Tuesday deals: A 512-GB NVMe SSD plus 16 GB of fast RGB LED RAM for $160, and more

Howdy, folks. The internet at large is probably running out of ink discussing the merits of the Radeon VII to death. We've recently taken a good, hard look at it, and one outstanding question is how it fares when gaming at 2560×1440, a notch down from the 4K resolution with HDR that we originally tested it with. We've just answered that question, and you can take a good look at the results. When you're done, be sure to take a look at today's selection of deals. We've got a few smokin' hot ones.

  • The first and juiciest deal today is one heck of a handy combo. The Intel 660p drive is a modest but perfectly serviceable and reliable NVMe SSD that can push up to 1800 MB/s in sequential reads and writes. It does pretty okay with random I/O, too, at 220 K IOPS in either direction. Meanwhile, the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16-GB kit of 3000 MT/s DIMMs is sleek, sexy, and fast. These are some of the best-looking sticks around. Newegg will pack up both items for you in exchange for just $159.99, or $47.99 off the individual items' price. I'd advise grabbing this combo before it runs out, folks.

  • Everyone's talking about Nvidia's RTX cards these days, but the GTX 10-series offerings are still pretty darn fast. One such item is the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070. This card is pretty simple—it's got a hefty cooler with three fans, a boost clock of 1822 MHz in OC mode, and it will set you back only $299.99 at Newegg. You also get a Fortnite gift card and a Gigabyte Aorus RGB SLI HB bridge that may come in handy for some dual-card action.

  • Proceeding onto storage, we have the HP EX920 512-GB NVMe solid-state drive, a familiar sight around these parts. This speedy drive is good for pushing 3200 MB/s in sequential reads and 1600 MB/s in writes. Those are strong figures, but where random I/O is concerned, the EX920 whups some tail with the ability to do 340 K random read IOPS and 260 K write IOPS. You can pick one of these up today for $78.99 from Newegg.

  • Fast drives like the one above are all well and good, but for mass storage purposes, you're probably better off looking at the Western Digital Elements 6-TB external drive. There ain't much to say about it—it's compact, discreet, and costs only $99.99 at Newegg with cart code EMCTVUU26. That works out to $16.67 per terabyte.

  • Nope, we still haven't run out of RAM deals. The G.Skill Ripjaws V 16-GB dual-channel kit with 3000 MT/s sticks comes clad in generously sized red heat spreaders and has 16-18-18-38 timings. Its best spec is the dollar amount it's going for right now: just $89.99 at the good ol' Newegg. Dang.

  • One of the worst punishments that people often subject themselves to is using a low-quality mouse. The Corsair M65 Pro RGB is here to change that. It's got a 12,000-DPI sensor; an aluminum base with adjustable weight; and a large, handy sniper button. There's a dash of RGB LED lighting for the bling factor, and the top is dressed in a rather fetching white finish. Newegg will sell you one of these for a stupid-low $29.99.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: Not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • smilingcrow
    • 8 months ago

    “The Intel 660p drive is a modest but perfectly serviceable and reliable NVMe SSD ”

    Launched Q3/18 and one of the first consumer drives ever to feature QLC so I’d not be so quick to label it reliable.

    • not@home
    • 8 months ago

    I have a RAM question. I am looking at upgrading the RAM in my Skylake 6700k, Asus prime z270-a system. I would like something faster than the 2400 stuff I have. I am not sure how fast my CPU will take though. Do most RAM sticks Have multiple XMP profiles? If I buy 3000 and my CPU doesn’t like it, is there a slower profile, like 2800 for example, that I can enable instead. I have not overclocked any of my CPUs since my first PC, a Celeron 300A. Is 2400 fast enough? Should I just get two more sticks of that to double my capacity?

      • ColeLT1
      • 8 months ago

      Skylake can handle around 3400 up to 3600 before you have to tweak any settings. If you want something faster, say 3600-4000, you will have set tweak VCCIO and SA voltages. You are safe to set CPU VCCIO to 1.000v-1.250V from 0.968V and the CPU System Agent Voltage to 1.1v-1.300V from 1.056V with good cpu cooling.

      • tacitust
      • 8 months ago

      Just be aware that getting RAM running at XMP profile frequencies isn’t the most reliable process in the world, so it may not be the CPU that’s the limiting factor. Also, once you get up above 2800, the law of diminishing returns kicks in, and any performance boost you get will be minimal.

      I have two RAM sticks that run fine at the XMP profile speed of 2800, but the next pair I bought proved unreliable at that speed, causing the occasional BSOD. At 2666 they’re rock solid.

      • morphine
      • 8 months ago

      I just wouldn’t do that at all. The benefit you’re going to get from faster RAM in your system, especially with a CPU that’s three generations ago (I have that exact chip too) isn’t going to be worth the outlay.

      Just save the cash for a meatier upgrade (which might actually include the 3200 MT/s RAM anyway).

    • techguy
    • 8 months ago

    QLC + NVME makes about as much sense as a 4-banger in a Corvette.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 months ago

      Or building a device that’s in your grubby hand all day and then finishing it in white.

      • Martin the Kiteboy
      • 8 months ago

      Yeah, a 4-banger in a van seems like a better idea, two seats only in the Corvette so things may get a little tight.

      • Waco
      • 8 months ago

      A Corvette with a well-tuned 4 cylinder could be as fast / faster than many lazy V8s (even the phenomenal LS/LT series). The same goes with QLC NAND – the controller and parallelism make all the difference in the world.

        • tay
        • 8 months ago

        Lotus Elise? 🙂

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 8 months ago

          Isn’t that just a turbo Miata?

            • Waco
            • 8 months ago

            My turbo Miata before I hacked it up was definitely faster than my Corvette.

            Now that it’s 1500 pounds wet, it’s even more one-sided!

            • MOSFET
            • 8 months ago

            Got pics?

            • Waco
            • 8 months ago

            Just Google “Exocet” to get an idea. 🙂

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 8 months ago

        Agreed. The current v4 mustang is no slouch.
        [url<]https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/buying-maintenance/news/a33178/550-hp-mustang-ecoboost/[/url<]

          • notinuse
          • 8 months ago

          V4?

      • Goty
      • 8 months ago

      QLC is only slower when it comes to writes, so the better read speeds offered by NVMe devices can still be valuable when using a QLC drive, especially considering that most “normal” workloads are very read heavy anyhow.

        • Waco
        • 8 months ago

        QLC is slower on read (latency) as well, but not to the same extent as writes.

          • Goty
          • 8 months ago

          Everything I’ve seen puts them largely in line with other types of NAND. Can you point me to some real world testing that shows otherwise?

            • Waco
            • 8 months ago

            The specs for the raw flash are public. Longer to program and to read as the levels per cell increase.

            • Goty
            • 8 months ago

            I guess the additional latency must be fairly small, then.

      • mikewinddale
      • 8 months ago

      The SLC cache in the 660p makes it approximately as fast as any MLC or TLC drive for short bursts. For some people, that’s a benefit.

      For example, I regularly load several-GB datasets into RAM to run statistical analysis. Once the dataset is loaded, everything happens in the CPU and RAM. I don’t write very much back except small log files (a few kilobytes) containing the results.

      So for me, a 660p could make sense. Reading my several-GB dataset will be 3 times faster on an 1800 MB/s 660p than on a 600 MB/s SATA SSD. Instead of taking 9 seconds, I can load my dataset in 3 seconds.

      That’s not a huge benefit, but it’s still something, and if the price is right, it’s something I’m willing to pay for.

        • drwho
        • 8 months ago

        Thats not really how it works tho, the 9 secs from sata might consist of say 6 secs of “overhead” and 3 secs from the drive, whereas from nvme its 5 secs of “overhead” and 1 sec from the drive, ..not the 3x improvement you hope , but only 50% , imperceptible to most ppl.
        ISTBC.

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