National Grain-Free Day Shortbread

No pane, no grain.

PC hardware and computing

  1. Asus TUF Z390-Plus Gaming (Wi-Fi) review @ bit-tech
  2. MSI MEG X299 Creation motherboard review @ Guru3D
  3. Synology DS1019+ review @ Hexus
  4. Huawei MateBook 13 review @ HotHardware
  5. Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3 review @ KitGuru
  6. ADATA XPG EMIX H30 gaming headset review @ Legit Reviews
  7. Microsoft Pro IntelliMouse review @ TechPowerUp
  8. The Samsung 983 ZET (Z-NAND) SSD review @ AnandTech

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Paradox launch PC/Xbone cross-platform mod support @ Rock Paper Shotgun
  2. Valve is as puzzled as you are about why they sell movies on Steam @ Quarter To Three
  3. Canadian team demonstrates touch-sensitive VR crystal ball @ New Atlas
  4. Lightsaber dueling registered as official sport in France @ Slashdot (it begins)

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. DIY x-ray machine becomes CT scanner @ HackADay
  2. Startup selling transfusions of young blood ceases treatments following FDA warning @ New Atlas

Science, technology, and space news

  1. The woeful world of worldwide e-waste @ HackADay
  2. InSight begins posting daily weather reports from Mars @ New Atlas (perspective served here)
  3. Seabubbles brings its electric, self-stabilizing, hydrofoiling Bubble Taxis to Miami @ New Atlas (the only word in that headline I don't like is "taxis")

Cheese, memes, and shiny things

  1. Aldi debuts green and alcohol-infused cheeses for St. Patrick's Day @ people.com
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • Arvald
    • 9 months ago

    Grain free day?
    I’ll crack a beer open for that one.
    I may even crack a few grains and start a batch of beer.

    • Erebos
    • 9 months ago

    [quote<]Startup selling transfusions of young blood ceases treatments following FDA warning[/quote<] You mean "Snake-oil clinic promising anti-ageing blood transfusions gets shut down by the FDA".

    • Unknown-Error
    • 9 months ago

    How is there a Short[b<][u<]bread[/u<][/b<] without grain?

      • K-L-Waster
      • 9 months ago

      Well, it would be [i<]really[/i<] short on bread...

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 9 months ago

      Either poor joke at attempt to be edgy or ignorant to Paleo diet and grain free bread.

      Which one?

        • paulWTAMU
        • 9 months ago

        Paleo grain free bread is gross. It’s like meat free burgers; just quit trying and either have a tasty veggie meal OR a burger and avoid the fail.

          • BIF
          • 9 months ago

          This is genius! ^

          Too many grains are bad for us. Bad for the cows, too; causes some kind of GI “perforation”.

          Perforation is a bad thing unless you’re doing it to the wild boars that have decided to eat you. Then nothing short of perforation will do, and grains will take a lot longer than you have left.

    • Antias
    • 9 months ago

    The irony of “grain free” on the “shortbread” made me laugh out a mouthful of “wheeties”… 🙂

    • SlappedSilly
    • 9 months ago

    Can’t wait for Vaccination Choice Awareness Day.

      • drfish
      • 9 months ago

      Don’t hold your breath.

        • SlappedSilly
        • 9 months ago

        Hmm. My searches are not turning up any substantive justification for holding my breath regardless. Not a lot of studies, and nothing conclusive. It was fun, though.

        /me is not an elite breath-holding diver.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 9 months ago

      The anti-vaccination movement is mostly religious cultists. They’re probably going to take “Give us this day our daily bread” literally. The “gluten-free” movement is a hipster fad for all but the very very tiny percentage of the populace that actually has an allergy.

        • MFergus
        • 9 months ago

        Anti-vaccation isn’t just religious kooks. It’s one of those weird things where they overlap with some organic anti-GMO progressive kooks.

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          The whole anti-vaccination movement is build on complete falsehoods. Yes, there are risks with taking vaccines but none of them are related to so called “side-effects”.

          People are just blissfully ignorant of the childhood diseases that used to ravage young demographics. FYI, I have two great-uncles who had died in childhood from common childhood illnesses that are now easily preventable today. They are starting to learn again why whooping cough, measles and other stuff were kinda of a big deal.

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            Obviously, everyone’s opinion will be highly colored by their personal experiences. So, speaking as someone who has experienced significant medical issues as a result of ‘supposedly safe’ and ‘low risk’ drug therapies, I respectfully disagree with many of the statements people are making here.

            I was disabled and unable to walk for a good 6 weeks due to courses of Fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Several of the doctors I saw during this period thought I was crazy or a ‘kook’ for making the completely rational connection between the drugs and my ‘side effect’ issues. The impact that class of drugs has on tendons in particular, and the nervous system, is now a lot better known and advertised. However, it took a couple decades for the drug companies and doctors to actually (begrudgingly) acknowledge the associated risks. There’s still very little known about how exactly those drugs affect the body. Sadly, I don’t think the medical community is rushing to find out either.

            Not surprisingly, I’ve become quite skeptical of many ‘safe’ or ‘harmless’ therapies or drugs, and the motivations behind doctors prescribing them. ‘Do no harm’ can’t be followed in all situations, particularly when ignorance abounds.

            Therefore, I have no doubt that some children to some extent have probably been negatively impacted by courses of vaccinations in more recent years….especially since a) vaccinations are not tested to the same degree that any other FDA-approved drugs are and b) the number of vaccinations children are given today is easily 3-4 times the number a good number of us were given as kids (some of which I don’t understand the need for)

            That said, I now have a child and I -do- plan on having them vaccinated. I’m not obtuse, and obviously vaccinations are necessary. But, to proclaim anyone that has any uneasiness or trepidation regarding the impacts a vaccine (or more likely, collection of vaccines) might have on their child a ‘nut’, a ‘religious cultist’, a ‘kook’, or ‘GMO granola hippie’ is pure hubris.

            • Redocbew
            • 9 months ago

            If you’re lucky enough to be an oddball who for one reason or another does get weird side effects, then that just means you’re an oddball. I don’t see any reason why that should cast doubt on the field of medicine in general. For reference, this is coming from someone who(probably) had a case of Lyme disease back in the mid-80s, so I’ve also seen first hand how things work when medicine doesn’t have a great answer to why you’re sick.

            Yeah it’d be great if we knew why that happened and could create treatments which didn’t do that, but it’d also be great if we could have room temperature superconductors, or any of the other amazing theoretical widgets we’ve been able to dream of so far.

            That being said I would agree there is plenty of room between being a conspiracy theorist and being an empty skull who never gives any of it a second thought.

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            I understand what you’re saying, and I’m very sorry to hear about your fight with Lyme, especially during that period of time. One of my brothers had a similar battle, though it was early to mid 90’s.

            In any event, the real issue I have is that I do not believe for a minute that I am some medical oddball, at least in terms of the antibiotic reaction. I saw an orthopedic specialist about my tendon issues, informed him of impacts I observed from taking the antibiotic, and his response was, literally, ‘I see this -all- the time.’ In fact, one of his associates’ fathers had just experienced two ruptured achilles tendons from having taken the same drugs I had.

            My suspicion is that these issues happen fairly frequently to people that take fluoroquinolones, but they are either not recognized that they are connected to the drug, or they simply go under-reported. That, coupled with many doctors’ dismissive (and superior) attitudes, and the drug industries’ vested self-interest, and problems like this get buried for a long time (intentionally or unintentionally).

            I feel the same happens for many things in modern medicine, and vaccines are no exception. I don’t think it used to be so much of an issue with vaccines (when children were only given a small number), but now that the governing medical bodies are so ‘vaccine happy’, I think compounding the amount being administered has caused some children issues that they otherwise would not have had.

            • Redocbew
            • 9 months ago

            I’m not a parent, but I wouldn’t think you’d need to have a bad experience with medical care to be critical about the care of your child. I would also like to think that those who view medicine as a business or whose intentions range from indifferent to bad(or worse) are the minority, but I guess that’s where the “don’t be an empty skull” thing comes in.

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            True, bringing a child into the context of medical care is a whole different dynamic.

            In an ideal world, healthcare is as well-intentioned and altruistic an arena as one could define. Unfortunately, it’s a business run by humans like any other. There are truly great doctors and nurses that make gigantic, life-saving differences every single day in their profession. Unfortunately, there are a good many terrible, incompetent, or simply ignorant doctors that make life-altering choices and decisions for people for the worse. Also, healthcare, pharmaceutical, and insurance businesses all make corporate decisions to ensure their continued existence, many times at the expense of the patients they are supposed to be serving. It’s sad, but true.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 9 months ago

            I’d take 6 weeks rather than a lifetime with polio. It’s a cost/benefit analysis where with side effects greatly out weighing the risks. Your statement that children are receiving many more vaccinations than when you had is incomplete. What’s your point? Are you suggesting there is a positive correlation between the number and side effects exceeding the benefit? If there is no data suggesting that, then your internal bias is impeding rational thought. If there is data, finish your statement because manufacturing doubt is what the loonies feed on.

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            Different drugs with different effects (acute antibiotic induced tendon damage vs. potentially chronic life-long vaccine induced brain development impairment), but I understand what you mean.

            My point in indicating that children these days are given many more vaccines than previously is several-fold. Children might be administered as many as four or more shots at one time over the course of a great many inoculation visits. The issue with this being that babies are very tiny humans, and where in the past with fewer vaccines, perhaps their body was able to assimilate and deal with one or even two shots at once…..now with so many vaccines being administered there’s potentially a ‘critical mass’ reached beyond which their body is not able to cope with the following impacts-

            – The compounded inflammation and immune response the body produces from dealing with several vaccines all at the same time.
            – The aluminum adjuvants added to many vaccines has always been looked at as a possible issue as aluminum is a known neurotoxin. Perhaps one shot with aluminum content can be processed by a baby, but several at a time and administered over several rounds might have more impact than health practicioners realize
            – The variety and nature of foreign substances added to vaccines is a bit scary, even though the amounts may be small..some are industrial style or known harmful ingredients (Triton X-100, mercury, formaldehyde, etc…the list is long).

            Has the FDA adequately tested the impacts directly injecting an infant with these substances have on them or their brain development? No. How about the cocktails of various vaccines from various manufacturers that are administered in one inoculation visit? No. Why not? Well, who would allow for such monstrous testing? And who is going to be in the ‘control group’ to compare against those that are given the vaccines, especially since not vaccinating a baby is seen as anathema?

            So, the entire infant population is the ‘test group’, and people just hope nothing bad is happening to kids. If people can’t directly correlate the issues their kids have with the vaccines (potentially autism or slow mental development….how would they be able to prove it?), and all the health officials say ‘yes they’re safe…just trust us’, who are people going to believe?

            Is this scenario I paint truly happening? Who knows? I’m just saying I’ve seen it myself in person and was personally affected with other drugs (side effects brushed under the table or entirely discounted)…so I don’t doubt the possibility exists in this circumstance. Where there’s smoke….

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 9 months ago

            What do you mean “potentially autism or slow mental development?”

            You are arguing from ignorance and using circular logic to support your positions. What studies have your read and were they peer reviewed and upheld?

            Do you have any evidence to suggest any of the things you suggest are caused by vaccines of introduction of antibiotics? The word potentially that you used is implying a narrative.

            When there is smoke…

            Yes, but you don’t know who started the fire, or the cause. You see smoke then confirmation bias kicks in.

            This is another incomplete statement, with you manufacturing doubt, based on lack of information.

            If you go down the philosophical anything is possible route, then offer other unfounded, unverified, unknown side effects.

            You’re giving the impression you’re an anti vaxxer as you suffer from extreme bias from your own experience. You’re sounding like the Looney I was afraid would be bolstered by your fallacies and dishonesty.

            Your emotion over rational thought is why measles is spreading in the state I reside in. Where people don’t need evidence, but confirmation that something is bad because feelings.

            I’m going to bed…

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            [quote<]What do you mean "potentially autism or slow mental development?" [/quote<] What I mean is that people have reported that their children suffered from those issues only after they were given vaccines. They say their child was behaving and developing completely normally, and all of that changed radically only [b<]after[/b<] they were inoculated. [quote<]...things you suggest are caused by vaccines of introduction of antibiotics?[/quote<] Apologies that I mistakenly said antibiotics instead of vaccines in part of my prior post. I corrected that to clarify things now. My own experience was with antibiotics. I simply feel that the situation could be similar with vaccines (real issues being under-reported and the doctors having contempt for people that tell them the vaccine caused an issue for their child) In any event, of course I suffer extreme bias, silly. As I stated up front as the first line of my first post: 'Obviously, everyone's opinion will be highly colored by their personal experiences'. I feel I was burned by many medical professionals, and their complete close-mindedness to the possibility that one of their drug therapies could be harmful to anyone caused me much trauma. So of course I feel the same potential exists for vaccines, particularly when people report they are having negative impacts on their children. Do I have proof? No. Did I sponsor a comprehensive study? No. But am I an 'anti-vaxxer'? No, I am not. I think not vaccinating children is quite a bad idea and bad for the world. However, I do not blindly trust the medical community that none of their inoculations would ever cause anyone any harm, especially when administered in the conventional manner. I just have the impression that they're probably causing more issues than people realize and sharing my opinion with other people. That's all I'm doing...sharing my opinion and experiences. That does not make me crazy. What I do think is crazy is trusting in absolute terms human beings, their constructs, and that they are infallible.

        • euricog
        • 9 months ago

        [quote<]The “gluten-free” movement is a hipster fad for all but the very very tiny percentage of the populace that actually has an allergy.[/quote<] Careful, although I agree that a significant part of the gluten-free movement is a hipster fad, I can't stress how important it is for us that actually live with Coeliac diseace (such as me). How would you feel if every time you consider eating out it would be like playing russian roulette? Even after asking numerous questions to staff/chefs, the probability of cross-contamination and consequently feeling horrible for the next 2 to 3 weeks is always way too high. Only consolation is that it's not like some other allergies which are life-threatening on contact. Point is, global awareness is essential to provide minimal levels of life quality and security to who has no choice other than avoid gluten at all costs and the gluten-free movement was a godsend to us coeliacs.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 9 months ago

          I am certain that for the ≈0.7% of the population that actually has some sensitivity to wheat, it is very useful to have menu alternatives in restaurants and labels on packaged food. I do not mean to disrespect people with a real medical condition.

          [b<]More than 85%[/b<] of the hipsters who claim to have gluten sensitivity have no such allergy. They're just riding a trend.

            • Redocbew
            • 9 months ago

            I’m sure in some areas that’s true, but I’m not sure how good a predictor the stats are for something like coeliac since so many cases are thought to go undiagnosed.

        • Anovoca
        • 9 months ago

        The true start of the anti-vaccination movement:

        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k5L2yPufoM[/url<]

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 9 months ago

      It’s already a choice here. Measles outbreak in Vancouver area. Bunch of dumb dumbs gave other dumb dumbs the choice to give their kids and other kids polio. Luckily it was only measles this time. Anti vaxxer down voted you, bro.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 months ago

        If you’re referring to Vancouver WA, Washingtonians refer to it as ‘Vantucky’.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 9 months ago

          Interesting. I’ve only been there a few times. I live in Seattle and rarely get down to that area. That’s one more reason to avoid it.

            • BIF
            • 9 months ago

            Communicable disease sure is a pretty good reason to avoid something.

          • Prestige Worldwide
          • 9 months ago

          Sadly, it’s the Canadian Vancouver. You think people here would know better, but we still have some idiots.

          [url<]https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/vaccination-youth-doctors-vancouver-measles-outbreak-1.5027702[/url<]

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 9 months ago

            [url<]https://www.clark.wa.gov/public-health/measles-investigation[/url<] [url<]https://www.columbian.com/news/2019/feb/18/clark-county-measles-outbreak-remains-at-61-cases/[/url<] Let's agree both Vancouvers have some loonies living there.

    • superjawes
    • 9 months ago

    Does this holiday also exclude grain-based liquor like whisk(e)y? If I can’t have my bourbon, it can take a hike!

      • etana
      • 9 months ago

      i thought it implied it would be free, as in beer–also a tasty beverage made with grain.

    • Mr Bill
    • 9 months ago

    I heard about the light saber dueling on NPR yesterday. It sounds intriguing.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 9 months ago

      Hasn’t Kendo been an organized sport for the past 300 years?

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        But fighting with glowsticks is much more rad!

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      I heard that having “the high ground” is banned from competition.

    • Mr Bill
    • 9 months ago

    Whiskey Cheddar? Hmmm, cheddar mixed with red wine I like.

    • willmore
    • 9 months ago

    (Looks down at bowl of frosted shredded wheat)

    Uhhh, what day?

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 9 months ago

      Don’t let them shame your breakfast, bro.

      You gotta fight for your right to… eat grains for breakfast

        • willmore
        • 9 months ago

        I haven’t had shredded wheats for months, but I picked today to do it. *sigh*

    • Krogoth
    • 9 months ago

    Pffft, we liked it when our radio and TV reception was grainy on a good day.

      • BIF
      • 9 months ago

      And making our little brother hold the antenna and stand on one foot with one hand touching the bottom of his foot and his tongue hanging out to the side. Good times!

      …though I hope he forgives us these days!

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