G.Skill’s latest Trident Z kit bumps Threadripper RAM to 3466 MT/s

If you're into hardware at all—and if you're reading this, we presume that you are—then you probably already know that Ryzen parts need fast RAM to maximize their potential. You probably also know that the more memory channels you pile on, the harder it is to maintain signal integrity (and thus system stability). That's more than likely the reason that Ryzen Threadripper doesn't usually match its single-die cousins' maximum memory transfer rates. G.Skill, never content to let things be as they are, just announced that it has new RAM on the way that takes all four of a Threadripper's memory channels to 3466 MT/s.

The latest Trident Z RGB RAM falls under G.Skill's "TZRX" models, meaning that it's high-performance RGB LED-laden memory intended for an AMD platform. In this particular case, the four modules of DDR4 memory running at 3466 MT/s are meant for the AMD X399 platform upon which Threadripper CPUs generally rest. Unusually, G.Skill's announcement didn't include a range of capacities or speeds; it seems this new RAM will come only in a pack of four 8GB modules, totaling 32GB capacity.

Like most high-performance DDR4 memory, G.Skill's upcoming Trident Z for Threadripper requires 1.35 volts to do its thing. Latencies on the new Threadripper-targeted RAM are pretty loose: The CAS latency is 18 cycles, and it only goes up from there. Still, on Ryzen, the transfer rate is arguably more important, given the way it interacts with the CPU's interconnects.

Continuing the "light on details" trend, G.Skill declined to say how much it would ask for the new kit, but the company did remark that it would be available in Q1 of this year.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 10 months ago

    Had a bit of dilemma with mobile Ryzen recently. It’s with an Acer Nitro 5 with a Ryzen 2500U and a stick of Crucial 4GB of DDR4-2666 running at 2400MT/s and CL17. I installed a Kingston 4GB DDR4-2400 CL17. Will it have slightly lower performance than if I installed DDR4-2666 but presumably higher latency at 2666 but running it at 2400/CL17? I reckon the Crucial is running at practically the same speed and CL as the Kingston.

    • DPete27
    • 10 months ago

    How does the RAM dictate what frequency the memory controller on the CPU is comfortable running at?

    Obviously on the RAM side of things, loosening timings allows for higher frequency. Does the same apply on the CPU side of the equation?

    IF that’s the case, couldn’t you achieve this same result with most any 3600MT/s CL18 or better kit? Maybe it’s just about having the 4 compatible sticks?

      • Tom Yum
      • 10 months ago

      The Infinity Fabric runs at the same speed as the memory controller, which runs at half the speed of the memory (as DDR = two transfers per clock cycle). So 3600MT/s RAM would have the Infinity Fabric running faster than at 3466, but it is law of diminishing returns as well, beyond 3200 the performance increase drops away as inter-core latency no longer remains a performance bottleneck. So it would be a toss up whether the slight increase in Infinity Fabric bandwidth would outweigh the higher memory latency. Certainly would be an interesting article to read!

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 10 months ago

    Wake me up when intelripper 3 comes out

      • sweatshopking
      • 10 months ago

      Cancelled

        • ClickClick5
        • 10 months ago

        Gold right here.
        Intel: If it don’t fit in a “power efficient” package, we ditch it super quick!
        AMD: Alright, we’ll make big chips cause, well, being power efficient is actually kinda hard.
        IBM: *laughs while reactors run POWERx*

      • ronch
      • 10 months ago

      It is nigh.

    • Bauxite
    • 10 months ago

    Those really loose timings are totally not good b-die kits, you would be better off buying their “not specifically for threadripper” but proper good chip based 3200C14 or 3600C15 kits. Latency matters, not just maxing out the clock.

    Zen is going to be hand timings for awhile, XMP rarely turns out well.

    /speaking from experience

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