Bang, bang, bang: pull your Devil Trigger with GeForce driver 419.35

Devil May Cry 5 and Tom Clancy's The Division 2 are both really close to release, while Apex Legends is still burning up the player-count charts. I haven't played The Division 2 yet, but both of the others are killer games. Nvidia, never one to rest on its laurels, just released GeForce driver version 419.35 which, by no coincidence, is "Game Ready" for all three of the aforementioned titles.

But seriously guys, Devil May Cry 5 is coming out. So get the driver Nero is pointing at.

The title-specific support for those three games is almost the whole story with this driver release. There are a couple of 3D Vision profiles—Devil May Cry 5 is "not recommended" and Total War: Three Kingdoms is "fair." This driver also adds support for CUDA 10.1, which apparently quadruples performance in cuRAND.

Likely the more interesting news is that this driver marks the first expansions to the G-Sync Compatible monitors listing. Nvidia appended three new displays to the list: Acer's ED273 and XF250Q, as well as BenQ's XL2540. That brings the total number of Nvidia-approved FreeSync displays to a whopping 15. Interestingly, the company didn't update its "400 tested" banner, but that's probably an oversight. You can find the complete list of all officially supported G-Sync displays—whether "compatible" or "classic" G-SYNC—over here.

This guy's standing at the apex of this rocky ridge. What a legend.

Driver version 419.35 fixes up a few issues, too: Apex Legends should stop crashing with DXGI_ERROR_DEVICE_HUNG messages, pixelated corruption in Hitman 2 should be cleaned up, and Batman: Arkham Origins' PhysX fog should render correctly. GeForce RTX cards should be able to play Star Citizen without crashing now, and they also should disperse smoke in Assassin's Creed 4 at the correct speed. Unusually high CPU usage by NVDisplay.container.exe ought to be resolved, and Microsoft Photos may not crash anymore.

Naturally, there are some known issues. The Division 2 may crash when you toggle HDR on or off. Similarly, Far Cry New Dawn might be overexposed if you task switch out of it while playing in HDR mode. ARK: Survival Evolved may crash with a Windows blue screen error. Nvidia's Ansel screenshot tool may not work properly in Shadow of the Romb Raider, which is a shame, because that's a pretty game. Finally, Firefox may briefly corrupt the mouse cursor when you hover over certain links.

You can hit the release notes here. Alternatively, you can go to Nvidia's download site to get the driver—assuming you're not a GeForce Experience user, most of whom have probably already downloaded it by now. Here's a quick link to the Windows 10 64-bit version.

Comments closed
    • The Egg
    • 9 months ago

    Bang bang bang on the door baby
    Knock a little louder sugar

    Bang bang bang on the door baby
    I can’t hear you

      • uwsalt
      • 9 months ago

      Don’t keep saying that it’s alright, it’s alright,
      It seems you went just a little too far this time
      Heard a Bang Bang Bang, and down you go,
      It’s just a job I do,
      ’cause the harder you run the harder you fall,
      I’m coming down hard on you, hard on you.

      I got a name, I got a number, I got a line on you
      I got a name, I got a number, I’m coming after you

    • Rand
    • 9 months ago

    I’d forgotten 3D Vision was even a thing. Does anyone still sell 3D capable monitors anymore?

      • Pwnstar
      • 9 months ago

      I use the Light-boost feature of 3D Vision to improve my 2D performance, so I hope it never goes away.

        • rahulahl
        • 9 months ago

        Isn’t the ULMB from gsync monitors the same thing?

          • RAGEPRO
          • 9 months ago

          It is yeah. Actually even better because the display controller synchronizes the strobes with screen refreshes. You’d think that would be a thing even in Lightboost but over at Blurbusters, many monitors were found to be poorly-calibrated in that regard.

          Lots of other non-G-Sync displays have the same feature—Asus calls it “ELMB”, MSI simply calls it “Blur Reduction”, and Samsung hides it under their “response time” feature, where setting the display to “fast” or “faster” response time dims it visibly because it enables strobing.

          Some other displays have done Black Frame Insertion at 240Hz (120Hz input + 120 black frames), such as EIZO’s FG2421 “Turbo 240” monitor and a couple of LG gaming displays. This accomplishes the same thing with less impact on perceived brightness, although some folks say it’s simply not as good at removing blur. I haven’t used one for very long so I couldn’t say, although in the short time I saw it I thought it looked at least as good as Lightboost on the ASUS VG248QE I was using at the time.

          Blur reduction on my current ASUS XG27VQ is good, although significantly hampered by the VA LCD’s extremely poor response time in dark scenes. The Samsung C24FG70 I had before didn’t have this problem, except that it had a different problem where it broke within days. lol. I made a long thread on the forums talking about it. I hear Samsung has resolved their QA problems with their gaming displays now but given the giant faff I had to go through to get refunded for a monitor I had warranty replaced four times I’m not keen to give them another shot.

            • psuedonymous
            • 9 months ago

            BFI and pulsed backlights (or Low Persistance Driving for VR) are two pretty unrelated techniques.
            LPD or pulsed backlights illuminate the panel for only one or two milliseconds, and for the rest of the time the display is at zero light emissions (as closely as the rise and fall times of the backlight driver can achieve, anyway).
            BFI instead alternates a ‘full persistance’ frame with a ‘black’ frame while keeping the backlight constantly illuminated.

            This means for LPD you get a 1ms/2ms pulse of image per update and the rest is dark, whereas with BFI you get a (for ‘240Hz’, 120FPS actual) 4.2ms of image and then 4.2ms of greyish black. That’s 2x-4x the illumination period so 2x-4x the smear. On top of that, unlike with LPD where you can wait for all pixels to complete switching to the new value before pulsing the backlight, BFI keeps the panel illuminated while the pixels are changing just as with regular full persistence driving.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 9 months ago

            Heh, calling them “unrelated technologies” when they have the same purpose is an interesting choice of words. I’m well aware of the differences in the techniques. The end goal is ultimately the same: reduced motion blur due to LCD image persistence. Thanks for your reply in any case.

          • Pwnstar
          • 9 months ago

          Same thing, different words.

    • DPete27
    • 9 months ago

    Aww wow! It only took Nvidia 2 months to test all the monitor brands that started with “B”!!!

    Multiplied by the square root of my shoe size, minus the age of the statue of liberty in lustrums, carry the 4. Should take them about 27 more months to complete the alphabet and have the full list including every vendor.

    • DancinJack
    • 9 months ago

    DMC owns. Great franchise.

    • Firestarter
    • 9 months ago

    I hope this fixes Apex Legends for real, I had to downgrade to 417.71 to stop it from crashing

      • Pwnstar
      • 9 months ago

      Buy AMD next time.

        • DancinJack
        • 9 months ago

        lol why? For more heat and less performance? yay?

          • Pwnstar
          • 9 months ago

          He’s having worse problems than heat and performance. It’s a valid solution.

            • DancinJack
            • 9 months ago

            a new card, of a different manufacturer, to fix a single game that is supposed to be fixed by this (already released) driver iteration? yeah, super valid solution, mate.

            • Pwnstar
            • 9 months ago

            I didn’t tell him to replace his card right now. I said “next time” pick AMD. Upgrade cycles measure in years these days.

            • Firestarter
            • 9 months ago

            people with AMD cards have similar problems

            • Pwnstar
            • 9 months ago

            Sure, but the problems are fewer in frequency.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      I suspect almost all of issues with Apex stem from memory swapping. The game does not like to dance around with other applications under the same memory pool. It is a probably an aching pain from the dated Source engine. There are similar issues with other Source engine titles to a lesser degree.

        • Waco
        • 9 months ago

        …what? That’s not how virtual memory works.

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          Most of the cases seem to be happening on older systems with less than 8GiB of system memory or people who are multi-tasking between memory demanding applications.

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