Tuesday deals: an Intel 660p 512-GB NVMe drive for $67 and much more

A fair day to thee, good gerbils. If you're looking for an interesting article to read, may I suggest Colton Westrate's "The death of Windows Phone and the five stages of mobile grief"? It's a rather amusing read about one idiot man's quixotic quest to hold onto a dead phone operating system or a silly reasonable facsimile thereof. Go ahead and give it a scan. In the meantime, check out our selection of contemporary hardware deals.

  • Our leading deal today is a rather simple one: an honest-to-goodness NVMe drive at SATA prices. The Intel 660p 512-GB PCIe drive comes fitted with 3D QLC NAND and is capable of pushing up to 1800 MB/s sequentially in reads or writes. The figures for random I/O are pretty nice for an affordable drive at 220 K IOPS in either direction. Newegg will hand you this tiny drive in its tiny box for just $67.99 with the promo code EMCTVUD29.

  • Our second-hottest item is the Lenovo Yoga 920 fold-back convertible. This fetching high-end machine packs quite the wallop. It's got an Intel Core i7-8750U processor coupled with 16 GB of RAM and a 512-GB solid-state drive. Those specs are impressive already, but the best part is that the 14" touch display has a resolution of 3840×2160, just the ticket for high-DPI goodness. Finally, there's a Thunderbolt 3 port for good measure. Best Buy will let you have this beast of a portable for $1,154.99.

  • That Intel SSD up above is also present in a sweet combo deal. The ASRock Z390 Phantom Gaming 4 motherboard has a 10-phase power layout, USB 3.1 Gen2 ports in Type-A and Type-C flavors, and an Intel Ethernet controller. As for the Intel 660p 512-GB NVMe SSD, hey, just go back a couple paragraphs for the deets. Newegg will set you up with both items for the low price of $149.98, or $55 off the regular total. 

  • If you're building a machine with one of today's power-hungry high-end CPUs, it's a good idea to invest in a nice liquid cooler like the Corsair Hydro H100i Pro 240-mm CLC. This unit comes with two ML120 magnetic-levitation fans and RGB LED lighting on its quiet pump. Newegg's selling this unit for $109.99, and there's a $20 rebate card available. Should you need to go bigger, the Corsair Hydro H115i Pro 360-mm variant is currently going for $124.99 at Newegg, and you can get $25 back with the included rebate card.

  • There's nothing quite like an extra-sharp, high-DPI desktop, like that provided by the LG 27UK600-W monitor. This 27" IPS display has a resolution of 3840×2160 and a color gamut that should cover 99% of the sRGB space. There's FreeSync and HDR10 support on tap as well. As an added bonus, the bezels are quite thin. Grab one of these from Best Buy for just $349.99.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: Not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 5 months ago

    I reckon the US gets all the great tech deals. In most other parts of the world like Canada, many parts of Europe, Asia, New Zealand, people pay quite a bit more for electronics. Even in Taiwan, when I went there many years ago, I expected laptop prices to be much lower but they’re not.

      • Shobai
      • 5 months ago

      Some people have a bit of a chip on their shoulder, over here, about the so-called “Australia tax” . For the most part, once you factor in currency conversion and add 10% for our GST, you’re very much in the ballpark of local pricing.

      Amazon opened up over here, and there was hope they’d save us from the high prices we were forced to pay. They’re by and large more expensive than the local retailers, now that the government expects them to collect GST and pass it onto the government.

      • firewired
      • 5 months ago

      I can agree with that thought, as a Canadian. Exchange rates are not really being reflected in purchase pricing. If the CAD-to-USD exchange is 25% I still find we pay 30% – 40% more than what the item costs in USD.

      The last couple of years I have been scouring Amazon’s warehouse deals for returned/lighlty-used parts to save on the up-front expense, but that comes with risks as well. Shame that we have to do that when we really should not have to.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 5 months ago

        Retailers seem to think us Canadians are push overs and deserve to pay more.

        I think they got that idea from our telecom [s<]abusers[/s<] companies.

          • DancinJack
          • 5 months ago

          I’m not Canadian, but I would bet you a new PC that’s not WHY stuff is priced higher in Canada.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 5 months ago

      This is a common misconception. It’s true that in some places people do pay higher prices for electronics. However, in other parts of the world—like most of Europe—the prices are about the same, or even lower due to exchange rates.

      This perception seems to exist because US prices do not include any form of sales tax, while in Europe and the UK, prices almost always include tax. Not only that, the “sales tax” (read: VAT) in Europe is generally much higher than in the US: around 21%, versus the 6-9% we typically pay in the US.

      As an example: [url=https://www.mindfactory.de/product_info.php/6GB-Palit-GeForce-RTX-2060-StormX-Aktiv-PCIe-3-0-x16–Retail-_1292710.html<]this Palit GeForce RTX 2060 at Mindfactory.de[/url<] is €348. Accounting for the 19% VAT in Germany, we come out to a pre-tax price of €292, which at current exchange rates is about $333. Meanwhile, the cheapest RTX 2060 you'll find in the US today is [url=https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07M6VMTRQ/<]this Gigabyte shorty card on Amazon for $349.[/url<] Obviously in poorer countries you'll find higher prices, but generally speaking this holds for what we'd consider the developed world. In Australia, [url=https://www.mwave.com.au/product/inno3d-geforce-rtx-2060-twin-x2-6gb-video-card-ac21082<]Mwave has an Inno3D RTX 2060 card for AU$549[/url<]—that's $358 in USD after accounting for Australia's 10% GST. A few dollars more but not outrageous. Over in Japan, you can find a Galax RTX 2060 card [i<](URL struck because TR's comment software hates Japanese characters)[/i<] for ¥47,952. After accounting for Japan's 8% tax, that comes out to around $400, which is high. However, in Japan, they still have a strong culture of local walk-in shops, and you're likely to find better prices at a shop in Akihabara or Nipponbashi than on Amazon.

        • UberGerbil
        • 5 months ago

        Yes, and if (for example) I bought any of those on Amazon and had it delivered to me in Seattle, the price would be 10.1% higher because of the local+state sales tax Amazon is required to collect. (One of the motivators for me to buy from NewEgg or any other company based outside the state and that does not have operations in WA state and therefore does not collect the tax, though of course I’m supposed to still declare and pay it myself)

    • ronch
    • 5 months ago

    I was about to drop my jaw when I saw that Intel SSD selling that low then it hit me.

    NVMe + QLC is like putting cheap Chinese tires on a Mustang.

      • Waco
      • 5 months ago

      Except that they’re great for the 99.9% of Mustangs that never hit the track.

    • tay
    • 5 months ago

    The LG UK-600 is a fantastic display that lacks height adjustment. For $50 more, you can get the LG UK-650 at Microcenter that has height adjustment. The USB-C variant with speakers is $550 on sale or another $150 more.

      • Krogoth
      • 5 months ago

      I got one here and I’m quite happy for capabilities at its price point. It is VESA-mount capable so you can throw in a third-party mount if the stock mount isn’t good enough.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 5 months ago

    [quote<]If you're looking for an interesting article to read, may I suggest Colton Westrate's "The death of Windows Phone and the five stages of mobile grief"? It's a rather amusing read about one idiot man's quixotic quest to hold onto a dead phone operating system or a silly reasonable facsimile thereof. [/quote<] I read ssk's posts all the time

    • Voldenuit
    • 5 months ago

    [quote<]f you're building a machine with one of today's power-hungry high-end CPUs, it's a good idea to invest in a nice liquid cooler like the Corsair Hydro H100i Pro 240-mm CLC.[/quote<] I'm very happy with the performance of my H100i, but quiet, it is not, by any definition of the word. I have the fans on min rpm and the pump on 'balanced' (1900 rpm vs ~2800), and it is by far the loudest component in the PC.

      • firewired
      • 5 months ago

      The tech specs for the H100i show max fan speeds ~2700rpm. And those are 120mm’s, so they will be loud. If your pump is not annnoyingly noisy I would suggest replacing the fans with slower-max-speed 120mm fans from Noctua, like the NF-F12 pwm. The Corsair Maglev 120mm’s might sound enticing, but avoid them for this use as they run high-rpm at max.

      I read a lot of reviews of various CLC’s before making a choice, and admittedly my choice was not on the market yet when the H100i was new/established.

      I settled on the H115i Pro RGB 280mm CLC. It comes with 2 x 140mm Maglev low-speed fans. The pump is near-silent regardless of the setting. For the fans, in Quiet mode I cannot even hear them. In Balanced mode, which I use for gaming or encoding, the fans can be heard but it is a comfortably quiet ‘whoosh’ sound that is just audible enough to let me know they are whirring away. I cannot hear them with a headset on and the volume on the lowest setting while gaming or listening to music, and my PC (Nano-S) sits on my desk 2-feet away from me.

      Silence matters.

    • freebird
    • 5 months ago

    So is it Newegg or Intel pushing deals on the Intel 660p NVMe 512GB drive? Last week it was bundled with some memory (that I wouldn’t buy) and this week bundled with a Mobo or stand-alone deal. Maybe one or both have a quota to meet.

    I’m seriously contemplating the stand-alone for $67 though… I have a build or two that would be nice and faster than a $50-$60 512GB SSD.

    Anyone running with these already? Do they hold up when filled or used for awhile?

    Although for $75 there is a Silicon Power 512GB – NVMe rated at 3200MB/3000MB read/write listed at Newegg. Man this stuff is getting cheap.

    [url<]https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?reviews=all&Item=N82E16820301394&Description=512%20GB%20SSD&cm_re=512_GB_SSD-_-20-301-394-_-Product[/url<]

      • morphine
      • 5 months ago

      Unless you have a very specific type of workload that benefits from the higher rates (in which you probably want to look at a 970 EVO or something instead), picking a well-known manufacturer with good warranty and support is a wiser move in my book.

        • cygnus1
        • 5 months ago

        I concur. That drive is great for a regular user machine.

      • cynan
      • 5 months ago

      Probably Micron (discounting the QLC)

      • ronch
      • 5 months ago

      QLC almost automatically relegates any SSD to data drive duties but this is an M.2 drive and most motherboards only have one M 2 slot and most folks will probably want to populate it with a proper MLC or TLC drive. So in terms of use case I dunno. This Intel SSD practically locks itself in a cage and throws the key away.

        • DavidC1
        • 5 months ago

        Why?

        Because of endurance?

        The lowest capacity version of the 660p has a rated endurance of 100TB. That’s more than enough to last 10+ years for most people. Really, the electronics in the drive will die before it reaches rated endurance limits.

        For most people, it could go to only 25TB and it’ll be enough to last a decade.

          • Goty
          • 5 months ago

          I suspect it’s more because of QLC NAND’s atrocious write performance. I think they still have their place in a rather large number of scenarios given that most consumer workloads are rather read-heavy, but that’s only if they come with a significant price advantage over TLC or MLC drives.

            • DavidC1
            • 5 months ago

            Tech Report reviews of the two QLC SSDs show quite peppy loading times.

            Just like everything SSD, it always comes out exaggerated. The first comments about the QLC SSDs were about the “mere” 100TB endurance. I used an X25-M on my main system gaming for 4 years before I put it on a secondary drive. I think the total writes during that time were less than 7TB.

            Seriously. It’s totally fine for consumer workloads. Would people prefer a platter HDD instead?

        • tu2thepoo
        • 5 months ago

        People have been saying this kind of stuff since MLC and TLC were introduced. “No SLC? No way I’m paying for cheap MLC!” and so on.

        Turns out once you’re a few controller generations in, it doesn’t matter outside the data center. The first generation always has bad performance… but that’s why I never buy first gen stuff any more.

    • DancinJack
    • 5 months ago

    Bruno, mate, it’s Tuesday 🙂

      • Growler
      • 5 months ago

      It’s Friday somewhere.*

      *It’s not Friday anywhere. Void where prohibited.

        • UberGerbil
        • 5 months ago

        It will be Friday again [url=https://i.gifer.com/5O1A.mp4<]soon[/url<].

      • morphine
      • 5 months ago

      Why does my speedometer read 88 MPH?

        • K-L-Waster
        • 5 months ago

        Probably because you’re somebody’s density.

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