Poll: What’s your household’s average daily kWh usage?

A couple months ago, I teased an upcoming story about my brand new solar panel adventure. I'm happy to report that the system has now been up and running for almost a week. And dude, it's kind of blowing my mind. Unfortunately, I'm sorry to say that my full write up is at least a month out. I need more time to collect more data, and sun, before I tell my tale. I can't help but tease a little more, though…

Guess which panels have snow on them. The answer might surprise you.

I'm excited, I'm going to have so much data. All the data. Well, almost all the data… I could actually use your help. I'm looking for the perspective that only fellow gerbils, with their homes purportedly overloaded with PCs and electronics, can provide. So, if you'd be so kind, please take a look at your latest electric bill and estimate how many kWh of juice your home sucks down per day.  A bit of math may be required, but I'm sure that won't be a problem for any of you.

Beyond that, if you'd like to opine in the comments about the breakdown of what constitutes your total draw I'd appreciate that insight as well. That's doubly true if you have any unique or especially significant applications for the power you're consuming. Thanks for sharing and more to come!

Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • wingless
    • 6 months ago

    I live in a 2800sq-ft house in Houston that was built in 1969. I use between 30 and 45kWh/day when the weather is hot. I just put in an 18 SEER A/C unit last year too.

    I really need new insulation, a radiant barrier, and double pane windows.

    • confusedpenguin
    • 8 months ago

    I use enough that I’m surprise the Federal Government hasn’t come knocking on my door.

    • mikepers
    • 8 months ago

    Long Island, NY here. About 3k sq. ft. of living space. Oil for heat and hot water. Propane for heating the pool. Electric for everything else. Two zones of central air. (4 ton, 2 ton) All lights changed over to LED.

    Averaged 62 kWh per day for all of 2018. (Probably worth noting that most of the year there was only one person in the house.)

    Looking at our usage over the years – 2010 was the worst year at 86 kWh per day average. Since then I’ve gotten rid of a lot of the extra computer equipment I had and what’s left is pretty efficient. Also, as mentioned, I’ve replaced all the lights in the house with LED’s over the last several years. So the trend since 2010 has been lower to where it is now.

    Unfortunately electricity on Long Island isn’t cheap so our bill averaged $375 per month for 2018.

      • Waco
      • 8 months ago

      :blink:

      What’s eating all the power? In NY it can’t be AC much of the time, and you have oil for heat/hot water.

      I’ve been tempted to buy one of those AC waveform tracking devices that identifies devices in your home over time to tell you how much each thing uses. Perhaps that’d be something well worth it’s money pretty quickly in your case? (this is the one I keep eyeing: [url<]https://sense.com/)[/url<]

        • mikepers
        • 8 months ago

        Our cost per kWh here is just about 20 cents. (when simply dividing the bill by kWh) In the summer we do get a big jump between the A/C and the pool pump. (May-October)

        One of my neighbors did confirm he’s around the same in usage and bill size.

        I’ve been thinking about putting in something like this to get a better handle on it:

        [url<]https://www.brultech.com/greeneye/[/url<] Though that sense device looks like it's a pretty good option if I don't want to monitor individual circuits.

          • Waco
          • 8 months ago

          Ah, so it’s likely lots of AC. I always forget it actually is pretty warm in NY much of the year.

          Sense doesn’t monitor individual circuits, it monitors your mains. Lots of samples, and lots of characterization to learn what individual loads look like.

          I’m sure it’s not perfect, but eventually they’re supposed to be surprisingly accurate (like finding particular lights left on, particular wall warts in particular outlets, etc). I’m only hesitant because it’s yet another cool gadget that will become mostly a paperweight if the company goes under.

    • tritonus
    • 8 months ago

    Southern Finland here.
    – Climate: Temps between -20 and 90 Fahrenheit, 2-3 months of snow during winter, summer 2-3 months.
    – Townhouse 115 m2, triple-pane insulation, municipal hot-water central heating, electrical A/C during summer. Normal appliances, sauna, one desktop PC, 3 laptops, pads and phones.
    – Family of 4 plus a cat.

    Electricity consumption 9 – 14 kWh per day, surprisingly little variation betw summer / winter. Overall costs about $0,18 / kWh ($50-65/month).

    • Pancake
    • 8 months ago

    I’m appalled by the cavalier use of energy by some folk here – powerful computers running full bore doing stupid tasks like searching for aliens etc…

    Take an obscene example of a fully-loaded overclocked rig running at 500W 24/7. That works out to a daily energy usage of:

    500 x 3600 x 24 = 43,200,000 J

    which is enough energy to lift a 100kg mass

    43,200,000 / 9.8 / 100 = 44, 081m into the air.

    Enough energy to lift a fat man over 40km up in the air. Does that even make any sense? Is that a completely insane thing to do?

    Edit:
    An Olympic sized swimming pool (50x25x2m) contains 2,500,000 litres of water. So this is enough energy to lift all the water in it nearly 2m.

      • Waco
      • 8 months ago

      Or, you know, enough power to charge a Tesla from empty to about 1/7 full. Once.

      It’s all relative.

        • Pancake
        • 8 months ago

        That’s an interesting figure – 12kWh. I’d probably average less mileage per day even considering part time work with my vehicle – I need a light truck. I dump about 20kWh back into the grid every day (and get miserable credit from power utility) so a PHEV light truck like the next gen Mitsubishi Triton could make me about self-sufficient with energy for house and transport. What a time to be alive.

        • just brew it!
        • 8 months ago

        It’s also roughly equivalent (in terms of CO2 emissions) to producing a single 4 oz burger (beef) patty.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 months ago

          now if only we could turn emissions into beef…

            • Shobai
            • 8 months ago

            I know you’re being facetious, but of course it already is. Carbon Dioxide promotes plant growth, and cattle eat grass.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      I run GPU Grid and World Community Grid, bro.

      I agree searching for aliens is a waste of time.

      And you have the right to be appalled. It’s in style to be outaged at everything. More power to you.

        • Pancake
        • 8 months ago

        We should be outraged at the things that still justify outrage. Human induced climate change is the most serious challenge facing us globally. Everybody should be doing their part to reduce energy and resource usage in whatever way possible.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 months ago

          Honestly, your espousing things I doubt you actually believe. Reducing YOUR energy and resource usage is noble. Educating people about the benefits of reducing their usage is noble. Shaming people for their usage, especially without knowing circumstances, is just cruel.

          Is your existence carbon neutral? Do you use utility provided running water? Drive on public streets? Shop in modern stores? Unless you’re living off the land out in the middle of nowhere, AND taking great care to be carbon negative to compensate for the manufacture of everything you possess, you’re not carbon neutral.

            • Pancake
            • 8 months ago

            Depending how you measure the impact of what I do for work as an environmentalist working in rehabilitating wetlands and natural areas, personally planted over a million native plants and coordinating the planting of a whole lot more. Work in environmental planning to reduce native vegetation removal through better planning policies and subdivision design. Design software to support the above and the wide range of activities and processes in managing the environment. Involved with community education – teaching children how to respect and value the environment. So, yeah, probably carbon neutral for the rest of my life many times over.

            But, of course, I live in a society and consume goods and services provided by others. But the point is this: REDUCE consumption. REUSE goods. RECYCLE what no longer has utility.

            I eat meat but have transitioned to a mostly vegetarian lifestyle. Everyone can get started with easy and fun memes like Meat-free Mondays. Discover how delicious and interesting vegetarian food is. Connect with your food by growing some of it.

            But back to energy. Admire low energy usage devices and ways to do things. Make that a real buying point of any energy consuming device. Practice hypermiling – it’s fun to see how far your fuel can take you. Think about whether you need a light or device on in the house. Put on some more clothes if it’s getting colder.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            Well, you certainly do more than the average person. Probably even a lot more than the average “activist”. Thanks for that. I applaud that kind of commitment and sacrifice.

            Sorry if my initial post came off as hostile, just not a fan of when the outrage comes with a dose of shaming as well. It’s unfortunate that we just don’t have much influence over corporate and public decisions made that affect the consumption of large portions of the population. Even after minimizing what they can, many people just don’t have much choice in significant parts of their impact. When people know so much of it is out of their control, when they get shamed about it they’ll often have a hostile reaction. But, the more people are educated about these issues and concepts, the more people will make what changes they can and also start to vote with their wallets and on their ballots for improving those high impact decisions. So keep the tips and education going, but keep that shaming to a minimum.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        srsly replied to the wrong comment, bro.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 8 months ago

          All good bro. Getting these nerds right where I want them.

      • BIF
      • 8 months ago

      I try very hard not to judge other people for how much energy they use. It’s not my place. Even if I don’t tell them what to do, that kind of judgment is nothing but toxic, and is even more damaging to the open nature of the Techreport articles and forums. I won’t play that game.

      Well, unless I am being made to pay for the other person’s stuff, which I am to some extent in my locality. And that’s when I’ll get up in your grill about it.

      Otherwise, leaving each other alone may very well be the most loving thing we’ll engage in together.

      Side story: just a few days ago, somebody wanted me to pick up some litter on the side of the road. It wasn’t mine, and I didn’t litter it. And it was filthy. The other guy got very angry with me when I didn’t bow down to his sensitiveness about litter. That’s his penchant to worry about litter. It doesn’t have to be my passion just because he wants it to be.

        • Pancake
        • 8 months ago

        That’s fair enough. You may live in a very libertarian society where people can do what they like.

        In contrast, I live in a moderately socialist society where you are assessed on your deviancy from societal norms and judged accordingly by “the institutions” but more generally by other citizens. It encourages good behaviour and leads to an easier transition to improved ways of living (recycling etc).

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 8 months ago

      The facility that I work at draws over ¼ TW from the grid. Can we get send the fat man to Mars?

      • Shobai
      • 8 months ago

      What makes you think he’s fat?

      I mean, you’ve seen pics of Arnie in his Mr Universe prime, right? If memory serves he was around 107 kg for contests, which puts his BMI up around 30. Just how much fat do you think he was running?

      Perhaps you meant to use “heavy” ?

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 8 months ago

        “Massive.” When we get up beyond 40+ km, we probably need to start thinking about distance between the centers of the masses in Newton’s law of universal gravitation, F = G · m1 · m2 ÷ r² as integrating through the change in the denominator can become significant.

          • Redocbew
          • 8 months ago

          That’s true. I’m not that far from 220lbs myself. Away from the gravity of the earth my weight would change rather quickly, but a change in mass would happen more slowly.

    • Ummagumma
    • 8 months ago

    Low: 20 kWh per day
    High: 80 kWh per day

    A/C during 5 months of year. Gas for heat, cooking, and clothes dryer.

    Waiting to see usage data for this year after replacing A/C equipment with higher SEER unit and adding to roof insulation.

    Other thoughts:

    This poll really needs to be separated by summer-time and winter-time in order to be useful / informative.

    I wish my electric company posted a running 12 month total of my usage on my electric bill so I could quickly calculate a running daily average. No, I am not going to get all A/R and start recording the data from these bills into a database “just so I can run the numbers”; that takes a lot of the “c’est la vie” out of life.

    • dragmor
    • 8 months ago

    Daily average of 18 kWh in Summer, 13 kWh in winter. The 4 person house hold uses ~11kWh and the rest is the pool pump which runs longer in summer. No Solar yet.

    I’m in Australia so a more temperate climate than the USA. Summer high of 43c, winter daytime low of 12c. So no AC, but we have a portable gas heater for winter and the hot water is on instant gas.

    Our bill shows that we are in the middle of the Australian average for a 4 person and a 5 person household. The power is expensive, our last bill (92 days) was $520. We pay $0.289 per kWh and $0.84 per day for connection. We then get a small discount for paying on time.

    Last year I put 14.5 KW of solar on 4 of my properties. 5.5kW on my parents house and 3x3kW on some rental properties. All with Fronius inverters and Jinko panels. My parent’s bills so far sum to -$93 and their solar has produced 6700kW+ since mid May last year. The tenants also seem happy but obviously I don’t have their consumption or billing details.

    I will put 12kW of panels on my house once the we put on a new roof. However the output will be low due to the lack of north facing roof. It will probably be 2kW north, 6kW east, 4kW west with micro inverters. I’d like to put in a battery as well, but the cost currently makes it unlikely.

    • astrotech66
    • 8 months ago

    We have solar panels that cover about 90% of our electricity bill, on average. During the summer here in Texas, our electricity usage is effectively zero, which is awesome. We still have to pay fees and stuff, so the monthly bills are about $25 instead of the $200-$300 we’d be paying without the solar panels. The only annoyance is that no matter how much electricity the panels generate, the amount we can “sell back” to the power company is capped at $7.50 per month.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 8 months ago

      That’s pretty impressive. In Oregon, at least in the valley, I don’t think I’d have a reasonable roi on panels. I only go over $100 two months a year. It’s cold enough the rest of the year that it doesn’t matter. How much was your installation?

      • cygnus1
      • 8 months ago

      That sucks about the sell back cap. I’ve watched some youtube videos about people coming up with pretty creative uses for their excess peak solar generation. It would definitely be cool to find something productive (productive for you instead of the power company) to do with the power besides pipe it back into a grid that’s not paying you.

      Even power companies do basically the same thing because turning off generators for only a few hours can be more expensive than leaving them on. I’ve seen a local power company that also is the biggest local ice producer. Basically at times of very low power demand, like middle of the night on a cool night, the power company itself would fire up giant ice makers to make use of their excess power.

      Might be worthwhile to look at some way to automate turning *something* on to soak up your excess solar generation.

    • farmpuma
    • 8 months ago

    For the period of Jan 04 to Feb 02 the average was 115 kwh. From Jan 19 to Feb 02 the usage exceeded 115 kwh everyday with a peak of 137 kwh. Total usage for the thirty day period was 3448 kwh. I expect the bill this month to be similar. This is considerably higher than this time last year.

    Primary usage is by five oil filled convection radiators at 750 to 900 watts, one ceramic convection radiator at 750 watts, one maybe 400 watt barnyard light 24/7 due to failure of the dawn to dusk feature, and one 24/7 A64x2 folding computer at ~180 watts IIRC.

    Lighting is mostly LED except for four CFLs I’m trying to kill and a 22 watt halo magnifier I’m running for extra heat.

    Last summers monthly usage for June through Oct was 1149 kwh or slightly less for an 8000 BTU and a 5500 BTU window AC units.

    Edit: For the period Feb 03 to March 05 the daily average was 118 kwh on a total of 3526 kwh.

    Edit2: For the calender year 2018 the daily average was 68.4 kwh. From April 2018 to March 2019 it was 71.3 kwh.

    • atcrank
    • 8 months ago

    I’m from Melbourne, Australia. Climate is pretty temperate though its up over 100F fairly often in summer. Doesn’t freeze in winter, but the house is from the 60s, has a little insulation in the roof, none in the walls, and the windows are large, metal framed 3mm glass. We’ve got 5kW of solar panels (20 panels). The question of when you use the power vs when its being generated is really important for solar systems. Using the panels to run the aircon in summer is a very good deal, but most of the time we’re all out during peak generating time. Our usage outside heating and cooling is under 15kW although its creeping up as I keep finding more gadgets to smuggle in. A battery would make a lot of sense; some smart home features to run the aircon to heat or cool if there’s good sunlight might also work.

    • Beltonius
    • 8 months ago

    Eastern PA, USA. ~1400sqft house from the 1970’s. Double-paned windows but low on attic insulation.

    SEER16 AC, gas heat, gas hot water, electric laundry.

    Dimmers on all the lights but no LED bulbs

    No electric cars or solar.

    26 kWh/day average across the year

    • Waco
    • 8 months ago

    16-30 kWh daily, generally on the lower end. Spikes in summer (A/C running) and winter (heaters to keep the canales from freezing).

    PCs are only on when we used them except the NAS and HTPC. Gas heat.

    EDIT: Big house (4000 sq feet or so), high altitude (7500 feet), but lots of solar. I’d like to think we’re technologically up to date but our usage clearly pales in comparison to many here. I get cranky when we break the 1000 kWh range in the summer once or twice when it’s super hot. If you take out air conditioning and electric heat, what do your electronics use? We sit at ~300 watts 24/7 for always on electronics from my estimates (7 kWh per day).

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 months ago

      lol get cranky when break 1MW.hr

      I usually break that in the winter dec, jan, feb. sometimes Nov and Feb flip depending on weather.

      It’s when it goes below -18C and the vehicles block heaters kick in, I have them on a timer for 3-4 hrs each. One is about 450W and the other is about 750W.

      One month almost hit 1.3MW.hr lol

        • Waco
        • 8 months ago

        Yeah, we jump up to roughly that number with the AC cranking mid-summer. In winter we very rarely break .5 MWh.

        It does put things into perspective…my datacenter (one of them) at work runs roughly 1 million kWh per day. That’s roughly 50,000 times my daily usage. Made me chuckle a bit. 🙂

        • Gastec
        • 7 months ago

        Can you elaborate on that 1.3 MWh please? Are you Bill Gates living in a mansion?

    • bhtooefr
    • 8 months ago

    20.8 kWh per day for the past year, looking at my last electric bill (covering usage from January into February).

    The February bill tends to be the worst – 35.5 kWh usage per day on that bill – due to baseboard electric heat (and computers providing heat too).

    August’s bill, interestingly, was the lowest, at 13.2 kWh per day. Then again, my apartment naturally stays pretty cool, so AC doesn’t get used all that much.

    • fredsnotdead
    • 8 months ago

    Average of 36 kWh per day over the last 12 months. Biggest single use is undoubtedly the geothermal heating & cooling system, although the lowest months, when the geothermal is shut down, are still > 1/2 the highest months. Highest usage is in the winter. Don’t run any servers or desktops 24/7. Electrical generation cost is US$0.0778/kWh.

    • Aranarth
    • 8 months ago

    pffttt!!! lol!!!

    um… I can probably figure it out but I heat and cool by geothermal so you need to take my numbers with a massive chunk of salt.

    Summer numbers are pretty good but winter numbers a terrible because the house really needs to the wrapped and the attic needs to be sealed and the insulation redone to properly deal with winter weather.

      • Aranarth
      • 8 months ago

      So I checked the latest bill for feb-15 to mar-15 we used an average of 67kwh.

      We use the least in late spring to early summer and late summer to early fall where our usage drops down to about 25-35kwh.

      In winter we can go as high 70kwh per day.

      I should give more details I suppose…

      1860 sqfoot single story capecod type modular home with about the same size of basement.
      Basement is not fully finished but it is insulated on all exterior walls except for the utility room which mostly buried behind 6ft of ground. Rim joist is insulated all the way around. (2×6 construction)

      Basement floor is not insulated as such but does have wood flooring over a plastic dimpled sub floor (over cement).

      Geothermal system is an open loop system which is fed by 6″ well (same well we use for regular water usage). Well provides Geothermal system about 58F water and uses about 8gal/minute (@ 60psi).

      Dryer, and range is gas. Water heater is a tankless rinai. All gas is propane instead of natural gas. Takes us about 4-5 months to use 300gal where we need to refil the 500gal tank. (tank is filled to 80 to 85% to be considered “full”)

      Last bill was $400 (where we average 67kwh/day) I would say our base usage without the need for heat or cooling is about $150 – $175. This puts cost of heating at around $250/mo for the winter months.

    • pandelta
    • 8 months ago

    I have averaged 67 kWh a day for the past year. I run higher than most people despite 6 inch walls and high efficiency windows because I got 4 machines running 24/7 @ 100%. I have contributed to the World Community Grid to help find cures for diseases for nearly 7 years now.

    I am running two servers and two workstations. They use so much power that they help heat the house. 🙂

    For those that might be interesting in joining and getting surveys from the power company wanting to know why you use so much power (true story) you can find more info about the IBM sponsored project here:
    [url<]https://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/[/url<]

    • BIF
    • 8 months ago

    Central Florida here. For 1300 square feet under air, I keep the AC at 79 F and try to program the system to go to 83 on days I am gone during the hottest part of the year. I also have tankless hot water, and run an average of 3 loads of laundry each month and about 6 to 8 loads of dishes. In the winter I cook about 2 times each week with the stove and range; in the summer, not so much.

    I do have single-pane glass, but not a lot of it faces the sun, so I haven’t prioritized a complete replacement as yet. Thinking of doing it this year, though; and maybe having hurricane shutters added, along with built-in screens. ‘spensive, yes.

    Duke Energy charges me 7.633 cents per KWH up to 1000, and 9.25 cents per KWH over 1000. They also charge .25 cents per KWH for something called an “Asset Securitization Charge”, and that’s for every KWH; not pro-rated in any way.

    ~1300 KWH in months November thru May inclusive; lower if I am travelling
    ~1700 KWH in months June thru September Inclusive
    ~1800 KWH in October when I was folding more for Frankie

    So I’m averaging around 60 KWH per day in the hottest summer months and closer to 40-50 in the cooler winter.

      • Pancake
      • 8 months ago

      Mild Mediterranean climate checking in. 6 kWh daily usage although that may be on the high side as I’ve been into making cakes and pastries. 2000 sqft house with no AC, gas heating (only used when sick in winter). The suburb average is 12kWh/day. Mostly detached houses 1500-2500 sqft around here.

      Mind totally blown by people using 50+kW in other parts of the world.

        • BIF
        • 8 months ago

        No AC and no electric heat usage is a major reason your usage is so low. And if you’re on a coast, it’s probably even cooler yet. I live inland.

        Also, when I work from home, usage rises during those days; especially if it is during the hot summer months, and even moreso if I am Folding@Home. All of that comes with a cost. But that’s balanced by less gasoline usage (often near or at zero), and a lower risk from NOT having to be on the roads that day.

        When I bought my home, I specifically looked for one that did not have a 2nd floor. Here in Florida, 2nd floor rooms always feel hot, even in homes that have two AC units (one for each floor).

    • Taxythingy
    • 8 months ago

    130m^2 house, single pane glazing and far too much glass in main living area, otherwise insulated well. 1x Nissan Leaf EV, gas water heating, wood burner and 2 heat pumps/AC. -5 to 15 degrees in winter (25-50F), 15 to 32 degrees in summer (50-90F). 1x VM server and 1x small NAS. Partner works from home; family of 5.

    12,000 kWh / annum.
    1,000 kWh / month average; 550-600 mid-summer, 1,500 mid-winter.
    33 kWh / day; 12 kWh summer low to 50 kWh high, estimate 100 kWh mid-winter high.
    0.4 kWh base hourly load (VMs, NAS, fridge, freezer).

    Would love to double glaze, but there’s unfortunate market value issues to doing that.
    Would love solar, but roof not oriented well at all. Also has market value issues.

    • SecretSquirrel
    • 8 months ago

    Over the last year:

    Min: 26kWh/day
    Max: 155kWh/day
    Average: 63.72kWh/day
    Median: 49kWh/day

    I live in the Dallas/Ft Worth area in a large (~3800 sq/ft) house with dual zone AC. Heat, hot water, and stove top are natural gas. Dryer is electric. All lighting in the house is mainly LED, with a few fluorescent her and there. Last June generated the top seven consumption days for the year. Yay Texas heat!

    For computers, there are three that will contribute to the majority of the computer power consumption:

    File server averages 4.2kWh/day
    VM server averages 3.58kWh/day
    My workstation averages 3.44kWh/day

    So those three computers make up 43% of the baseline load of my house.

    • RdVi
    • 8 months ago

    I’ve got Solaredge system also (can tell what it is from the UI), almost 2 years old now but it’s one of the newer HD wave model inverters. 5kW inverter, 5.5kW of panels. 290w REC panels all facing NE close to Brisbane Australia (north is like your south down here in the southern hemisphere).

    Average daily generation is 24kWh, our use at night is around 4.5kWh in a 2 person household with no AC/heating – we live in a warmish climate but have a new decently insulated/designed house and also can put up with slight discomfort more than a lot of people. Output to the grid is somewhere around 15-17kWh average per day which we get paid well for at the moment, 20c per kWh and 28c for every kWh consumed. We get a credit of $100-150 every quarter. That coupled with our old bills being $350 -$400 means a saving of $2000 or so a year, so the system will be paid off in another 2 years at this rate.

    • Ifalna
    • 8 months ago

    Weird question that leads to rather useless data but here goes:

    ~1.5K kWh / a = > ~ 4 kWh / d
    I live in a 20m² one room apartment, heating is not factored in, this is purely electrical energy.
    I pay around 40€ per Month for electricity.

      • Yan
      • 8 months ago

      20 m[super<]2[/super<]? That's small!

    • ludi
    • 8 months ago

    Winter heat in our townhome is piped gas, and the summer has a non-trivial A/C load, but since my wife gets cabin fever in the winter and bakes a lot using an electric oven, we tend to average 15-20kWh/day regardless of season.

    Edit: month, not day. Straight off my recent monthly electric bills.

    • Kougar
    • 8 months ago

    You absolutely need to differentiate between times of year.

    Last August, ~82kWh per day. Last month ~24kWh per day. Entire difference was from central AC. According to the bill it’s around 50kWh averaged across one entire year.

    • Geonerd
    • 8 months ago

    Tucson, 100% electric. This year’s brutal winter pushed Feb consumption to a record ~600kWH, about 20 per day. (Direct resistive heat is a lot less efficient than the A/C that keeps us alive in the summer.) Daily use drops to 5~6 during the spring and fall, and my yearly average is probably a hair under 10 per day.

    • BryanC
    • 8 months ago

    65 kWh/day. 1700 square foot house, gas heating, but two electric cars. We also have 8 kW of solar on the roof and a 15 kWh house battery.

    • Wirko
    • 8 months ago

    Fish, you may as well tell us where the snow was. Seems like no one is willing to risk and guess.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      Spoiler, it might also [i<]not[/i<] surprise you. 😉

        • Redocbew
        • 8 months ago

        OMG CLICKBAIT SO SAD

          • drfish
          • 8 months ago

          LOL. Ok, I’ll come clean. A little bit of snow is actually not a complete show stopper.

          The panels on the bottom of the image had a couple inches on them, but some of the darker ones on the top were still producing power with a decent dusting that hadn’t melted/blown off yet.

    • kleinwl
    • 8 months ago

    Yes, you need to add a breakout for summer/winter load as well if gas is a significant fraction of total consumption. At least out here in California, my electrical charges can spike to $0.41/kwh during peak hours (4-9 p.m.) (Switching to Time of Use billing is mandatory). So, we do all sorts of things to time shift as well as reduce consumption overall. I want to switch from gas heat to a heat pump, but I’m worried that the electrical rates will make it a significant reoccurring cost.

      • e1jones
      • 8 months ago

      I’m in SoCal and have solar already, so I’m delayed being forced to ToU. Which is just a PUC approved scam to screw everyone for more money. I’d prefer to get a household battery system before I get pushed to ToU… summer AC ain’t no joke!

    • gerryg
    • 8 months ago

    Can’t vote, no time! Hard enough to find the seconds to reach into the mini-fridge under my desk for a soda while playing Apex Legends on my dual-graphics Threadripper gaming rig and listening to big game on my 100-inch big-screen TV and sitting in my air conditioned mansion. I really should go unplug my laptop, tablet, phone, fitbit, Apple Watch, they’re probably all charged. Oh, I know [turns toward Google home device] – “Hey Google, set a reminder to unplug my portable devices this evening”. Oh man, the mini-fridge is out of soda! I know the kitchen fridge is empty, too, so I’ll have to check the fridge in the garage. It’s next to my Tesla charging station. I actually have two. Teslas. And charging stations. I always keep the spare charging in case I forget to charge the other one. I should probably pull up my smart home surveillance system and check the three cameras in the garage to make sure my Tesla is charging. Man, all this responsibility is tough.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 8 months ago

    Based on what we pay and a guess at the rate, I’m saying about 60 kWh peak during the summer and 20 in the winter. AC is huge. This is with fairly active household of 4 with above average cooking and showers and electric clothes dryer.

    • Air
    • 8 months ago

    The avarage on the month i consumed the most energy (summer, AC on, 30 degrees outside) last year was 7,5 kWh/day. I guess that must be the avarage for a household that does not do much outside of the ordinary.

    • Ochadd
    • 8 months ago

    3200 sq ft single level home in South Dakota. 3200 kWh a month in the winter.

    High Usage:
    3,456
    Low Usage:
    688
    Average Usage:
    1,822.14
    Total Usage:
    25,510

    • rayleech
    • 8 months ago

    My offices, including a datacenter, are attached to my tech-heavy home. Average is currently around 34kw/dy. We dropped over 25kw/dy by replacing a lot of old equipment with more energy-saving equipment in a technology refresh last year.

    We also have a 15kw solar array, which offsets around 8 months of electric bills each year when the weather is favorable!

    Best of luck on your solar farm!

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 8 months ago

    1865 square foot split level house.

    77.7 kWh/day annual average with cold winters and hot, humid summers in Montreal. Lots of use of heat pump, central AC, some furnace use. House heated 100% electric, but not baseboard. Probably a bit higher than it should be because our heat pump conked out for a few weeks during an intense cold period, meaning we were using furnace 100% of the time for a while during a cold snap in December which makes for a lot of power consumption.

    – A lot of washer / dryer use with young kids. Laundry done every couple of days.
    – 2 adult showers / day, 2 baths for the kids.
    – House built in 1950s, definitely could benefit from better insulation and sealing.
    – Usually don’t let the PC idle, but do work from home 2-3 days / week where I’ll be using my laptop, desktop, and 2 monitors.
    – A few hours of a TV being on most days

    Would love to go solar, but feel I should replace the roof first, and that’s pretty low on my priority list. Would want to reno a bathroom, kitchen, and maybe garage first.

      • e1jones
      • 8 months ago

      That’s a lot, but the bigger question is how much each kWh costs you. My ‘baseline’ first ~300 kWh per month are currently $.21-.24 USD/kWh, everything above that is ~$.40-.45/kWh.

      My solar PPA is $.17x/kWh currently, and provides ~10k kWh/year, which has more or less cut our power bill in half. We’ve mildly exported annually the last couple years, so the power company only gets it’s minimum connection fees, essentially.

      Thankfully the central heater and water heater are gas… and I wish the dryer were too.

        • Prestige Worldwide
        • 8 months ago

        Fixed charge per day: 40.64¢ (Canadian)
        First 36 (kWh): 5.91¢/kWh
        Remaining daily use above 36 kWh: 9.12¢/kWh

        [url<]http://www.hydroquebec.com/residential/customer-space/rates/rate-d.html[/url<] From what I understand, we have some of the lowest rates in the world. We have a nationalized / provincially-owned electricity monopoly and an abundance of hydroelectricity sources and are even able to sell to adjacent provinces and even some US states. Thanks socialism! 😀

          • Wirko
          • 8 months ago

          Can you sell AC across the border? The [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-phase_electric_power#Color_codes<]wire colours[/url<] are highly incompatible. DC is easier, it's probably black and red everywhere.

            • ludi
            • 8 months ago

            What do you mean? Canadian voltages, frequency, and wire colors are pretty much 100% compatible with NEC standards used in the US, and in any case, that’s only to get the power through the inverter. Once it’s on the grid in Canada, it’s just going to pool into one of the four principle grids that connect into Canada (Western, Eastern, Quebec, or Alaska).

            [url<]https://www.energy.gov/oe/services/electricity-policy-coordination-and-implementation/transmission-planning/recovery-act-0[/url<]

            • anotherengineer
            • 8 months ago

            There are typically no colors on high voltage transmission lines.

            Also, Quebec provides a lot of power to NY/New England
            [url<]http://www.hydroquebec.com/international/en/exports/markets/new-york.html[/url<] [url<]http://www.hydroquebec.com/international/en/exports/markets/new-england.html[/url<] and expanding North America is typically same frequency and voltage lines. Quebec does have DC lines, however they are typically used due to the long distances from the hydro plants to the end substation, you don't get stray inductance and capacitance losses over the lines with DC. Once it's converted back to AC, you can put it on other AC grids that are not synchronized with the source generators/other grids.

          • e1jones
          • 8 months ago

          Wow… those prices make me sad. At those prices, solar is about the last thing you’d want to spend money on…. unless you know massive price increases are coming.

          Maybe some extra energy efficiency measure… wow.

          • MOSFET
          • 8 months ago

          Yall are apparently manic about hydro.

    • Ben54
    • 8 months ago

    According to my SunPower app, in 2018 we averaged about 26 KWh/Day with summertime peaks near 45 KWh due to central air conditioning. Our 27 or so solar panels provided 95% of our power resulting in an annual power bill in 2018 of about $100. That’s in Massachusetts with Eversource power at about $0.22 / KHw.

    Solar power rocks, even reasonably far north like Massachusetts.

    Massachusetts mandates power utilities provide some renewable power sources so the power companies pay me about $250 for every megawatt of power I generate. That paid us about $2000 last year. So, between the initial solar tax credit, utility savings, and these generation credits, my system will pay for itself in 6 years.

    • excession
    • 8 months ago

    I’m in the UK. I heat a fairly large home (for the UK) with gas, and have an electric car.

    From 28/12/18 to 27/1/19 I used an average of 21 kWh/day of electricity and 83 kWh/day of gas.

    Gas is cheap!

    • Zizy
    • 8 months ago

    I don’t have even monthly average yet, but yesterday’s consumption was about 25 kWh for the heat pump (heating of house and water) and about 10 kWh for the rest. I expect consumption to go down a lot for today, as I raised temperature yesterday and the pump needed to make the difference.

    • mephisto
    • 8 months ago

    Yearly average 26 kWh/day, monthly averages range from 15 kWh/day in summer (May-Sep) to 40+ kWh/day in winter (Nov-March). The difference between summer and winter is almost entirely due to electric heating, which is the only form of heating in my home. We don’t have air conditioning. (I’m in Scandinavia, a couple of hot days once every few years makes air conditioning a poor return on investment.)

    Running PCs etc. makes little to no difference during winter, since PC power is all heat and a kWh spent on computing is a kWh saved on other forms of electric heating. But it makes a noticable difference in the summer, especially if it’s running Folding@home or similar 24/7.

    I bought an electric car last year, it’s around 5 kWh/day in weekly average, so about 10% of my winter usage and 30% of the summer usage. (Also an electric bicycle, but the consumption there is practically zero – 0.07 kWh/day in the summer if I use it for one battery charge per week.)

    The rest is miscellaneous standard items: Lighting, TV, washing machine, electric stove, fridge, etc.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 8 months ago

      The same, but opposite. I live in Texas, so winter is cheap and summer is expensive from a electricity standpoint.

    • notfred
    • 8 months ago

    I’m doing 23-31kWh per day and that includes my electric car, a 2016 Kia Soul EV that’s always charged (and preheated / cooled) at home only. We’re a family of 4 in Ottawa, Canada with gas heating and central air conditioning.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 8 months ago

    My PC runs 24/7 at around .5kwh. you do the math, bro

      • cygnus1
      • 8 months ago

      .5kwh / 24 hours = about 20W. That’s pretty low, seriously bro

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 8 months ago

        You sure, bro?

          • cygnus1
          • 8 months ago

          Nope, one of us definitely has units mixed up and I’m not EE or anything so… ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 8 months ago

            The unit is fine. I didn’t specify duration. I said do the math, bro. I forgot to say do the reasoning. I can do that if you’d prefer.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            Sure, do the reasoning. Because you said kwh, but phrased it as if it were a rate and that unit is not a rate.

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 8 months ago

      edit : misread the comment, ignore.

      • ronch
      • 8 months ago

      500w x 24 ÷ 1000 x 30 = 360 kwh/month.

        • cygnus1
        • 8 months ago

        kWh is not a unit of time, nor does it imply one. Running 24/7 is the same as saying running constantly, it doesn’t give you a unit of time. Therefore this wrongly makes the assumption that the PC is using .5kwh per hour. If it had said alarm clock or LED light instead of PC the sentence would still give you the same amount of info but you wouldn’t make the assumption you did because the power usage wouldn’t even remotely make sense for 1 hour.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 months ago

          Think of it in this example instead. My sink leaks constantly at around 500,000 gallons. I just gave you the same amount of info about that as Srsly_bro gave about the PC power consumption. How fast is that leak?

          • ludi
          • 8 months ago

          In fact, “kWh” contains two units of time, since 1 W expresses a rate of 1J/s, and 1 Wh specifies that the load has been operating at that rate for 1 hour. Srsly_Bro used the terminology atypically but he gave enough information for us to conclude that his PC is always on and continuously using 500W.

          In your counter example with the leaky faucet, you gave no unit of time whatsoever.

          Throw as many soldiers at that hill as you like, but Ronch got the concept and the math right.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            You’re wrong and you don’t understand the unit.

            [url<]https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilowatt_hour[/url<]

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            And neither did Ronch because, again, no unit of time was provided. You cannot deduce the rate without some unit of time. 24/7 is not a unit of time, it is an expression meaning constantly on.

            • ludi
            • 8 months ago

            More soldiers, please.

            This stuff is my day job, by the way. If I didn’t understand it I wouldn’t get paid. And yes, I understand the term is used in metering to designate a quantity of energy, but since it is derived from a specified load operating for a specified unit if time, it can be misused the way Srsly misused it and everyone can still figure out what he meant.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            That’s my point, it is absolutely misused, Srsly misused it, and NO you can’t figure out what he meant without making an assumption. For his statement to be at all useful you HAVE to assume he meant the power he stated was used was used over the course of 1 hour, but only because you know the term is misused and you know 500W is not an entirely unreasonable power consumption for a PC under load(although I would say it is unreasonable unless you’re running GPU benchmarks on a loop 24/7). But change that example to a toaster or a single LED light or anything that normally uses a lot more or a lot less power than a PC and it no longer makes sense. If I change his example to “My Central AC runs 24/7 at around .5kwh”, it’s still on ok statement. It’s not wrong because I didn’t tell you how long that AC was running. But you and I both know the AC does not consume power at 500W.

            Because the unit is derived or reduced from a rate multiplied by a time, the time component is lost entirely. See:

            1W = 1J/s (as you pointed out)

            1kWh = 1kW x 1 hour

            1kWh = 1kJ/s x 1 hour

            1kWh = 1kJ/s x 3600s

            1kWh = 3600 kJ

            That is why 1 kWh = 3.6 megajoules. That’s why kWh is a unit of energy. It is not a rate of energy consumption and it includes no component of time. From a simple math perspective, since that is a fully reduced equation/equivalence, if there’s no time component on the right side, then there cannot be a time component on the left side.

            I think you get it, but you’re just allowing for the assumption that Srsly is forcing. It’s a bad assumption and assumptions in power is how people get dead.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 8 months ago

            Things got Srsly Srs

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            From your link:

            “If energy is transmitted or used at a constant rate (power) over a period of time, the total energy in kilowatt hours is equal to the power in kilowatts multiplied by the time in hours.”

            Power in kilowatts = 0.5kW
            Time in hours = 24 hours x 30 days = 720 hours

            So.. 0.5kW x 720 hours = 360

            Pretty much how I did it.

            PS – and yes there is a time component there, as your link clearly states.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            No, there is not a time component in kWh. To calculate kWh yes, there is. But once it is calculated, the time component is lost. kWh is a unit of energy. It is not a rate. You cannot work it backwards and they are not interchangeable as you seem to think. Just be quiet now, you’ve thoroughly proved you don’t understand energy.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 8 months ago

            If little Johnny used 10kWh over 10 hours, how much Watt-hours did little Johnny used on average per hour?

            Are you telling me this is unsolvable?

            Bro…

            10 hours * 1000W = 10kWh

            10kWh/1000 = ????

            Am I getting it now, bro????

            • Aistic
            • 8 months ago

            > My PC runs 24/7 at around .5kwh

            > If little Johnny used 10kWh over 10 hours

            So your PC is 20W?

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 8 months ago

            If he meant that his PC runs 24 hrs/day x 7 days and consumes 0.5 kWh in that period, we could figure out that his PC draws 3 watts. That seems exceptionally low to me.

            • Waco
            • 8 months ago

            Using the same logic you applied here, your PC uses 20 watts average.

            Just admit your mistake and be done, bro. This is embarrassing.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            So, no, you’re not getting it. Do you not understand how that example is actually wildly different than your original post? Here you’re giving us a duration, 10 hours. In your original post you did not give that. You left it to be guessed and then got snippy when someone guessed.

            Also, even this example is moronic.

            [quote<]10 hours * 1000W = 10kWh 10kWh/1000 = ????[/quote<] Why do you drop units? Why are you dividing by 1000? That would get you MEGA Watt hours, not Watt hours like you asked. To get to Wh, you would multiply by 1000. [quote="Srsly_bro"<]Am I getting it now, bro????[/quote<] NO, you're really not. You're digging yourself deeper and deeper into a hole of ignorance.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            Since your conviction that you’re right and we don’t know anything about power and you’re getting angry, you win then, Mr. Power Xpert! [b<]CONGRATULATIONS!!![/b<] 😀 How to be you, brother?? 🙂

            • Waco
            • 8 months ago

            Um, he is right. He’s proven that a few times over now.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            Yeah. I know.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            Damn, did I get suckered by trolling again? lol, if so, good work

            • Redocbew
            • 8 months ago

            It’s like measuring dimensional lumber in board feet. A person saying they have 500 board feet of lumber could mean they have one board that’s one foot wide, one inch thick, and 500 feet long, but that’s probably not accurate. There’s a piece missing which the unit doesn’t tell you. It’s a unit of volume for measuring absolute quantity and not a measure of distance.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 8 months ago

            Now they’re just down voting you because you made them look silly for figuring it out right away. Don’t let the nerds bully you; they’ll just pull your hair a little and scratch.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            Making the same idiotic assumption is not the same as “getting it” if it makes you both look like dumb.

          • ronch
          • 8 months ago

          I based this calculation on the data he provided. KWh is not a unit of time but a unit of electricity consumption over a period of time.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            But that’s the thing, in isolation that’s not what kWh is. It’s a unit of energy that is just easy to calculate from power consumption rate and a length of time. But once that’s calculated, you can’t work it backwards without one of those original numbers. The original information is lost in the calculation.

            Think about it, if I tell you my pc used 1.8 mega joules, do you know how long it was running or how many W it was using? No, you’d say you need more info. But I just told you the same thing as it using .5 kWh.

            The calculation is like a hash, you just can’t work it backwards into its original values. If you make terrible assumptions you might get lucky, but that’s still pulling numbers out of your arse.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            You’re making this unnecessarily complicated. He said his computer eats 500w and is running 24 hours a day. If this were a question in an exam and it’s asking how much electricity the computer consumes over a 30-day period, that’s pretty much it.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            kWh is not the same thing as KW. Get over it dude. You don’t understand energy, it’s ok.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            No need to be derogatory, dude. Yes I’m no expert but I know kW is not the same as kWh. kWh is 1,000 watts being pulled for an hour. I also agree that 0.5kWh is NOT 500w. However, anyone with half a brain can easily put together what he’s saying in his original post. When I saw 0.5kWh I automatically understood that his PC sucks 500w.

            • Redocbew
            • 8 months ago

            [quote<]kWh is 1,000 watts being pulled for an hour.[/quote<] Not necessarily, and that's the whole point. It could be 500 watts for 2 hours, or 50 watts for 20 hours. All three of those power usages would be equivalent to one kilowatt hour. That's why the statement is ambiguous. Implying continuous usage doesn't really change anything. It may seem like pedantry since we're human and inferring missing data is literally hard-wired, but machines can't do that. They can quite happily explode themselves if we make some assumption that ends up being wrong.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            Oh yes, 500w x 2 hrs, etc. Sorry didn’t expound further, but that’s the idea.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 months ago

            You’re still not getting it dude. Making the assumption about the duration should not happen. Making assumptions about power is how people and/or wallets get hurt by power.

            Plain and simple, a duration was not given in Srsly_Bro’s post. That’s why I asked him to “do the reasoning” as he suggested. Yet he still hasn’t. Maybe you can then. How do you get 1 hour from 24/7? I can get at least 3 other durations that make more sense than that. The blog post was talking about monthly usage, so did he mean 24/7 for a month? Nah, that doesn’t make sense because that would mean his PC pulls less than 1 W on average. He literally said 24/7, did he mean 24 hours or 7 days? 7 days still doesn’t seem right, that’d be under 3W. 24 hours kinda makes sense, that works out to about 20W. Which isn’t an unreasonable power draw for a desktop PC to average for a day given plenty of idle hours.

            You jumped on an indefensible bandwagon of confusion. It’s never too late to just say you get it and give up.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 8 months ago

        Never thought my boy @ronch would be the smartest in the room. Expectations change, Bros.

          • Waco
          • 8 months ago

          ronche made an assumption based on your incorrect usage of units. It may have been the correct one, but you still murdered the units.

          Ladders of death may be hated, but they’ll save your life if you ever touch anything electrical.

          • ronch
          • 8 months ago

          Not sure if I should take that the positive way or the negative way.

          Geddit?

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 8 months ago

            Yeah, and yet.

            [url<]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nspwh1ThSPw[/url<]

      • Waco
      • 8 months ago

      It’s hard to do math when you abuse units, bro.

        • cygnus1
        • 8 months ago

        I just can’t up vote that enough

        • Wirko
        • 8 months ago

        You can; just divide or multiply by 1000 if you don’t like the result.

      • just brew it!
      • 8 months ago

      So your PC is the only thing in your house that uses electricity? Interesting.

      And yeah, .5kwh is an absolute amount of energy (not a rate), so it is meaningless unless you also specify a duration.

      I assume you actually meant .5kW, not .5kWH.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 8 months ago

        I already said I didn’t specify the duration. For being nerds, only ronch excels at math and comprehension. I asked you dorks to figure it out. Don’t make me break it down anymore.

        Nowhere did I say it was my house. Reading is tough, bro.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 months ago

          You’re not getting it. kWh is not a rate. It is a unit of energy. Like miles is a unit of distance and gallon is a unit of volume. It is a measure of an absolute thing. There’s nothing to figure out from what you posted because what you posted does not make sense because you do not understand the unit that you used. kWh and KW are not interchangeable and have drastically different physical meaning.

          • Waco
          • 8 months ago

          Doubling down on your misunderstanding?

          That’s a bold move, Cotton. Let’s see how it plays out.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 8 months ago

            [quote<]Doubling down on your misunderstanding?[/quote<] It works on Twitter, so I guess I can understand thinking it might work here...

          • just brew it!
          • 8 months ago

          You still don’t get it. Saying “My PC runs 24/7 at around .5kwh” is like saying “my car uses about 1 gallon of gas”. “kWh” is a unit of absolute quantity like “gallon”, not a rate of consumption.

          There are three possibilities: Either A) you meant “kW” (without the “h”); or B) you forgot to specify the length of time over which .5kWh of power is consumed; or C) you’re just making sh*t up. Since you’ve stubbornly refused to clarify what you actually meant, I guess we’re going with option C.

            • Gastec
            • 7 months ago

            All of you including the Srsly_Bro are trolls.

    • anotherengineer
    • 8 months ago

    hmm strange coincidence, I just got my bill in the mail today, this billing period (29 days) 801kw.hr, so about 27.62kw.hr per day.

    Now, during Christmas with all the lights and cooking etc. bills of 1200-1400 kw.hrs for that month is not surprising.

    And bills in the spring and fall sometimes don’t even break 650kw.hrs a month.

    A decent chunk of that is probably drying laundry in the electric clothes dryer due to 2 young children.

    (hot water, range and heat is forced air natural gas & 400 miles north of Rochester NY)

    Edit – over 106kw.hrs a day?!?! I think some people confused that with per month. If you’re using that much, you better shut down your grow-op now!!

      • cygnus1
      • 8 months ago

      I did mess up my guess, but my worst month in the last year was about 90 per day, around 2700 total in June. It’s hot in Florida and AC can be expensive on top of a few servers pumping out heat too.

        • anotherengineer
        • 8 months ago

        hmmm Having just come back from Florida I would say it’s your poorly built houses, or poorly insulated would be more correct.

        Single pane glass, minimal insulation, if any. Last time I seen a single pane window was here, when I was like 7yrs old and the window was from 1960’s lol

        We can get +30C here in the summer and yes AC does use some power, and my old 2 ton with 10 SEER running a month straight (even at night) didn’t break 35kwhrs a day. Then again, triple pane windows, closed blinds on the south side and R-50 in the roof and R-40 walls help keep the cool in and the heat out.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 months ago

          Yeah, that’s not it. House is only 5 years old. It’s pretty well insulated, no single pane glass, but it is 2 story and tends to concentrate heat upstairs, especially with all the electronics up there. What is wrong though, is the AC isn’t designed well. I have a damper that’s part of the AC zoning that’s been sticking and causing the AC to run for way too long doing nothing. AC contractors are pretty terrible in the area and it’s hard to find someone that will even call back. Luckily the Exobee I put in started alerting me to the hours it was running without lowering the temp and I at least know what the problem is.

    • Pitabred
    • 8 months ago

    I voted 46-60 as the average during my highest usage month in the last year was 49kWh. But I also have a lot of brats and a 400sq ft. house. That said, I have solar panels that offset a lot of my usage, so I’ve been as low as 44kWh for the entire month last March when it was just very nice weather and still sunny.

    • oldog
    • 8 months ago

    Large “older” home in So Cal. Last years total kWh = 12,834.

    Averaging about 35 kWh/day.

    Interestingly, almost 1/2 of my energy consumption is from two summer months.

    • e1jones
    • 8 months ago

    I’ve had solar for about 6 years, with a second system added 2 years ago (now totaling 7 kW). Since adding the 2nd system, we’ve net exported slightly with 10k kWh produced per year.

    Usage runs about 26 kWh per day across the whole year, with the really hot summer days probably closer to 60 kWh per day.

    Two adults (I work from home) and 2 kids….

    • wingless
    • 8 months ago

    This time of year in Houston, I’m doing 16 to 22 per day, but the average is around 18 to 19.

    • NovusBogus
    • 8 months ago

    Based on a couple of electric bills I have lying around, it looks like my winter average is about 8 kWh per day and summer is 25-40. Two bedroom apartment with gas heating.

    • homerdog
    • 8 months ago

    6 people have AMD GPU.

    • iQuasarLV
    • 8 months ago

    I average between 35-40 KWh/day. This is a house with 2 people, one being there 24/7.

    Also in a town with 100% electrical utilities. So, stove, water heater, and furnace heating.

    • Redocbew
    • 8 months ago

    Daily average for last month was 8.57 kWh/day. The month before that was 8.69, so pretty much the same.

    That’s for a one person household with two PCs, one of which stays turned on 24/7, and the other seeing only occasional usage. There’s also a Synology NAS, two routers, an 8port switch and an SB6183 modem, but I doubt that contributes much. I would think that’s about as low as you can get without power being generated by solar or wind.

    • sleeprae
    • 8 months ago

    Averages over the last 5 years:
    May to Sep: 102kWh/day
    Oct to Apr: 69kWh/day

    I have way too much server/enterprise-grade gear and am starting to become a bit more careful. I recently bought a Brocade 8000 switch (24 port SFP+ 10gb) but decided not to keep it running as it pulls 300 watts. I am awaiting delivery of a Cisco Nexus 3064 to replace it that purportedly pulls closer to 120 watts.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      Are you running any DC apps?

    • llisandro
    • 8 months ago

    19 for a family of 3.
    Avg daily temp in summer is ~70 here, 21 daily avg in summer.

    We just got a new meter, and it shows me that we use almost double the electricity on Saturdays than a weekday. The histograms also shows me clearly when the in-laws were visiting. 🙂

    • Mr Bill
    • 8 months ago

    Wow, you have 62 panels. I have a spreadsheet I used to calculate possibly putting solar on my business. I have room for 64 panels. Around here, that would get me a design rating of about 2580 KWhr/month. That’s with 350W panels, 17.9% efficiency derating factor 0.77. This gives derated AC output of 1.34KWhr/panel or 40.3 KWhr/month per panel for a total of 2580 KWhr/month.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 8 months ago

    I have a gas furnace, which probably tilts the results severely. In the winter, the majority of my costs are gas heating. If I had a heat-pump instead, it’d be electricity in the winter.

    My monthly usage is ~250kWh in the Winter, and ~700kWh in the Summer. So that’s ~500kWh to air conditioning.

    Average across a year was ~13kWh / day.

    My house is a small Townhome btw.

    • Kretschmer
    • 8 months ago

    Tiny New York studio apartment checking in. Last month was 8.3 kWh per day. My peak usage last August was 16 kWh per day.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      On average Seattle has even smaller apartments than NYC. I read that somewhere.

        • Kretschmer
        • 8 months ago

        It’s possible, if you include the boroughs. Manhattan itself is pretty tight!

        For reference, my current apartment is about 525 sqft, and that’s the largest I’ve rented solo. I’ve been as small as 225 sqft and averaged ~350 sqft.

        • davidbowser
        • 8 months ago

        NYC is weird with apartments because they vary in price/square foot across different neighborhoods and boroughs.

        [url<]https://streeteasy.com/blog/cost-per-square-foot-nyc-manhattan-brooklyn-queens-price/[/url<]

    • Mr Bill
    • 8 months ago

    My home ranges from 1000-1200 KWhr/month during the year so, 33-40 KWhr/day. My work ranges from 2800 to 5800 KWhr/month with an annual average of 3750 KWhr/month or 125 KWhr/day. We heat with gas and cool with swamp cooler at home but heat with gas and cool with refrigeration at work.

    • jmc2
    • 8 months ago

    ——————————daily ave———————-
    Month of Jan.—————–May—————–June
    2018——17 ——————-12——————-17
    2017——16——————–17—————— 20

    • Evan
    • 8 months ago

    I messed up on my “vote” and can’t seem to fix it; I think I put in 31-45 but it’s really 46-60 for me since I messed up my first calculation. I just ran rough numbers for the past year and I use about 50 kWh per day, with much of that being to charge my car and to run some desktops that are working at Folding@Home most of the time (the desktops consume probably close to 20 kWh per day, mostly due to my old dual-socket workstation with too much RAM). I do have a central air conditioner that consumes a lot of power in summer months when it gets too hot here in San Diego, though that’s not too often. I have solar panels that averaged production just shy of 30 kWh per day in 2018, and I have a PowerWall 2 that stores some of the excess power the solar panels generate during the day for use in the evening. I’m hoping to add another couple of PowerWalls later this year to be able to be less dependent on the grid and use more of the power my solar panels generate directly, but I’m waiting for the renewed SGIP to come through for that (I did get a substantial state rebate from the first SGIP last year on the one I have). I do have an electric dryer but the water heater, stove, and oven are all gas; when those need replacing, I’ll get electric ones. Edit: My furnace is also gas-fired, though it doesn’t see a whole lot of use here. My car gets about 3.3 miles/5.3 km per kWh.

      • e1jones
      • 8 months ago

      *high-five for San Diego!*

      Fortunately the power grid here is fairly stable, but there have been a couple incidents in the last couple years where somehow the neighborhood grid gets wiped out. When it’s ~3 hours in the middle of the night, that’s not bad. When it turns into ~20 hours in the middle of summer and its 100-ish F outside? Not cool (literally). And don’t get me into the big one that wiped out Southern CA and adjoining areas for what, 3 days 5-ish years ago?

      Is your PowerWall tied to and able to run your AC? That would really be the prime driver to getting one sooner than later. Did you go thru Tesla or one of their resellers?

      Your EV doesn’t sound bad efficiency-wise. I think some of the newer ones are closer to 3.8m/kWh or so… also on the list.

        • Evan
        • 8 months ago

        I think the huge outage you’re talking about happened sometime in 2011, since it was before I moved here (effectively, January 1st of 2012). You’re right, the grid is fairly stable here, and most outages are planned ones, it seems.

        The way my circuit breakers are set up, if the grid went out and I had just the solar and PowerWall to use, I couldn’t run the air conditioner, dryer, or car charger, since they’re on the old circuit breaker panel that isn’t backed up by the PowerWall. The reason for this was that a single PowerWall 2 can only put out (or take in) 5 kW, and at maximum draw, any of those could exceed that. That’s part of the reason I want to get another two of them – if there were some serious outage, I could have everything backed up with the PowerWalls (after having them change the circuit breaker layout when the install the other two), since they could provide up to 15 kW and that would definitely be enough for any of those to operate, albeit probably not more than one or two at the same time. The other appeal would be that I would have very little grid interaction, since three PowerWall 2s would be enough to store most of the electricity my solar panels generate even on a good day, and even in a long-term outage situation I would probably be fine with just the solar and PowerWalls, not that that’s likely to happen.

        I haven’t looked at the efficiency of other brands but I know the Tesla Model 3 gets closer to 4 miles per kWh (I have an S 75D), which is a pretty good boost. I’m sure they’ll refine that further and hopefully figure out more ways of making battery packs compact and inexpensive.

    • KeillRandor
    • 8 months ago

    I have some ongoing problems with my electric atm., and my current use at the meter is about double what it should be – so it’s up to ~19kwh a day atm 🙁

    (Am waiting for an electrician form my landlord.)

    • moose17145
    • 8 months ago

    I will have to check my usage when I get home, but I can already tell you right now one of my power users is going to be the Engine Block heater on my truck which I plug in every night during winter.

    I live in Minnesota and it has been cold and my truck lives outdoors.

    That thing was worth it’s weight in gold when it got down to -35 deg F this year.

    • Misel
    • 8 months ago

    Do you all heat with electricity?

    Last year my household used about 5000kWh which is considered *a lot* in Germany.

    I’m surprised I ended up in the lowest category (5000kWh / 365 days = 13.7kWh). Did I make a mistake in my calculations?

      • wizardz
      • 8 months ago

      i do heat exclusively with electricity. I don’t think its common. Most of my friends in the neighboring provinces have an hybrid system oil/gas-electricity.
      its pretty cheap here, maxes at around 0.0912$CAD / kwh or about 0.06Euro/kWh. the first 30kWh are at 0.0591$CAD/kWh.

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 months ago

      Depends on the cost of electricity.

      Here in Canada, Manitoba and Quebec have about the lowest rates for electricity and many people use it for heat. Since it is usually -20C for 6 months of the year here with a few weeks of -30C and -40C, a typical home could use 5000kwhr a month for heating or even more.

      Most provinces natural gas is cheaper for heating. It probably saves me about $800 a month in heating cost vs using electricity. So the majority of heating in Canada is typically with natural gas.

      Edit – homes here are probably larger than typical home in Germany, and many are old and not efficient.

      • Theolendras
      • 8 months ago

      5000KWh is 2 winter months for me. Electricity is my sole household source of energy mind you. And I won’t tell where I am from but I’m not sorry :p

      • ludi
      • 8 months ago

      It varies widely, partly because the US spans a vast range of climates and utility infrastructure has been built up to match the regional needs. To get a rough idea, draw a 3×3 hatch over the US and label it Electricity or Hydrocarbon like so:

      [code<]E H H E H H E E E[/code<] Top left "E" is due to cheap electricity from the Columbia River hydro projects. All other "E" squares have temperate or warm winters and can rely sparingly on electric heat, either resistance or heat-pump type. The "H" squares have colder winters and typically rely on some combination of piped natural gas (methane) or trucked-in and locally stored LPG (liquid propane) or fuel oil. None of this is exclusive. If you live anywhere on the west coast, east coast, or within 10-15 miles of a major town or city anywhere else, odds are good you have access to piped natural gas, and most commercial buildings and some newer residential will have it even if electricity is the dominant form of heating otherwise.

    • Nictron
    • 8 months ago

    My total draw for the month of February was 744.9 kWh and got in 995.9 kWh of energy.

    I can probably expand my battery capacity but for now it is sufficient. Though I’ve considered improving storage for a while so that I can run things like AC’s in the evening on a separate shunt or timer.

    I am completely off grid.

    Highest day to date 42.3 kWh on 22 January 2019. South Africa – Southern hemisphere.

    • Voldenuit
    • 8 months ago

    Average daily usage over past 6 months: ~16.5 kWH

    Average daily usage last month (Feb): 19 kWH

    Average daily usage in Dec: 25 kWH

    It doesn’t help that my PUD is a bit inconsistent in when they read the meter, so sometimes a “monthly” bill is 40 days, or 28 days, or 30 days, and I didn’t go digging into every bill to get the actual number of days charged on every bill, but summing up every bill for the past 6 months or so should average out the errors.

    1 person household, 1 desktop and a couple laptops (rarely used), electric heating and cooking.

    • wizardz
    • 8 months ago

    you are actually missing a bracket between 75 and 90.
    i’m currently sitting at 85.9kWh daily or 32,029kWh yearly.

    I’m in southern Quebec which means i don’t have access to all the sweepstakes at TR, but i do get some of the cheapest electricity in the world. average monthly bill is ~240$CAD

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      Fixed, thank you. You can vote in the right range now. 🙂

        • wizardz
        • 8 months ago

        shoost.. i actually put mine in the 90-105 before realizing my mistake..

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 months ago

    The single number average is much like average FPS. Pretty meaningless overall other than trying to figure out what I spend in a year, I guess.

    We’re in the 28-31 kWh per day range for February/March, usually right around 29. Ameren even shows daily usage now that they’ve replaced my meter, which is neat.

    Part of that is driven by the fact that it’s been cold, and part of it is that I work from home so I have a couple of PCs and a bunch of lights on that I wouldn’t otherwise. They’re all LED bulbs and the PCs are relatively low power consumption, but it’s more than the 0 that would be the case otherwise. That’s a house with four people and a handful of pets that don’t know how to turn on the lights so I’m not sure they count.

    Also you have a gap between 75 and 90 kWh.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      [quote<]Also you have a gap between 75 and 90 kWh.[/quote<] That's it. I'm done with polls. 🙁 [i<]Edit: Also, I'm good with a daily average because I can easily multiply it by 365 for a rough annual target. It seemed like something more granular was better to inquire about, even if it will swing wildly with the seasons/other reasons.[/i<]

    • Litzner
    • 8 months ago

    27kWh as the highest month last summer with the AC running.

    37kWh as the highest month this winter with the pellet stove running, and the heat wire keeping my ice damns clear on the roof.

    15kWh as the lowest month last year, April, so little heat running, no AC yet, and excited to be able to go outside.

    Typically 2 fairly powerful and OCed PCs running in a house of 2 people.

    • Helmore
    • 8 months ago

    I use around 40 to 50 kWhs a month, but I live on my own in a relatively small studio appartment.

      • thedosbox
      • 8 months ago

      Heh, I thought I was doing well as I read the other replies. Mine ranges from 140 – 200 kWh a month. But this is in the icy depths of Canada.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 months ago

    No cheese option? For shame.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      My cheese option was “I care more about cheese than the ‘accuracy’ of this poll” – but it got cut in the name of actual accuracy.

        • Redocbew
        • 8 months ago

        A zero sum game without cheese means everybody loses.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 8 months ago

          Loses weights and loses percentage points for risk of CV diseases?

    • vcdechagn
    • 8 months ago

    Ok, I reviewed my last 24 months usage. You might need some broader categories. 15 kwh is about 1.50 a month electric bill. I know of NO ONE who gets that low without Solar or Wind.

    I’d say multiply everything by a factor of 10..so your top category is more than 1000 kwh.

    Peak: 2579 kwh (Aug 2017, I live in the midwest)
    Low: 1197 (March 2017)

    I have a family of 10, 9 of which are device savvy. We have the following computer inventory:

    Pizza Box (1U) Server (ESX)
    12TB NAS
    Windows Server
    9 Laptops (2 for me, one for everyone else over the age of 4)
    Assorted iPads, phones, etc

    My electric company frequently (at least 4x a year) sends me letters about how much more efficient my neighbors are than I am 🙂

    I am a consultant who works from home 95% of the time and my children are home educated so we are home 16-20 hours a day most days….

    I can’t really imagine a scenario where a typical family uses more power. My electric bill averages 206 per month.

    Edited to change the server type (from blade to 1u pizza box)

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      Yeah, the poll was supposed to be about DAILY usage. I, uh, may have had a massive “typo.” Not sure what happened.

      [i<]Edit: BTW, thank you for your detailed response.[/i<]

        • vcdechagn
        • 8 months ago

        Oops…that puts me at the average of about 70 a day (my average consumption is probably 2000). I’ll answer the poll correctly 🙂

      • davidbowser
      • 8 months ago

      You and I are in similar situations: 8 people in my house, it is very old (250-300 years old and thus nearly impossible to heat/cool), relatively large, and very tech enabled. Home office with servers and NAS in the basement rack and everyone in the house has at least 1 laptop/chromebook and there are a few shared desktops.

      I also fall into the +70kWh over the last 12 months.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 8 months ago

      I forgot my math so my answer is worthless. Rip shaq.

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