Nvidia RTX lands on gaming laptops

Nvidia rolled out its midrange RTX 2060 Turing-based graphics cards, fleshing out its desktop card family tree, and the company is also turning its attention to the gaming laptop sector. By the end of the month, you’ll have more than 40 RTX-equipped laptop models to choose from in more than 100 configuration combinations.

They’ll include a full complement of RTX 2080, RTX 2070, and RTX 2060 GPUs, and they’ll include the key Turing technologies, so you can expect real-time ray tracing and Deep Learning Super Sampling. These mobile versions also support WhisperMode, which reduces the cooling system’s sound levels by intelligently pacing the frame rate of your game to maximize power efficiency while your laptop is plugged in. It also includes Nvidia Battery Boost, which helps extend battery life while gaming on the go.

Nvidia is also promoting the Turing-equipped laptops for content creators. Nvidia said that RTX graphics cards could process 6K RAW video in real time, which means you can use an RTX-equipped laptop to get serious work done.

The mobile versions of Nvidia’s RTX GPUs aren’t quite as powerful as their desktop counterparts. They’re configured with lower base clock and boost clock ratings, but they do have the same amount of memory, and the same memory bandwidth.

GeForce RTX 2080 GeForce RTX 2070 GeForce RTX 2060
CUDA Cores 2944 2304 1920
RTX-OPS 37-53 T 31-38 T 26 T
Giga Rays/s 5 to 7 4 to 5 3.5
Boost Clock (MHz) 1095-1590 1185-1440 1200
Base Clock (MHz) 735-1380 885-1215 960
Power Requirements 80-150+ W 80-115 W 80-90 W
Memory Speed Up to 14 Gbps Up to 14 Gbps Up to 14 Gbps
Memory Capacity 8 GB GDDR6 8 GB GDDR6 6 GB GDDR6
Memory Interface 256-bit 256-bit 192-bit
Memory Bandwidth 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 336 GB/s

Of those 40+ new laptops, 17 will be Max-Q designs. Nvidia’s Max-Q program enables thin and light laptop designs that carry powerful graphics cards inside by targeting “peak efficiency” of the GPU. It first launched at Computex 2017 with a raft of sleek-looking machines, but there were only a handful, so the presence of so many options this time around bodes well for gamers hungry for a powerful (but not thick) machine.

Nvidia’s GeForce RTX laptop GPUs will be available starting January 29 from a wide variety of OEMs. Brands such as Asus, Dell, Gigabyte, HP, Lenovo, MSI, Razer, and Samsung will have laptop configurations available, as will system builders such as Origin PC, CyberPower PC, and Maingear.

Nvidia didn’t announce pricing for the RTX-equipped laptops, as each OEM will offer different configurations and price points. However, the company revealed that for a limited time, all GeForce RTX 2080-powered laptops would include a license key for Battlefield V and Anthem. Laptops with GeForce RTX 2070 or RTX 2060 GPUs include a license for one of those titles, at your discretion.

Comments closed
    • tfp
    • 7 months ago

    From what height was it dropped from? Did you find that plastic or metal shelled laptops held out better?

    • ronch
    • 7 months ago

    Seriously thinking about getting an affordable gaming laptop these days. I don’t think I should wait for RTX-powered laptops to become affordable. Or should I?

    Anyway It’s either the Acer Nitro 5 or Dell G3. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 8 months ago

    Do these still work with…what was it called, continuum? Oh yeah, Optimus.

      • Pwnstar
      • 8 months ago

      Optimus doesn’t work with Gsync.

      • MileageMayVary
      • 8 months ago

      AMD really missed a chance here to call a counter technology Megatron.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 months ago

    Whoa, news post from the past. Last summer was not Computex 2017. πŸ˜†

      • Pwnstar
      • 8 months ago

      lol

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 months ago

    Nothing lower than 80W, so no thanks.

    Power consumption is key for laptops, otherwise you have an 8lbs plastic chassis and 5lbs power brick to go with it, or you have a slimmed-down laptop with unbearably noisy fans.

      • chΒ΅ck
      • 8 months ago

      i’ve used a laptop exclusively for work and play since 2009. i keep a power brick at home and at work and 98% of it’s duty is as a DTR.
      having a nice GPU in a 15″ form factor is a godsend for people like me

        • Chrispy_
        • 8 months ago

        Heh, you could just buy two desktops with a hot-swap hard drive caddy, right? πŸ™‚

        I’m sure there are plenty of people happy to lug around a huge 17″ laptop bag that weighs as much as my bike, but I don’t even consider 15″ laptops anymore and based on what store shelves are filled with, anything larger than 14″ is an endangered species these days πŸ™

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 7 months ago

          No numpad = no sale for me.

      • TravelMug
      • 8 months ago

      Doesn’t look like you are up to date with what’s available. The MSI GS65 is 4.14lbs and the Aero 15X v8 is 4.49lbs. Both have the GF 1070 Max-Q in them with 90W TDP. They work fine. There is also the Razer 15 with 4.63lbs for the 2070/2080 models. None of them have crappy plastic chassis and all are thin and light. Maybe you should check those out, I presume the weight will be the same for the upgraded MSI and Aero, same as it is with the Razer. The power blick for these is usually around a 1.2-1.5lbs. Here’s a nice comparison:

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfWf3ZQZXwk[/url<]

        • Chrispy_
        • 8 months ago

        Yeah, I have personal experience with the Aero 15X. It’s way too thin for its TDP and the cooling simply can’t cope. Not only that, the fans ramp up to 100% under most gaming loads.

        [url=http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/tuning-the-aero-15-w-x-v7-v8-common-problems-solutions.816143/<]Here's a massive 280 page thread of complaints[/url<], many of which are about the inadequate cooling, thermal throttling, high fan speeds, and uncomfortably hot areas on the laptop. As I said, 'either 8lbs, [b<]or unbearably noisy[/b<]'; You haven't changed my opinion just yet πŸ˜‰

          • TravelMug
          • 7 months ago

          [quote<]Yeah, I have personal experience with the Aero 15X.[/quote<] Me too πŸ™‚ The problem is you've described all of the thin ones and it has nothing to do with the GPU. The issue are the 8th gen i7 CPUs in those devices. Unfortunately for the Aero there is limited way to deal with it, but on the GS65 you can unlock the BIOS and then use that or XTU or Throttlestop to limit the multipliers on the i7-8750H. You drop down 2-3 steps, combine it with undervolting and results in much more civilized fan noise under gaming load. The biggest problems with the Aero 15X is the abysmal software support from Gigabyte. The cooling is actually one of the better ones in that category.

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 months ago

            There’s simply a lack of cool/quiet/decent portable gaming laptops.

            A 1050Ti MaxQ is about the fastest 14″-class you can get without some kind of throttling/noise/thermal issue – and a 1050Ti isn’t really a huge upgrade over 2014’s 960m which consumed a similar ~60W or so.

            I feel that after four and half years, it’s high-time Nvidia addressed the obvious gap in the market between their 10W ID12 variant of the MX150 and the chips needing well in excess of 50W.

            • TravelMug
            • 7 months ago

            The GS65 has a bit better cooling than the Aero 15X and it seems the upgraded ones will improve on that more:

            [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hq1jDtaCIY[/url<] From 2:28 onwards. I think that upgraded version with the 80W 2060 should be a good solution.

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 months ago

            Notebookcheck has a review of the GS65 that says it’s marginally quieter than the Aero 15X, although the fan noise is irritatingly high-pitched because there are three tiny fans instead of two larger ones.

            It’s also [i<]shockingly expensive[/i<] and still larger than 14", still has a 2lbs power brick making it a total of 6lbs and the lightweight aluminium chassis reportedly creaks, flexes and feels pretty flimsy. My last MSI laptop was over five years ago, but the screen hinges failed from fatigue cracks. It's certainly pointing towards something that's trying to cram too much into too little. Imma give them A+ for effort, but honestly my original gripe still isn't settled. There's a lack of light, lower-power laptops that aren't difficult/noisy to cool in a 14" or smaller size with modest 25-50W GPUs in them.

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