Latest Windows update highlights HoloLens ahead of MWC announcement

Microsoft released Windows 10 build 17763.316 yesterday, and the HoloLens was front and center. It's mentioned in the note atop the release notes page, and Microsoft makes it seem a little urgent that current HoloLens devices get the update forthwith. In a recursive Windows Update update, this Windows update is pushing an update to the Windows Update Client so that Windows Update is more reliable when it henceforth updates Windows on HoloLens. 

It's not coincidental that the debut of the HoloLens 2 appears to be right around the corner. It's hard to believe it's been more than four years since the first HoloLens demos were shown, and it seems like every year there's an expectation that the second generation of the immersive headset is nigh. The fourth time's the charm, though; it's widely believed that Microsoft is going to announce the successor to the original HoloLens at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on February 24. Official but mysterious pinned tweets like this one from Alex Kipman, whose title at Microsoft might as well be "HoloLens-Everything Guy," certainly support the notion that the world will have a HoloLens 2 by the end of February.  

It's likely, then, that Microsoft is pushing out last-minute updates to ensure that Windows and HoloLens are playing nice. 

Aside from the above, the other HoloLens-specific item in the update list describes an issue "that allows users to bypass the lock screen sign in process in some work flows."

The remainder of the updates focus quite a bit on security, as they're wont to do:

  • Addresses an issue that fails to set the LmCompatibilityLevel value correctly. LmCompatibilityLevel specifies the authentication mode and session security. 
  • Addresses an issue that may prevent applications that use a Microsoft Jet database with the Microsoft Access 97 file format from opening. This issue occurs if the database has column names greater than 32 characters. The database fails to open with the error, "Unrecognized Database Format".
  • Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Edge from connecting using an IP address.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the Windows Hello for Business Hybrid Key Trust deployment sign-in to fail if Windows 2019 Server domain controllers (DC) are used for authentication. The error is, "That option is temporarily unavailable. For now, please use a different method to sign in". If Active Directory (AD) activity tracing is enabled, a Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) exception may occur in the Windows 2019 DC when processing a user's sign in.
  • Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Microsoft Edge, Windows Server, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Graphics, and Windows App Platform and Frameworks.

If you're a Windows 10 user, this update will find its way to you automatically.

 

Comments closed
    • BillyBuerger
    • 9 months ago

    [quote<]If you're a Windows 10 user, this update will find its way to you automatically.[/quote<] Oh, is that why one of our employees got kicked out of a client RDP last night while she had work ongoing. Thanks Microsoft.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 months ago

      If you’re still getting kicked out because of windows updates you’re doing something wrong. There are many ways to control updates, and they generally shouldn’t be an issue anymore (as in years)

        • DancinJack
        • 9 months ago

        this^

        • BillyBuerger
        • 9 months ago

        Well, this was on our client system. So it’s on them to control this. But outside of Group Policy settings, Microsoft has been making it very difficult to avoid automatic updates rebooting PCs. If you know of ways to block this, please share. I have yet to see any easy way to do it in Win10 Home. I think what I’m currently doing on my home PC is the one where you delete the reboot task from the system tasks and create a folder with that name so Windows can recreate the task. But it’s a hack job that shouldn’t be required.

          • Shouefref
          • 9 months ago

          As far as I know even with W10 Pro you can only postpone the updates, but not make sure they’re never activated. Which I think is a bore. Only W10 Enterprise can deactivate updates totally.

            • CScottG
            • 9 months ago

            Win 10 LTSC gets rid of updates and “telemetry”..

          • sweatshopking
          • 9 months ago

          Block? no. Schedule? yes, in updates in settings. it’ll only finally kick you out after you postpone repeatedly. instead of postponing forever, pick a time you’re not busy and it’ll install them then. Usually something like 3am is popular.

            • BillyBuerger
            • 9 months ago

            Not busy? When is that? It’s much more convenient and safe for me to decide when a good time to reboot is. I always have things going on, either sitting at my PC or working remotely. The safest update is when I make sure things are at a good state to reboot and do it when I’m there in case of any issues. It’s happened before where an update, or just a reboot has left my PC inaccessible. So all I want is to be able to install updates and reboot when it makes sense, not some fuzzy “inactive” time.

            Or another example was when I had a game server running. Just running Windows as it was easier. So I was never “on” the PC. Since I wasn’t actively on it, Windows would just reboot when it wanted. Then I would go to play the game and the server was down. In that case, I just disabled the update service. Then every so often when I was on the server, I would enable, update, reboot then disable again. It worked but again, an annoying work around to something that doesn’t need to happen.

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 months ago

            IIRC windows will happily wait a week before trying to force an update. Find a time in a week to restart and you’ll be fine.
            Again, this is only on home editions, and from a security perspective, personally i think it makes sense.

            • curtisb
            • 9 months ago

            See my other reply further down, but you should also investigate running Windows Server Update Services. It’s extremely easy to configure and you set what updates are available to PC’s, and when those updates are available.

            • cygnus1
            • 9 months ago

            Yeah, see, folks doing what you do is why Windows XP was a security nightmare in the end. Users disabled auto-updates and I can’t count how many times I worked on someones computer that ended up being months, sometimes years, out of date on security updates…. Just don’t try to disable it. Your way of doing things is inherently insecure. Don’t think of ways to break what Windows 10 is doing, just adapt your way of doing things to being more secure. Almost every month EVERY OS has security updates for vulnerabilities being exploited in the wild. Updates need to happen religiously on ALL devices running ANY OS. Operate more securely and you won’t have a problem.

            • Redocbew
            • 9 months ago

            This makes my PC sound a bit too much like a toaster. The average toaster does a pretty terrible job of creating toast when you think about it. Most do fine at creating slightly warm bread, or blast furnace charcoal, but trying to get something in between can be rather difficult at times.

            I know that’s way off the mark on how an “average user” thinks about their PC, and Microsoft has plenty of good reasons to care of about them more than me, but I don’t care. I want toast damnit.

          • curtisb
          • 9 months ago

          You can’t complain about a system being force rebooted when you have the ability to control that in a domain environment with Group Policy. If you’re not doing that, that’s on you, not your users. You should be configuring Group Policy across the board and not rely on an end user to configure something they likely aren’t even aware of. You have much more control over the Windows Update settings with Group Policy anyway. You’re doing disserve to your users (aka your customers) and your company by knowingly allowing productivity issues to be caused by Windows Update.

          • cygnus1
          • 9 months ago

          No no no. On end user computers that are not controlled by corporate policies (Group Policy) it should be near impossible to disable the auto updating. The easier it is for the user to disable it, it’s made infinitely easier for malware to disable it.

          If it’s being used for business, Win10 Home is not appropriate to begin with.

          Edit: and on top of it being easier for malware if it’s easy for the user, it’s also made easy to forget to turn it back on. That was the case with WinXP. SO many users would turn it off and NEVER turn it back on. Thus instantly creating a super exploitable system.

        • CScottG
        • 9 months ago

        ..or you are using the “Home” version (which will likely change the settings on you every time most anything “microsoft update” is updated).

    • simbant
    • 9 months ago

    ” nigh ” really ?

      • GrimDanfango
      • 9 months ago

      The end of “nigh” is not nigh.

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