Bargain basement: a Ryzen 7 2700 for $230 and a ton of cheap system components

Greetings, my good gerbils. My quest for weight loss has been going well—184 lbs and dropping (at 5' 11" with wide shoulders). I've never been really fat, but over time I built up a little belly and love handles that are quite unpleasant. Although I've been hitting the gym mostly for maintenance for a while, I decided to kick things up a notch and step up my running game and improve my diet. A lot of people will tell you that the battle for weight loss and/or body-building is won in the kitchen, and unfortunately they're absolutely correct. Now take a look at the PC hardware deals we collected for you while I go munch on some chicken.

  • We're pretty happy that the price of pretty much every type of component is on a downward trend. System memory is a prime example of that. Both the Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro and the G.Skill Trident Z RGB are memory kits with 16 GB of capacity spread across a couple of sticks clocked at 3000 MT/s. Whatever style and brand you choose, you get speedy RAM and Technicolor lighting. The Corsair kit is going for $109.99 at Newegg. Not surprisingly, the G.Skill set is priced at exactly the same $109.99.

  • Who doesn't love a mouse with a handy shape and that requires no wires? The Corsair Dark Core RGB says hello. This rodent can be used both with a wire attached or in glorious 2.4 GHz wireless mode. It has a 16,000 DPI optical sensor, a total of seven programmable buttons including a sniper button, and interchangeable side grips. Did we mention the multi-zone fancy lighting? Darn right. Get it from Newegg for just $49.99 with cart code EMCTWUV42. Good wireless mice tend to go for twice that, folks.

  • Fast and cheap solid-state drives? Right this way, sir. The Intel 660p 512 GB NVMe SSD is an affordable-but-speedy affair, capable of pushing 1500 MB/s on sequential reads and 1000 MB/s when writing. As befitting an NVMe drive, it can do 90 K IOPS when reading and 220 K IOPS when writing. This bit bucket can be yours from Newegg for a silly low $62.99 with cart code EMCTWUV24.

  • Need to power up a high-end rig? The Corsair RM850x is one of the finest power supplies you can get your hands on. It's modular, 80 Plus Gold certified, has semi-passive cooling, and comes with enough cables for just about any system. Corsair also offers a ten-year warranty on it. I'm running the 750 W version on my own box, and I reckon this is about as perfect as a PSU gets. Grab the RM850x from Newegg for $109.99 with cart code EMCTWUV35, and use the included mail-in rebate to get another $20 back.

  • The final bit of kit today will be right at home in your living room, or perhaps as a part of your PC setup: the Pioneer VSX-933 7.2 receiver. It can push 80 W per channel, uses a 32-bit DAC, and has support for pretty much every alphabet-soup audio and video format of the current age including HDR10, BT.2020, DTS:X and Dolby Atmos. Around the back, you'll find six HDMI inputs as well as Wi-Fi antennas and an Ethernet port. You can add this beast to your setup for just $259.99 at Newegg.

That's all for today, folks! There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: Not only do we have a partnership with Newegg and Amazon, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at Das Keyboard's shop.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 8 months ago

    It’s crazy how a 4C/4T i5 costed $230 or so before Ryzen came out and 8C/16T was only for RKOI brats. Ryzen really shook things up and Intel doesn’t like it one bit. (Get it?)

    BTW do Ryzen’s power-saving mechanisms (SenseMI, CnQ, etc.) still work if you overclock? I seem to have read somewhere that they are disabled when you OC.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 8 months ago

      That’s why you should buy the X model and let it use Precision Boost 2 to overclock itself automatically.

        • ronch
        • 8 months ago

        Yeah. I’ve always thought there’s a big asterisk when overclocking Ryzen. But didn’t previous Intel and AMD chips still throttle down when overclocked?

          • synthtel2
          • 8 months ago

          P-state overclocks are a thing with Zen, they were apparently just not very well supported by motherboards early on.

            • enixenigma
            • 8 months ago

            Yeah, it’s possible, though not very intuitive, to do P-state OCs on Ryzen CPUs. I have my 1700x OCed to 3.9 GHz on all cores while still having all of the power saving features enabled. It was a b!+@# to figure out on my Gigabyte MB (arbitrary placement in a menu far removed from the rest of the OC options and hash values FTW), but I eventually got it.

            EDIT: I do agree with JAE that it probably isn’t worth the effort to manually OC Zen+ (and presumably Zen 2, but we’ll see). Precision Boost 2 is likely going to give you 95%+ of what you would achieve manually without the headache.

            • qmacpoint
            • 8 months ago

            ditto!

          • MOSFET
          • 8 months ago

          [i<]edit: Ryzen overclocking is now all fine...just tested[/i<] Your FX-8350 will still throttle down if all you do is turn up the multiplier. Maybe other situations too, but that's all I ever did. Cool N Quiet should be enabled, I think. Tell ya what - i'll go check on Ryzen right now. Asus ROG strix X370-F. Ryzen 5 1600. RyzenMaster software - allows overclocking with proper idling. Asus UEFI 4406 - allows overclocking with proper idling. I simply typed in a multiplier of 38.50 (this has changed in two years) BTW I just got 3850 MHz all cores both via UEFI and via software. As far as I tried in this half hour experiment. Ran POVRAY and Cinebench R20 fine. Some of the initial Ryzen idling problems were likely not due to the CPU or the BIOS/UEFI, but due to the AMD-specific Windows power plan that shipped with chipset drivers. Jeff Kampman was the first to point out (to me anyway) that when X470 arrived, that power plan was no longer recommended, and my Ryzen idling problems went away the minute I removed it and went back to Windows Balanced.

          • K-L-Waster
          • 8 months ago

          IIRC, in Jeff’s review of RyZen+ he found that letting the X model manage clockspeed through XFR produced pretty close to the same clocks he was able to achieve by manually overclocking it.

          So unless the tinkering itself is your thang, you’re likely better off to just get an X model and a beefy cooler and spend your time using your computer instead of tweaking your OC settings.

            • ronch
            • 8 months ago

            This is pretty much why I’d steer clear of non-X models. Buy once with no regrets later.

      • MOSFET
      • 8 months ago

      Yes they still work. See lengthy post below(err, above). I just tested it since you asked.

        • ronch
        • 8 months ago

        Thanks!!

    • MJZ82
    • 8 months ago

    For the G.Skill RipJaws, the Newegg page doesn’t specify whether it is 2x8GB or 4x4GB. However, it does have separate listings that specify, for example, a 2X8GB kit for about $10 more, so that seems to suggest this is a 4X4GB kit.

      • albundy
      • 8 months ago

      nope. i think its 1×16 stick of 16GB based on the the manufacturers product page. nonetheless, its terrible for b350/x370 boards since this specific one is hynix based. i’d go with another brand that is better supported. there are too many bad reviews of people not achieving the speed listed on the packaging, which doesnt surprise me. I’ve been tweaking my 2×8 version with no luck for months, trying at every bios release.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 8 months ago

      The Ripjaws V that Morphine linked is indeed a 1x 16 GiB kit. Buy two of them. 😉

    • Takeshi7
    • 8 months ago

    That Ryzen 2700 deal is already gone. Newegg is showing $249.99 🙁

      • ronch
      • 8 months ago

      At least it’s just $20 not saved.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 months ago

    That Pioneer is tempting, but when I replace my home theater receiver, it’ll be a a Denon model with [url=https://denon-uk.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/6720/~/auto-low-latency-mode<]low-latency audio support[/url<]. The AVR-X2500H is pretty sexy, and word in retro gaming circles is that it can appropriately detect and upscale 240p YPbPr signals with low lag. That could replace both my receiver and my OSSC.

      • morphine
      • 8 months ago

      Honest question, what’s that about low-latency audio in a receiver? What for / why, more specifically?

        • DancinJack
        • 8 months ago

        [quote=”Denon”<]Displays using ALLM should reduce this processing (motion compensation, etc.) to minimize delays before presenting the information, making the gaming experience feel more responsive. Compatible Denon AVRs disable the following functions as same as Game mode in the conventional video mode setting when the ALLM mode is enable at HDMI input signal to achieve a lower latency: Picture Adjust i/p-Scaler Audio Delay (Auto Lip Sync) ALLM can also solve some video conferencing (Skype, etc.) issues, such as lip-sync.[/quote<]

          • morphine
          • 8 months ago

          Thanks!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        ALLM is part of the HDMI 2.1 spec: [url<]https://www.hdmi.org/manufacturer/hdmi_2_1/index.aspx[/url<] For me it's a deal because my receiver seems to get behind processing DTS 5.1 and Dolby Digital+ 5.1 streams from my PS4 Pro. I can't hardly watch Netflix while bitstreaming is enabled because lips are ahead of the audio. It's like watching Godzilla all the time. It's less noticeable while gaming, but it's still there when, for example, you fire a gun in an FPS. Recoil starts before you hear it. You can "fix" it on the receiver by delaying video by 50ms. That's fine for watching videos, but it's not find for playing games. It MIGHT just be that my Sony STR-DH550 is slow, but supporting ALLM should ensure that it doesn't happen any more.

          • morphine
          • 8 months ago

          Thanks for the info, learn something new every day.

      • jihadjoe
      • 8 months ago

      I don’t think it’s specifically low latency audio, but rather an autoconfig to automatically go into low latency mode (which is more intended for video).

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        My problems are related to low-latency modes, though, because I’m using ARC on my receiver for audio and the TV’s display is in game mode. If I turn game mode off (an experiment I tried today) it seems to have fixed the sync issues, so the receiver needs to drop latency to keep game mode in sync.

        Maybe it’s just an issue with my receiver/TV combo, or the receiver itself, but either way it’s something I feel pretty good about the chances of a receiver upgrade fixing.

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