Asus shows off three high-end ROG Strix gaming monitors at CES 2019

Asus showed a whole bunch of cool stuff at CES, including new systems, parts, peripherals, and more. But today, we want to gush about the company's three new ROG displays. The XG438Q, XG49VQ, and XG32VQR are all large gaming monitors based around VA LCD panels that support AMD's Radeon Freesync 2 HDR standard.

Asus ROG Strix XG438Q

First up is the model that Asus is the most proud of, and rightfully so. The XG438Q is a massive 43" monitor with a 3840×2160 resolution. It supports a 120-Hz refresh rate, and Asus says the display can reproduce 90% of the DCI-P3 color space. Its powerful LED backlight supports local dimming and can shine at up to 600 cd/m² peak brightness, although Asus doesn't comment on the number of individual dimming zones. The company does say that the XG438Q is DisplayHDR 600-certified, though.

While Asus is careful to note that the XG438Q is not a TV, it has a couple of TV-like features. It has no less than four separate inputs—three HDMI and one DisplayPort—as well as picture-in-picture mode. There's also a pair of 10-W speakers built in that should sound a little better than your usual monitor audio. Still, the included GamePlus technology (allowing users to put crosshairs, timers, and other indicators on the screen) as well as the low-input-lag design set the XG438Q well apart from TVs.

We don't have quite as many details about the other two displays, but they also appear to be pretty impressive bits of kit. The XG49VQ is 49" from corner to corner, but it's smaller than that might otherwise imply because of its super-wide 32:9 aspect ratio. Its 3840×1080 VA LCD refreshes at up to 144 Hz, and it can purportedly reproduce 90% of the DCI-P3 color space just like its larger cousin above. However, its backlight "only" glows at 450 cd/m², limiting it to a DisplayHDR 400 cert.

The XG32VQR is a relatively modest display compared to the other two, but that's not saying much. It's still a 31.5" VA LCD with a 2560×1440 resolution that can refresh at up to 144Hz and reproduce 94% of the DCI-P3 color space. This monitor is DisplayHDR 400-compliant just like its double-wide sibling above. Both the XG49VQ and the XG32VQR have two HDMI ports and a single DisplayPort connection, and all three monitors have two-port USB 3.0 hubs built-in.

If you're after several square feet of display, you don't have too long to wait. Asus says the double-wide XG49VQ and the XG32VQR will be available later this month, while the 4K XG438Q should show up this spring. The company said it wasn't ready to reveal pricing.

Comments closed
    • jts888
    • 9 months ago

    I am not quite sold on the Strix XG438Q itself, but the big news here is that DP 1.3/1.4 scalers with adaptive sync support are finally being produced.

    43″ UHD@120 Hz is the form factor I want (preferably IPS but VA probably OK), and this display just means that a model I want might be months instead of years additional waiting.

      • Blytz
      • 9 months ago

      I wonder why they didn’t just go to 144hz ?

      I’m with you on the form factor, however, I’d be happy if it was 39-41″

        • jts888
        • 9 months ago

        DP 1.3/1.4 only has barely enough bandwidth for UHD@120 Hz w/ 24 bpp. 144 Hz UHD DP displays need link compression (don’t think anyone supports VESA DSC yet) or plain old chroma sub-sampling.

    • jeffcutsinger
    • 9 months ago

    Every time I see one of these articles, I ctrl+f oled. Every time, 0 results.

    I’m beginning to despair.

      • jts888
      • 9 months ago

      OLED does not yet have the stench of death on the name, but even casual consumers have a level of wariness around the technology regarding burn-in surpassing even the issue that ultimately doomed plasma.

      Even if blue pixel lifetimes have been improved (and I’m not even sure to what degree), a workstation monitor with any likelihood of displaying largely static GUI elements like toolbars is a really poor use case for any display tech with any level of burn-in.

      • Ifalna
      • 9 months ago

      OLED panels simply do not work as a computer monitor.
      I doubt that you will ever see one in the mainstream segment.

      Your best bet is waiting for µLED displays. Until then, us users of static images will have to put up with classic LCD limitations.

        • nizer
        • 9 months ago

        Well, Dell / Alienware seems to think otherwise cf this 55″ OLED gaming monitor (under development)
        [url<]https://www.anandtech.com/show/13845/dell-at-ces-2019-alienware-55inch-4k-120-hz-oled-gaming-monitor-showcased[/url<]

    • ptsant
    • 9 months ago

    A bit lost with the multiple HDR specifications. Which is the one to get? HDR600?

      • exilon
      • 9 months ago

      All the HDR certifications are a bit bullshit.

      HDR400 is basically a run of the mill monitor with a 400-nit capable backlight.

      The higher certifications require some level of local dimming to pass, but the contrast ratio tests are easily gamed.

      Check out these test patterns…
      [url<]https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/displayhdr-test/9nn1gpn70nf3?activetab=pivot:overviewtab[/url<]

      • RAGEPRO
      • 9 months ago

      Basically, the VESA DisplayHDR certs are like this:

      DisplayHDR 400 simply needs true 8-bit per channel processing from front to back, 320 cd/m² sustained full-screen brightness, 400 cd/m² peak brightness, and 95% sRGB. Not exactly “HDR” but basically it means it’s not a total garbage monitor.

      DisplayHDR 600 is proper HDR.
      [quote<]The peak luminance requirement is ratcheted up to 600 cd/m². Sustained bright scenes must be reproduced with at least 350 cd/m² of brightness. Black-to-white luminance response must be achieved in "eight frames" or less. Compliant monitors must cover 99% of [sRGB] and 90% of the DCI-P3 space at a minimum. Dim corner luminance of 0.10 cd/m² requires local dimming.[/quote<] DisplayHDR 1000 is a really nice display. It's the same as 600 but it requires a peak luminance of 1000 cd/m², sustained luminance of at least 600 cd/m², and a corner luminance requirement of 0.05 cd/m².

    • albundy
    • 9 months ago

    why dont they make tv sized monitors? i’d jump.

      • DPete27
      • 9 months ago

      Dude….my TV is “only” 40″

      • ptsant
      • 9 months ago

      Some TVs support FreeSync and low input lag modes. I believe the Samsung Q7FN series does that, but haven’t actually tested. You can definitely use it as a general purpose 4k monitor.

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 months ago

    Are they true 8-bit or 10-bit colour and DP 1.4a compliant?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 9 months ago

      All are true 10-bit color. I don’t know about the DP revision. Most of them have more HDMI ports than DP.

    • Pancake
    • 9 months ago

    ROG = Republic of Gerbils. Amirite? Amirite?

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 months ago

    Asus have a knack of picking good panels and tuning the firmware for things like pixel response and overdriver better than most of the competition.

    Unfortuantely they also have a knack of pricing those panels at a ridiculous premium, covering them in garish angluar plastic and ugly logos that make them hideous from the back, as well as adorning them with RGBLED distractions.

    I don’t want any of that tat and I’d wager that Asus could sell those panels for $100 less and still make as much profit if they just got rid of it all.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 months ago

      I’m surprised none of the mfrs have attempted to tackle that “grown up gamer” or “stealth professional” market: all the features, none of the bling.

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        It’ll probably be Samsung, Dell and HP now that VESA’s adaptive sync spec is available on both major platforms and they don’t have to commit themselves to Nvidia to get G-Sync 1.0 support.

        • rudimentary_lathe
        • 9 months ago

        Samsung’s styling is normally pretty conservative, and they have some VA monitors with a great feature set on paper. They seem to be a love-hate kind of product though given the reviews.

        • Chrispy_
        • 9 months ago

        I know, right?

        [quote<]"grown up gamer" or "stealth professional"[/quote<] Maybe I'm being dumb and missing something obvious, but aren't these the demographics with the largest quantity of disposable income to splurge on tech purchases?

          • Waco
          • 9 months ago

          One would imagine so. I honestly don’t understand what demographic is pushing the flashy crap.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 9 months ago

            If I could get a system where the fire breathing horsepower is hidden away and only thing you can see is the keyboard, mouse, and a high refresh rate HDR bezel-less monitor (ok, two of those last…) I’d never ask for anything else.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 9 months ago

        I have a Nixeus that just had a plain black bezel, so I think they have

      • rudimentary_lathe
      • 9 months ago

      Couldn’t agree more.

      • DarkUltra
      • 9 months ago

      Hi excuse me but the the asus rog swift pg279q has just bad pickings of IPS glow and backlight bleed:

      [url<]https://youtu.be/mje_fmayu0k[/url<] I still love mine.

    • Waco
    • 9 months ago

    Not having VESA mounts kills me. I have my current screen wall-mounted and there’s no way I’m going back.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 months ago

      Agreed. Even if I don’t want to mount them, I want to have the ability to do so. Especially if their stands are deficient in some way (and the look of stands in the pics make me question how adjustable they are). If anything, being able to attach an adjustable mount becomes more important as the screen size grows because “just sit it on something” becomes less and less viable and tilt starts to becomes more important.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 9 months ago

      The 34″ curved I just got you have to add a bracket to make it VESA mountable. These don’t have anything like that? Lame.

      • ptsant
      • 9 months ago

      I would need to put a 43″ on a separate desk to make enough distance between it and myself. Definitely no point in putting it 3 feet a way. So I see the appeal of having a VESA mount.

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