FU2 might be handy.

    Pro users can just turn off updates in Group Policy Editor.

    Home users on wifi can set their wifi as a ‘metered connection’, in which case windows update won’t auto download the update.

    You could disable the windows update service in services.msc.

    Any others?

      • arunphilip
      • 11 months ago

      Firewall rule to block connections to the WU servers, is another one.
      Preferable as you’re not relying on any Windows setting (if done at the home router).

      In response to BurntMyBacon’s comment, this page has a list of recommended servers, and is applicable to Windows 10: [url<]https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3084568/can-t-download-updates-from-windows-update-from-behind-a-firewall-or-p[/url<]

        • BurntMyBacon
        • 11 months ago

        This suggestion would be more helpful if accompanied by a known and vetted list of WU servers to block.

          • arunphilip
          • 11 months ago

          Fair point, I’ve updated my original comment to point to a list from Microsoft itself (obviously, it is a list of what must be enabled to make WU work).

    • Voldenuit
    • 11 months ago

    The one I’ve heard was that the files got deleted if a user did not have their My Documents/Pictures/Music etc. marked for sharing/syncing with OneDrive.

    Maybe MS created a blank template for the folders on their cloud image, and overwrote the local folders with the blank ones as a consequence?

      • K-L-Waster
      • 11 months ago

      That sounds amateurish, careless, and stupid.

      So given this is Microsoft we’re talking about, you’re probably on to something.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 months ago

      My guess is that it was supposed to clear space by archiving to OneDrive if OneDrive was turned on, but it didn’t check to see if they had it turned on before it started wiping stuff.

    • DancinJack
    • 11 months ago

    Those folders, while at times make things easier, are never, ever, ever used on my machines. They’re just too annoying to me. App devs just dump whatever they want into those folders and I have to move stuff all the time and it’s super annoying.

    Make your own folders to put stuff in if possible.
    Back your stuff up.

      • Ryhadar
      • 11 months ago

      “My Documents” is most abused, I think. I still use the defaults but under My Docs I have a folder listed as “_MyActualDocuments” to avoid confusion. 😀

        • DancinJack
        • 11 months ago

        Absolutely, though I think it’s just “Documents” now. But it’s insane. Mine has game files for some reason–mostly save games, Office files, Audacity files, and more crap for no reason. Nothing super important, but it’s still annoying it’s all just dumped there.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 11 months ago

        I have a shortcut to a real document folder that’s somewhere else entirely.

        • Shouefref
        • 11 months ago

        I also avoid MyDocuments.

    • Chrispy_
    • 11 months ago

    I genuinely hate the users folder in Windows. Microsoft and app developers abuse it, and the permissions are screwed around with by all manner of processes.

    The fact than an update has screwed up that mess of Microsoft’s own making is about as surprising to me as discovering that water is, in fact, wet.

      • meerkt
      • 11 months ago

      Do real techies use it at all?

        • Redocbew
        • 11 months ago

        I’ve developed a sense of benign neglect for the users folder in Windows. If apps put stuff there I don’t try to persuade them otherwise. However, for setting up dev sites and any other “real work” I need to do I usually stay away from it. I’ve run into the kind of permissions issues Chrispy mentioned too many times, and I’m not very inclined to investigate the reasons behind it when I can just put my stuff somewhere else.

          • Voldenuit
          • 11 months ago

          Here’s an interesting question: ‘My Documents’ etc are all symlinks to c:\users\user\my documents.

          If you symlink your ‘My Documents’ to a custom folder, say on a separate drive, are those also in danger of getting deleted by the update?

            • meerkt
            • 11 months ago

            I’d say yes.

            • DPete27
            • 11 months ago

            I can never seem to get the process of migrating the user shortcuts like “my documents” to another location right. Last time I tried I nearly had to reinstall the OS to reverse my mistake. Additionally frustrating was that, after trying and failing, every online guide I found described the exact same procedure I had used.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 11 months ago

            Relocation has always been painless for me:
            Open file explorer, right-click on the “Downloads”, “Music”, etc. link, select properties, click on the “Location” tab, then click on the “Move” button.

            • Chrispy_
            • 11 months ago

            If they were truly symlinks, then under Windows/NTFS behaviour for symlinks they [i<]ought[/i<] to be safe. The problem with those stupid fake Microsoft user folders is that they're not normal symlinks, I think they're junction points based on NTFS reparse and they behave more like hard links than symbolic links under certain circumstances. It definitely screws up some of the more dated backup/recovery/undelete tools, even from big names like Symantec. I wouldn't be at all surprised if this bug is because someone at MS forgot about the difference between junction points and symlinks. They behave very similarly and work on similar principles but the devil is in the details.

            • Voldenuit
            • 11 months ago

            Man, I haven’t thought of Junction points since the days of Steam Mover and having to fudge games being on a different drive than C:\.

            • meerkt
            • 11 months ago

            I don’t think deletion behaves differently in symlinks and junctions. The target (of a junction) was deleted only up to XP.

            Trivia: At least in Win8 all of Microsoft’s compatibility directories are junctions, except for “Users\All Users” which is a symlink.

          • meerkt
          • 11 months ago

          The only viable way to use it is to auto-backup or symlink (out to one’s actual docs tree) specific files, or in some cases directories, in the rare cases you find one that isn’t a complete junkyard. The problem is that it usually requires per-app research.

          If the likes of Mozilla can’t understand that actual user generated and collected data should be placed separate from temp files, auto-generated files, and behind-the-scenes downloaded db updates and such, what hope is there?

        • Chrispy_
        • 11 months ago

        For our own stuff? Hell no.

        But most software will dump stuff in there, ranging from settings and saves to encrypted DRM rubbish – If you lose it you’re effectively having every single application you’ve tailored factory-reset, and that can mean licenses, plugins, data, and other useful stuff gone that may have taken a while to set up over the last year(s)

        Of course, you can backup these folders but owing to the permissions/security/encryption/ownership/UAC issues I was hinting at, that’s genuinely not as simple as you’d expect it to be.

        • Ryu Connor
        • 11 months ago

        Yes.

        How many times do I have to remind you, that you are not normal. Not even in IT circles do your adventures represent any sort of normalcy.

        The user directory is the exacting equivalent to the /home directory in Linux.

          • meerkt
          • 11 months ago

          See, Chrispy is also adventurous. 🙂

          %homepath% is a dumping grounds with no rhyme or reason. It would be a mess even if people followed Microsoft’s guidelines. In cases where you have a say, why would you want to knowingly drop files into that abyss?

          PS: Speaking of *nix, I find it quite annoying that some supposed Windows software create dot-prefixed dirs under %homepath%. Quite uncivil. When in Windows do it Windows-like, especially when these foreign conventions are counterproductive.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            There is plenty of rhyme and reason.

            That you don’t find rhyme and reason to it, speaks to only to your thought process.

            One of the typical complaints is that Microsoft decides to reinvent a wheel. In this case, they did no such thing. They followed the /home directory concept out of Unix and Linux to a tee.

            The home directory structure does not exist in a vacuum. Just like in Linux and Unix, the permission structure of every other directory that exists off the root forces applications and users to have to more or less live out of their home directory. This one part of a larger proper multi-user design, least privilege design, and the corresponding security it requires.

            That you suddenly retort, “But I don’t need multi-user or least privilege” is irrelevant. Linux isn’t doing to ditch it’s multi-user or least privilege design either. I’m afraid you’re just gonna have to adapt, which apparently you already do, but don’t use that as a sign that you’re not doing something weird.

            This entire conversation borne from ignorance of collection pedantic details. Unfortunately that minutia is a huge deal when collectively pooled together and thus it matters.

            • Chrispy_
            • 11 months ago

            Sounds like you’re derailing a thread here just to pick a fight. On windows, Microsoft (through poor best-practice advice to developments and tardy, overdue piecemeal adoption of the ‘nix ways) have incubated a nightmare situation where users are encouraged to save their personal documents in a location that is used as a dumping ground for non-document, user-specific application data.

            I’m sorry, but the Windows user root and personal folders (documents, music, pictures etc) are polluted incessantly by applications, drivers, and the OS itself. All of the abyssal junk that doesn’t belong in there ought to be placed in the AppData folder, but even big names that should be doing things right are failing. savegames get dumped in documents, Microsoft uses the user root folder for it’s own backups and settings (Edge backup, Bing stuff, XBox etc) I have Nvidia, Adobe, and Foxit folders in mine.

            [b<]NONE OF THAT STUFF SHOULD EVER BE IN THE USER ROOT/HOME FOLDER OR PERSONAL FOLDERS. THERE IS A DEDICATED APPDATA FOLDER SOLELY AND EXCLUSIVELY FOR THIS PURPOSE.[/b<] The poor behavior of practically every windows software developer and Microsoft's vague stance and wishy-washy application permissions mean that the user folders are not a filing system for users, but an abyssal dumping ground for application data that lazy developers know that their application will always have write access to for the user the application is being run as. My users root folder and documents folders are already littered with stuff that doesn't belong here and I installed the 1809 from scratch less than a week ago. This is just the tip of the iceberg though; What really irks me is the sheer quantity of rubbish developers add to the registry. There's stuff in there that could turn any man into [i<]Falling Down[/i<]'s Michael Douglas.

            • DarkUltra
            • 11 months ago

            And it gets worse. The new Windows 10 “Time Machine” backup tool only backs up your files, and not the email and settings uou have stored in the AppData folder. So what did Microsoft do? They moved the Outlook email to My Documents. Utterly unbelievably. What about Thunderbird and other applications wchich store their settings and email in AppData?

            I still use My Documents as my documents folder, but I recommend everyone to use Second Copy or other means of backup solution.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            Edit: I’ll simplify this.

            Please, stop hurting yourself.

            You’re essentially asking developers to stop developing multi-user applications with per user settings that don’t require Admin rights. You want Microsoft and the Linux Foundation to invent impossible magic that will punish developers who violate their FHS rules.

            I’ll chalk this one up as a first. First TR reader to ask for a magic solution that prevents user input in the user writable directory.

            • Redocbew
            • 11 months ago

            I think that means “yes”.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            Yes, he is punching himself.

            • Redocbew
            • 11 months ago

            Chill, bro.

            You’ll have plenty of chances to defend your opinion of what an OS should be in the future.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            Why are you getting involved in this? How did Chrispy phrase it?

            Are you just derailing a thread here to pick a fight?

            • Redocbew
            • 11 months ago

            Seems like it’s been derailed already, and since it’s 3:30AM here what else am I going to do?

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            Derailed depends on a point of view. This is still about the user/documents directory.

            As for the time, sure why not pass the time on the graveyard shift with some good old fashion pedantic pragmatism.

            • Redocbew
            • 11 months ago

            The funny thing is I really would be interested in hearing the reasons why someone would be a fan of Windows from design point of view, but it’s a difficult thing to find. I don’t get it, and it’s not what I use on a daily basis, but every system has its strong and weak points. It always seems like there’s no shortage of pitched battles between camps and very little useful comparisons between them.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            Speaking strictly to this subject, a *nix user should feel relatively comfortable with the Windows /home structure.

            /home/<username>
            versus
            c:\user\<username>

            There are only a few prominent differences, none of which are earth shattering.

            Per user application data in *nix use a .<application name> structure. You can do that in Windows, but the expectation is to go into appdata\local or appdata\roaming. Being a user writable location allows for developers that can defy expectations. OSS applications like Putty are just one example of a developer who doesn’t use appdata. Putty creates a .rnd in the root of home and leverages HKCU (registry) is used to store SSH keys and profiles.

            That roaming folder is a unique oddity, tied to the fact that Windows sees more local usage than remote terminal usage. Finding application data inside roaming just means better compatibility in a Windows Domain environment with non-exclusive machine access (roaming profiles).

            One other prominent difference that sticks out is that each user has their own temp directory. This is a better security solution and amorilerates the need for the +t sticky bit, but has a downside of being an additional clutter point (as temp directories are).

            Application settings or output in Linux that need to be global go into /etc, /usr, or /var. Windows uses C:\ProgramData and various C:\Windows subdirectories for this.

            The registry is also an option if, as a developer, you want per user or global settings support without the need to create files on the disk. It can also allow for centrally controlled application settings via GPO.There’s not really a Linux analog for this and I suspect the Linux community sees it as superfluous. It’s a key part of GPO management in Windows in the enterprise, so it’s not going anywhere.

            Edit: Clarifications via additional details.

            • meerkt
            • 11 months ago

            I don’t have a problem with the theoretical idea, and it’s not about multiuser or permissions levels. It’s about what it turned out to be in actuality. I try to keep my own files organized and it’s difficult as it is. No need for an extra unruly mess that’s out of my control and intermingles with my files.

            I could think of future APIs and standards that might help.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 11 months ago

            That will just generate more mess, not less. Developers aren’t following the “rules” now, why will more rules change things?

            [url<]https://xkcd.com/927/[/url<] Microsoft and the Linux Foundation have no power over developers. If a given application decides to do something in a user writable location that you don’t like, there is no 1st party fix for that. There is a third party fix though. You as the consumer complaining about the behavior or using a different application that behaves like you want. The OSS program xnview is a good example of this. It allows total control over whether you want a global profile or file based per user profile or per user registry based profile. If I remember right it even allows you to define the path and name. Putty on the other hand puts files into the users home directory root without asking. You want Microsoft to punish Putty? How do you think the community would perceive that? You know the answer and it involves death to M$ howls across the web. Platforms like UWP give Microsoft lots of control to make a developer behave, but I suspect most users here recoil at that idea. So all that remains is a magical solution that can read your mind about writing into the user directory. It definitely just magically knows that you didn’t want that folder in documents created and moves it without creating any application breakage or support nightmares. What additional wish from the monkeys paw do we desire today?

            • meerkt
            • 11 months ago

            No need to punish or force devs.

            Introduce a new standard+API that is clear, and with attractive features. Developers will want to use it because of its merits and because users favor it. NewAPI apps will get a dedicated root (could be under %homepath%) with its own logic.

            While at it, also portable apps can be made standardized thru OS-level support and Microsoft guidelines.

            BTW, Microsoft does have power over developers. For example UAC, that did nudge developers in a certain direction. Although sometimes the results can be unpredictable, like apps that run their EXEs from under %appdata%.

      • NovusBogus
      • 11 months ago

      I don’t mind Desktop, Documents, and maybe Downloads, and wish the other stuff would be consolidated under Documents. AppData is a total dumpster fire and needs to go, though. ProgramData should probably go as well, though it’s less of an offender and things in there typically belong.

    • Shouefref
    • 11 months ago

    I have read somewhere that there is a problem if your hd (or ssd) is too small. What exactly happens, I don’t remember. Maybe the two problems are linked.

    “Microsoft: Upcoming Windows Update Might Fail If Your Hard Drive is Too Full”

    This is the link:
    [url<]https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/microsoft-upcoming-windows-update-might-fail-if-your-hard-drive-is-too-full/amp/[/url<]

      • Pwnstar
      • 11 months ago

      Yes, you need free space to create Windows.old.

      This isn’t a new requirement.

    • tay
    • 11 months ago

    Lots of users on Ars Technica reporting that they lost data. Good thing they fired all testers before they moved on to software as a service.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 11 months ago

      Obviously, they don’t need testers. They have their paying customers to test their software for them!

        • GrimDanfango
        • 11 months ago

        Most of their users aren’t paying customers. They’re receivers of a generous free upgrade. They should probably expect to be treated like testers I guess.

        Their paying customers are the ones who they send all the personal data to.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 11 months ago

          What? Is this your blog post?

          • Pwnstar
          • 11 months ago

          The upgrade may have been “free” but you still had to have bought Windows to get a free upgrade.

          • just brew it!
          • 11 months ago

          [quote<]Most of their users aren't paying customers. They're receivers of a generous free upgrade. They should probably expect to be treated like testers I guess.[/quote<] Sounds just like most Linux desktop distros, minus the availability of source code. 😉

      • usernam3
      • 11 months ago

      WAAS – it’ll generate some support calls so definitely they’ll be able to sell some services. Everything checks.

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