Nvidia expands G-Sync to encompass Adaptive Sync displays

Along with its other announcements at CES 2019, Nvidia also announced some updates to G-Sync. One of those updates is G-Sync Ultimate, a new premium tier of G-Sync displays similar to the previously-announced G-Sync HDR. Most likely the more interesting news, though, is that Nvidia is finally going to be offering some support for VESA Adaptive Sync displays.

Both AMD and Nvidia would probably prefer this to not be so public, but AMD's FreeSync is essentially just a brand applied over the free and open VESA Adaptive Sync standard. VESA Adaptive Sync is a technology that allows displays to update at a variable refresh rate (VRR for short). You can read more about it here if you'd like a refresher. Today's announcement isn't exactly "yes, we now support FreeSync", but it's functionally similar.

Nvidia has always maintained that G-Sync is a premium product that provides a premium experience. To that end, the company states that "the [VESA] VRR gaming experience can vary widely." The company says it is testing monitors with support for VESA Adaptive Sync; it claims to have already tested over 400 displays. Monitors that the green giant finds to provide an acceptable experience will be certified as "G-Sync Compatible." The GeForce driver will then automatically identify these displays and enable VRR on them.

Don't fret if your monitor isn't on the extremely short list above. The company says that gamers with monitors the company hasn't tested, "or that have failed validation," will be able to manually enable VESA Adaptive Sync. Nvidia didn't make it clear if this has any practical differences from the automatically enabled mode above, but we expect the actual difference will depend on the display in question. You can check the list of G-Sync displays—including "G-Sync Compatible" displays—on Nvidia's page here.

Meanwhile, folks with demanding tastes and deep pockets are getting another option: G-Sync Ultimate. The new standard comes along with a revised G-Sync processor and mandates the display to reproduce most of the DCI-P3 colorspace, as well as to use a 1000 cd/m² "full-matrix" backlight to display it. Ultimately (heh) it sounds a lot like G-Sync HDR to us, but given that Nvidia is still talking about that standard in the same blog post, they are apparently not one and the same.

If you're itching to enable VESA Adaptive Sync on your GeForce graphics card, you don't have too long to wait. Nvidia says the feature will be coming along with the first Game Ready graphics driver release of the year, on January 15. On the other hand, if you'd like to order up 65" of G-Sync HDR "Big Format Gaming Display", the first one is available for pre-order now.

Comments closed
    • NovusBogus
    • 9 months ago

    Definitely a big step in the right direction. Assuming they don’t do something dumb like lock this feature to Turing SKUs the biggest winners will be those with mid-range Pascal and Maxwell cards, as VRR has always offered the greatest functional benefits at lower frame rates.

    This might also go a ways toward making the RTX feature meaningful.

      • xrror
      • 9 months ago

      It’s nVidia. Be happy they’re allowing Pascal to have this feature. Maxwell apparently isn’t getting it.

      Can’t have those cheap-o’s still sandbagging on GTX 980+ not upgrading can we?

      And if you say something about it being a silicon limitation, please envision my boot in your mouth as a preemptive deterrent.

    • albundy
    • 9 months ago

    good to hear that they are giving us a break on VRR. i guess monitor manufacturers were having a hard time selling gsync screens when there were much better options under freesync.

    but that ugly looking tv though…who designed this mess? i hope its only 2 customers let us know if its any good, cuz my G’s are going towards a MicroLED TV 85″ beast.

    • DPete27
    • 9 months ago

    Great news, but as long as Navi isn’t a total turd, I’ll be buying AMD later this year for my upgrade. Having used my RX480 for the past couple years after coming from a GTX660, I like AMDs driver/software much better than Nvidia.

    Also not surprised about this after news of their stock.

    Also not surprised that Nvidia would still bend the truth and throw in one last jab that GSync is better….

    • GrimDanfango
    • 9 months ago

    I honestly wondered whether nVidia would cling to exclusive proprietary VRR tech and willfully avoid supporting updated standards until its dying breath.
    I certainly didn’t expect them to fold this soon.

    Splendid news!

    (I’m very happy with my existing LG G-Sync VA, but I look forward to more options being available when I maybe upgrade to an OLED in 5 years time…)

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 months ago

    So when is Nvidia going to get to the D’s? I have a Dell S2418HN, although the limited FreeSync range of 48-75 is probably going to get it passed over.

      • cygnus1
      • 9 months ago

      who cares, just enable it and enjoy it for what it *can* do

        • RAGEPRO
        • 9 months ago

        Indeed, perhaps I wasn’t clear enough stating that you will supposedly be able to enable VRR on [i<]any[/i<] VRR-capable display.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 9 months ago

          I was trying to make a joke about how all these monitors are made by companies that start with A an B and was wondering when they’d get through the rest of the alphabet. I’ll try to be more concise and clear next time.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 9 months ago

      Nvidia is always giving us the D instead.

    • Theolendras
    • 9 months ago

    The timing seem is ok I guess, that way you do not appear to be behind Intel IGP upcoming iGPU, that would have kinda support that kind of setup anyway.

    Cool, I guess can now seriously consider RTX for my next GPU unless Navi really undercut the value proposition of Nvidia.

    • MrDweezil
    • 9 months ago

    With today’s news, TR needs to publish and updated guide on what monitors are worth buying.

    • cynan
    • 9 months ago

    Companies who recently released/announced non “ultimate” class G-sync monitors: “Doh!”

    • K-L-Waster
    • 9 months ago

    The 12 supported monitors aren’t the most inspiring bunch. 10 of them are TN panels.

      • bfar
      • 9 months ago

      There are a lot of Freesync displays out there with very narrow adaptive sync ranges or overdrive issues. I guess it’s prudent not to make too many promises.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 9 months ago

        Agreed — it’s just it would be nice if some of the supported monitors were ones that, y’know, someone might actually want….

          • bfar
          • 9 months ago

          I’d certainly be one of them – I have an Acer XF270HU – the IPS version of the listed XG270HU. If it works unofficially I’d still be happy.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 9 months ago

            If that model was officially supported it would be the most attractive of the lot by a pretty wide margin. (Hope it ends up working…)

            • BigTed
            • 9 months ago

            I have that monitor paired with a 1080ti, so I’ll be quite excited to see VRR for the first time. It’s nice to get ‘free’ stuff!

      • Kretschmer
      • 9 months ago

      I believe that Nvidia is requiring a hefty difference between top and bottom VRR to certify, which disqualifies a great number of FreeSync displays.

      Non-whitelisted monitors will likely work, just not to the level of responsiveness that NVidia demands.

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        Nvidia’s certification list is basically “here are Freesync units on the market that match G-Sync spec we put out and we have done in-house testing to verify this”.

      • jessterman21
      • 9 months ago

      True, but all are 144Hz and up, and 2 of them are available on Amazon for $199.

      Still rocking my old GTX 960, and I’ve been resisting upgrading to VRR monitor because I’ll have to spend $300+ for a new AMD card + FreeSync monitor. (3 kids, money’s tight y’all)

    • Bauxite
    • 9 months ago

    Nvidias overpriced (supposedly like $400 for the 4k one, yet I don’t see anything close to a 1080 card inside there) gsync modules were about to hold the high end back, they don’t even support the max DP bandwidth.

    • psuedonymous
    • 9 months ago

    How HDR is handled is going to be interesting:
    The route AMD went was to keep requiring as little as possible of the panel controller manufacturers (as from all evidence they are willing to only [i<]do[/i<] as little as possible) and as much as possible is done on the GPU, with that requiring games to implement a proprietary API for HDR support. Nvidia continued with their 'input agnostic' method for G-Sync 'Ultimate' (nee G-Sync HDR), with the work of HDR processing (and backlight driving, non-trivial with FALD and variable refresh intervals) done on the panel controller and the GPU treating displays equally. That hits an impasse when it comes to 'A-sync' HDR monitors: the monitor is expecting the GPU to do all the work, the GPU is expecting the monitor to do the work. It's slightly moot as there are zero whatsoever monitors supporting HDR and VRR with FALD backlights as there are zero panel controllers that support that: it's the G-Sync FPGA module or nothing. Depending on how early Nvidia started working on this, they may have horse-traded their way into getting panel controller manufacturers to put the work in for proper VRR FALD driving in the controllers, or we may end up in the same situation as for the HDR monitors: Nvidia cards working with monitors with G-sync modules, AMD cards working with Freesync HDR monitors (and games that implement their APIs), and never the twain shall meet.

      • cygnus1
      • 9 months ago

      Assuming nVidia gets panel controllers doing the HDR work in any appreciable volume of parts, I’m sure AMD can update their driver to support it too. For a price that is, because I’m also sure nVidia wouldn’t give that to them for free, until or if it ever became an open standard.

        • psuedonymous
        • 9 months ago

        Or AMD just quietly brushes the “you need to implement our API” bit under the rug, along with the handful of kinda-sorta-HDR (no FALD backlights here) Freesync 2 monitors, and just hopes nobody notices. Worked for Mantle!

          • cygnus1
          • 9 months ago

          [quote<] Worked for Mantle! [/quote<] Lol, I had almost forgot about Mantle, good point!

          • LostCat
          • 9 months ago

          Samsungs higher end TVs have both Freesync 2 and FALD as I recall.

            • psuedonymous
            • 9 months ago

            They are also… kind of meh implementations. At UHD you get 48-60Hz, and Samsung themselves caution that VRR will cause perceptual brightness changes as refresh rate changes (in the initial implementation it just clamped the backlight at a constant lower level and turned the FALD into an expensive single-level backlight). They are also Freesync ‘1’ rather than Freesync 2, so HDR support is in “just fiddle with the Windows colour settings, drive colour settings, application colour settings and TV colour settings and it might work, you’re on your own” territory.

            • LostCat
            • 9 months ago

            I guess I don’t know. I’m waiting for the 2019 models to show up as I need eARC.

    • YukaKun
    • 9 months ago

    That “G-Sync compatible monitors” is really interesting. I’m absolutely reading between the lines here and I can read “it’s not Freesync, but G-Sync you’ll have here”. They won’t even call it “VRR” like they should (based on the VESA terminology), so in a very nVidia move, they’re hiding the details to regular consumers behind marketing terminology.

    Well, at least it’s progress?

    Cheers!

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      They are changing the brand around.

      G-Sync 1.0 is being put out to pasture. I suspect Nvidia will quietly discontinue it since the middleware is completely obsolete with a GPU with proper Displayport 1.2 or newer support. The only victims are Kepler-era G-Sync users. They’ll instead replace it with “G-Sync Ultimate” as the premium experience requiring certain items to get the tag on monitors (HDR space, certain HZ range (Probably [40-144Hz range minimal], ULBM etc.) G-Sync brand will be “downgraded” to Nvidia’s implementation of VESA’S VRR spec.

      • PixelArmy
      • 9 months ago

      And “FreeSync” is not a marketing moniker?

    • bfar
    • 9 months ago

    The reality is that their proprietary hardware solution was a problem the moment that a cheaper Vesa standard emerged. However Nvidia’s market position has allowed them to run with it for years. Now there’s a major stock overhang, and they simply need to give people more reasons to buy their products.

    Whatever the reasosn, I for one am delighted with the news 🙂

    • chuckula
    • 9 months ago

    AMD fanboys: We Won!!!

    AMD executives: Sheiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii*.

      • cygnus1
      • 9 months ago

      Lol, exactly what I was thinking!

        • cygnus1
        • 9 months ago

        AMD execs will really crap themselves when monitor manufacturers start dropping the FreeSync branding or at least also make VESA Adapative Sync (or even G-Sync Compatible) just as prominent.

        bahahahaha

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          Adaptive Sync branding will take over both camps. Nvidia will simply move its G-Sync branding to “G-Sync Ultimate” for the premium experience.

            • maxxcool
            • 9 months ago

            ^ yup. And the ‘gotta have it’ ‘e sport’ ‘serious gamer’ crowds will buy them in droves.

      • Sahrin
      • 9 months ago

      …if they’re supporting something that harms AMD but benefits consumers as a whole, aren’t they by definition not AMD fanboys?

      • kvndoom
      • 9 months ago

      You invoke Clay Davis, you get Clay Davis.

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr0A7TofowE[/url<]

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 months ago

    Hell hath frozen over.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      Almost freezing but not quite there yet. Nvidia has to open-up several of their proprietary stuff for that to happen.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 9 months ago

        G-Sync: check

        Phy-X: check

        Hairworks: anyone care?

        What else?

          • Captain Ned
          • 9 months ago

          Dawn MK 3?

        • Chrispy_
        • 9 months ago

        Well, 12 out of 400 monitors certified means that their early-stage VESA VRR driver needs [i<]a lot[/i<] of work! There are hundreds of Freesync monitors that work without flickering/blanking/artifacts, yet early Freesync drivers suffered from these problems in the beginning (5 years ago, LOL). AMD have a 5 year headstart on getting Freesync working well on a huge range of refresh rates and capabilities. Nvidia are probably starting from square one, having arrogantly assumed that people would pay $200 for the technology and only bothered coding for their G-Sync module or a miniscule number of hand-picked panels for laptops. Ah, I used the words "arrogant Nvidia" and earned myself some downvotes. I'm glad to see there are still Nvidia fanboys that I can offend in 2019. Fight the good fight guys, Nvidia (shareholders) need your (financial) support!

          • chuckula
          • 9 months ago

          You started off with the unfounded assumption that every freesync monitor out there is perfect and that Nvidia is too dumb to support what — according to AMD fanboys — is a trivially easy extension to VESA.

          Or… There are plenty of “freesync” monitors out there that have a sticker but don’t actually do what they promise to do 100%.

            • Chrispy_
            • 9 months ago

            You started out with the unfounded assumption that I meant every freesync monitor. I said hundreds. There are also a decent number of freesync monitors that just suck, outright and I’m not denying that. Your assumption is that I think all Freesync monitors are perfect, which is exactly that, an incorrect assumption.

            Don’t assume.

          • ColeLT1
          • 9 months ago

          “Means that their early-stage VESA VRR driver needs a lot of work!”

          They have had VESA VVR since 2015, used for mobile gsync. Nothing wrong with the driver, just very few freesync displays have the wide refresh range that nvidia is requiring for the certification stamp, the narrow range displays still work, you just wont get the stamp of approval.

            • Chrispy_
            • 9 months ago

            No, it’s not about the wide refresh range.

            Nvidia specifically listed in their slides that a ‘validated’ display is tested for flicker/blanking/artifacts. You’re thinking of certified which means it has tougher requirements, including refresh ranges.

    • Krogoth
    • 9 months ago

    I suspect that RTX’s lackluster uptake and the need to clear out old inventory played a massive role in this. They don’t want to be jumped by Navi in a price war.

      • Chz
      • 9 months ago

      I think everyone knew they’d offer up VESA async support the moment the market dictated that they had to. This is rather sooner than I expected – I thought they’d wait until AMD was ready to launch – but it’s always been coming.

        • bfar
        • 9 months ago

        I wonder what other goodies are in the pipe? Price drops? A powerful mid range product (aka 8800GT)? A competative AMD product? This move suggests Nvidia are ready to face the current market a bit more seriously.

        • BurntMyBacon
        • 9 months ago

        [quote=”Chz”<]This is rather sooner than I expected ...[/quote<] Yeah. It's almost 3 months until April Fools Day. Way to jump the gun guys. ......... Wait. This isn't a joke?!? (o_O)

        • jts888
        • 9 months ago

        This might feel sooner than expected looking at FreeSync alone as a competitor, but in light of HDMI 2.1 with VRR, Nvidia’s matching their announcement with the launch of VRR TVs seems almost unavoidable. People have been speculating about HDMI VRR being the inevitable death of G-sync for quite a while now.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 9 months ago

    It’s about darned time!

      • MrDweezil
      • 9 months ago

      I last bought a monitor in 2012 and have refused to upgrade until I could do so without being tied to one GPU vendor, so this is great news for me.

    • Topinio
    • 9 months ago

    “but AMD’s FreeSync is essentially just a brand applied over the free and open VESA Adaptive Sync standard”

    is opposite to

    “it’s clear VESA’s effort and AMD’s Project FreeSync are not to be confused”

    from
    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/26451/adaptive-sync-added-to-displayport-spec[/url<] which is wrong?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 9 months ago

      Well certainly I have all respect for Scott, but that was written 5 years ago. I have no doubt AMD’s intentions for FreeSync were grander than what they have become but for whatever reason the reality is what I wrote in today’s piece. I guess you could get real pedantic and point out that FreeSync also works over HDMI and ultimately is a broader technology than VESA Adaptive Sync but I don’t think the distinction is really meaningful.

      • superjawes
      • 9 months ago

      Probably the quote from 2019. AMD never required anything groundbreaking from a monitor to support FreeSync, and it really sounds like the name itself was a dig at Nvidia’s branded alternative. Then they just needed to program the switches to enable asynchronous refreshes.

      Although we could possibly ask Scott if he can clarify. Let’s try summoning him.

      Damage Damage Damage

        • cynan
        • 9 months ago

        Given the name, you’d think you’d have to incant it 4 times for it to work…

          • RAGEPRO
          • 9 months ago

          [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hU3YdKa_OJs<]That's a lotta damage![/url<]

          • Chrispy_
          • 9 months ago

          Amusingly, the quad damage powerup in Quake 3 Arena was only actually a 3x damage multiplier.

            • jihadjoe
            • 9 months ago

            That’s a lot like how 486DX4 processors were only really an x3 multiplier!

      • cygnus1
      • 9 months ago

      I would say both. Project FreeSync is probably also what led to FreeSync 2/HDR which is definitely not just a brand over the VESA standard.

      • jts888
      • 9 months ago

      The latter might be a slight overemphasized opinion, but the former is easier to pick on technically.

      VESA Adaptive-sync is just a wire-level protocol modification that specifies how a display advertises an optional capacity to receive frames with a variable preceding blanking window. FreeSync is not just branding over compatible monitors, but also the GPU driver stack and hardware enhancements (additional interrupt timers etc. in the display output blocks I think) needed for applications to actually meaningfully use the displays.

      Traditional graphics stacks just lacked any means of having software-initiated screen refreshes, and even if it is a relatively minor enhancement, AMD is trying to emphasize that FreeSync actually needed updated hardware to work and not just a driver tweak on any old GPU.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 9 months ago

      Neither. Freesync is a software implementation of any features not directly included in adaptive sync, like LFC/HDR processing, and is also a brand applied to adaptive sync for the purposes of AMD cards who were the original supporters of the technology.

      This is why Nvidia is having issues “supporting” adaptive monitors. They have not implemented any of those software features, and as such suffer from ALL of the initial problems they “exposed” from the initial implementation of freesync.

      So Nvidia is now going to have to backport some gsync features over to the driver side for VESA adaptive to be fully supported, but the top tier adaptive monitors don’t really need it, thus the limited and easy certification for those panels.

      Nvidia, and their consumers, are falling prey to the original disinfo campaign against adaptive, which is why so few people understand it. That said, they don’t need to come clean about it, since nobody big will ever call them out, and they can just roll out the updates over time without any consequences. After all, they finally did do the right thing in supporting it, and nobody using certified monitors will notice a problem.

      Is this fair or informative to consumers who don’t have certified monitors? No, but now that adaptive is enabled, 3rd party software can step in to address all of the missing features. Or at least the possibility is there, until Nvidia themselves get around to it.

    • USAFTW
    • 9 months ago

    So AMD was lobbying Intel all along to support Free-sync, and NVIDIA got around to supporting it sooner? I wonder if Jeff’s article a while ago was in any way related to this. Perhaps that was an early driver-side implementation that wasn’t quite ready but slipped through?
    Looking forward to trying it out.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 9 months ago

      Yeah, seems strange. I wonder if there’s at least some hardware needed, though. When Intel had their tech day the next gen of their iGPU said it will support VRR/Adaptive Sync.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      Nvidia had supported VESA’s VRR spec on their mobile GPUs since Maxwell. That driver “glitch” was probably a flag not working correctly and thought it was working with a mobile GPU SKU.

      • jihadjoe
      • 9 months ago

      My guess is Intel was probably hoping to support it on their 10nm line but we all know what happened to that lol

      • NovusBogus
      • 9 months ago

      Oh, they’ve definitely been sitting on this one for a while so they have something to talk about when AMD presents a credible threat to one of the market segments. Like, say, a midrange card that’s not hobbled by losing a lot of valuable real estate to an experimental feature and might even be the first of the mythical 7nm unicorns.

    • Tristan
    • 9 months ago

    the question is how well they support FreeSync, if there won’t be intentional discourage by introducing ‘unavoidable issues’

      • psuedonymous
      • 9 months ago

      Whitelisted (certified) monitors enable adaptive sync automatically when connected, for everything else is a manual settings switch-flip.

    • Kretschmer
    • 9 months ago

    This is fantastic news for gamers and terrible news for AMD.

      • auxy
      • 9 months ago

      What if the real reason Jensen never launched Freesync support before now was as a politeness to AMD? (´・ω・`)

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        No, the real reason is because Nvidia wanted to setup a vertical monopoly a.k.a be Apple. The massive flaw in that strategy is that Nvidia didn’t manufacture its own brand of monitors. Monitor vendors didn’t want to play along with Nvidia as seen with the lack of G-Sync SKUs versus the massive flux of VESA’s VRR capable SKUs.

          • psuedonymous
          • 9 months ago

          Monitor manufactures have nothing to do with it, they are 100% reliant on panel control IC manufacturers.

          Nvidia had first mover advantage (and still do for new features) by creating their own panel controller – using FPGAs rather than fabbing an ASIC, due to volume – which was initially the only game in town. Only after eDP Panel Self Refresh was moved into the non-embedded DP spec and renamed DP Adaptive Sync (and branded as Freesync by AMD) was there something panel controller manufacturers could retrofit to their existing lineups as competition to Nvidia’s controllers. Because they were otherwise the same old bulk commodity panel controllers, cost was broadly the same as the same old ‘non freesync’ controllers, but the downside was that they still had broadly the same [i<]capabilities[/i<] as the same old controllers, hence the glut of monitors using those controllers with the "Freesync" tickbox checked but an almost unusable sync range (or just generally crap panels linked to those controllers).

          • NovusBogus
          • 9 months ago

          The bigger flaw is that unlike Apple, NV’s hype fu is not strong enough to dictate terms to the market. No PC company can, a lesson that Microsoft continually receives but never manages to learn.

      • euricog
      • 9 months ago

      Completely agree, as Freesync/A-Sync enabled monitor owners are no longer tied up to AMD, it’s a big market segment that nVidia can now capture with this move.

      Hoping that AMD can bring forward a kick-ass 7nm desktop GPU so that we can have much-needed competition on the market (you too Intel!).

      • superjawes
      • 9 months ago

      This doesn’t help AMD, but it’s not going to destroy them. FreeSync was always just a little worse than G-Sync (because G-Sync required a ton of other features that further improved the experience). The biggest effect of a split market was a relatively minor wall isolating people who bought different monitors.

      From here, AMD should probably just work to make more of those extra features available via VESA standards, OR they need to pair with someone like ASUS to make a few AMD equivalents to Nvidia’s premium options, just so Red Team Fans aren’t left in the cold.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 9 months ago

        Don’t let the AMD cult members see you claim FreeSync isn’t as good as GSync. The entire TR congregation down voted me when I spoke out.

          • euricog
          • 9 months ago

          If you put costs aside, yes, there’s no denying that technically G-Sync is better.

          But, as cost is a major part of any purchase, if one of those solutions gives me adaptive sync for a certain price and another gives me a tad slightly better adaptive sync with a very significant price increase, then logically I will get much more value for my money with FreeSync.

          Worse, you have to pay significantly more to have an equivalent G-Sync monitor and multiple blind tests have shown that a not insignificant amount of people can’t even notice the difference between both technologies.

          Even if money wasn’t a concern for me, VESA’s adaptive sync is an open standard that is not restricted to a specific company and may be adopted by anyone in the industry, such as was the case with Intel. This means a lot of added value to any consumer, unlike nVidia’s “all your money are belong to us” strategy.

            • rahulahl
            • 9 months ago

            Aside from the range, does Freesync work in windowed mode like G-Sync?
            I am asking because I haven’t kept up with the news and most of the games I am currently playing (Fortnite, Darksiders 3, MapleStory 2) right now are in borderless mode. Only CSGO is something I play in Full screen mode because it’s just too choppy in borderless.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 9 months ago

            Yes and no. “Freesync” does work in borderless, but it is a software implementation built over a hardware feature, meaning that if Nvidia does not support it in software, it will not work on their hardware.

            AFAIK, Nvidia has merely turned on hardware adaptive support, while currently supporting nothing from “Freesync”. It will not perform the same, until Nvidia supports the software side as well, albeit under the “gsync” brand for the software.

            This is why so few monitors are “certified” for Nvidia’s adaptive. Those are the only monitors Nvidia knows work without needing any driver side features. Which also says nothing about borderless, which is likely not yet, unless they already had it working on mobile, and that was ported over.

            Every FUD point that Nvidia ever spread about adaptive, applies to them right now. They don’t support the software side of adaptive yet, and as such must be dealt with in the same way AMD did.

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        Freesync and G-Sync provide the same thing if both monitors are equal. The only difference is that G-Sync 1.0 required certain items in the panel in order to get the middleware chip implementation. This gave the perception that G-Sync in itself is superior.

        • Kretschmer
        • 9 months ago

        It’s not going to destroy AMD, but Nvidia GPUs just got more attractive (broader selection of gaming monitors at a lower price). I know a bunch of people who never got into VRR due to GSync’s premium who can now get the feature without switching platforms.

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          VRR is the best thing that happened to the gaming industry since pixel/vertex shading. It addresses so many of the issues with screen tearing and motion shuttering that has plagued computer monitors since the beginning. Vsync was just a band-aid meant to work with CRTs not LCD monitors.

          Once you have experienced a decent VRR setup. You just cannot go back.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      Yep, there is now almost no reason to get an AMD RTG performance GPU.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 9 months ago

      But wasn’t nVidia locking people into an nVidia VRR ecosystem bad for AMD before?

      Now people might get a G-Sync compatible monitor, and not feel bound to stick with nVidia next time they go for a GPU upgrade.

      It can’t really be bad both ways round. More flexibility in upgrade paths would presumably favour the underdog slightly if it favours anyone.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 months ago

        >Now people might get a G-Sync compatible monitor, and not feel bound to stick with nVidia next time they go for a GPU upgrade.

        The people who got a G-Sync monitor are stuck with nvidia, as AMD does not support G-Sync.

        The people who got a Freesync monitor are now free to choose between AMD and nvidia.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 9 months ago

          That’s only an option if AMD releases some GPUs that can do a better job. As much as I rib the AMD/FreeSync fan boys/girls, Nvidia is really looking out for them. The RTX 2060 just retired AMD’s compete lineup. They can save money on a RTX 2060 and get a decent GSync monitor to go with it.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 9 months ago

          Yes, that’s why I said “G-Sync compatible” (ie, Freesync) not “G-Sync”. That’s the specific term they use to describe them in this news post.

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