All the Nvidia GTX 1660 graphics cards

Expectedly, hot on the heels of the release of the Nvidia GTX 1660 Ti comes the 1660. Just like its ever-so-slightly bigger brother, the 1660 is based on the Turing architecture, uses the TU116 GPU, and lacks RT and Tensor cores. Because it’s missing those cores, the 1660 wears the “GTX” hat instead of “RTX,” even though it’s based on Turing.

It’s unsurprising that the 1660 is quite similar to the 1660 Ti, although there are differences large and small. The 1660 has a cut-down number of CUDA cores, from 1536 to 1408, but it has slightly higher clocks–1530 MHz compared to 1500 MHz base, and 1785 MHz to 1770 MHz boost. They have the same 192-bit memory interface width, but the 1660 Ti boasts 288 GBps bandwidth to the 1660’s 192 GBps. The I/O is the same, and the laundry list of features is otherwise the same.

The biggest difference is that Nvidia slapped GDDR5 memory on the 1660 instead of the newer GDDR6 that the 1660 Ti enjoys. That, and the price; Nvidia is happily pointing out that the GTX 1660 brings Turing to the low, low price point of $219, down from the 1660 Ti’s $279 base price.

The GTX 1660 is iterative, a way for Nvidia to roll more cards out to the world at more price points. Below are all the 1660 cards we know of at the moment from Nvidia’s AIB partners.

If instead you’re hunting for the 1660 Ti, those are all gathered here.

Asus

As with the GTX 1660 Ti launch, Asus has four cards ready for the GTX 1660. What’s a little different is that the four of them hit different spots in the brand stack. Two are TUF cards, and two bear the “Phoenix” moniker.

The two TUF cards, one with an “OC” suffix, are both dual-fan designs. The fans have dual ball bearings and boast dustproof IP5X ratings. The cards have a metal backplate, too. The other two cards, the Phoenix GTX 1660 and GTX 1660 OC, have the same fans, but just one apiece, and they’re commensurately smaller to fit into compact builds. All four cards have the DVI-D, HDMI 2.0b, and DisplayPort 1.4 I/O.

Colorful

A long card with a long name, the Colorful iGame GeForce GTX 1660 Ultra 6G is the company’s lone entrant in the 1660 sweepstakes. Parked at the base price of $219, the card has three fans and appears to have the standard spate of three ports: the DVI-D, HDMI 2.0b, and DisplayPort 1.4.

EVGA

EVGA put out a trio of 1660 cards with its usual brand names attached: the 1660 XC Black, XC, and XC Ultra, providing symmetry with its three 1660 Ti models. They differ in base clock speed, primarily. The Ultra XC version takes up two slots whereas the others occupy 2.75 owing to the size of their respective heatsinks. The XC Black and XC cards are compact and have one fan, whereas the XC Ultra is a longer card with two.

It looks like the external bits are identical to their corresponding 1660 Ti siblings; EVGA seems to have simply added “& GTX 1660” to the product pages.

The 1660 XC Black is not yet available, but the XC model is “marked down” from $229.99 to $219.99 with a MIR. The XC Ultra card is listed there for $249.99, but it drops to $229.99 after a discount and a MIR.

Gainward

Gainward isn’t exactly a big name in the AIB world, but the company does have three GTX 1660 cards on offer, the Pegasus, Pegasus OC, and Ghost OC. The two OC models have a boost clock of 1830 MHz, while the Pegasus is at 1785 MHz, wth 130 W and 120 W TGPs to match. Both Pegasus cards are two-slot, single-fan cards meant for compact systems; the Ghost OC has two fans. The prices weren’t listed.

Galax

When the GTX 1660 Ti cards debuted, Galax was late to the party. This time around, there’s a pile of 1660 cards. The standard 1660 model has a long black shroud with a “Vapor Chamber heatsink” and blower at the end. It has a 1785 MHz clock and a different set of connectors–three DisplayPort 1.4 and one HDMI 2.0b.

The rest of the group all have two fans apiece and feature Galax’s one-click overclocking feature, hence the names. The EX and White EX models have 90-mm fans with three heat pipes underneath and a backplate keeping things sturdy. They also have RGB lighting, because of course they do, along with the standard DisplayPort, HDMI, and DVI-D ports. The difference between the two is that one is white. Their clocks are higher than the base model, at 1830 MHz.

The 1660 (1-Click OC) also has two 90-mm fans and a backplate, but the heat pipe configuration is different, and it lacks RGG lighting. Although the White Mini card also has two fans, they’re just 80-mm to account for its cut-down size that’s designed for ITX builds. It has a backplate as well as three heat pipes like its bigger brothers, albeit not in the same layout. These two cards are clocked at 1800 MHz. At this time, none are listed in Galax’s webstore. It’s not clear how much they cost.

Gigabyte

Two of Gigabyte’s GTX 1660 cards have three fans, and one has two fans. The 1660 Gaming and Gaming OC cards use the company’s triple Windforce fans, three copper heat pipes, and 3D active fan technology. Both are dotted with RGB Fusion 2.0 lighting and sport metal backplates, and both offer one HDMI and three DisplayPort 1.4 outs. The main difference between the two is that the Gaming OC model has a boost clock of 1860 MHz, while the Gaming card’s is 1785 MHz.

The 1660 OC has a relatively high 1830 MHz clock, but it’s cut down in size with a dual-fan Windforce cooling system. It has the same four-port I/O as the other two Gigabyte 1660 cards.

The Gaming card isn’t yet listed on Newegg, but the Gaming OC will run you $239.99, and the smaller 1660 OC is simply listed as “out of stock” with no price tag.

Inno3D

It appears that Inno3D has but one GTX 1660, the Twin X2. The two-slot card has a metal backplate, two fans, and a 1785 MHz clock. Inno3D opted for the four-port I/O configuration that consists of three DisplayPort and one HDMI. It’s not available in the U.S. at this time.

MSI

MSI’s GTX 1660 lineup has three members–the Gaming X, Armor OC, and Ventus X OC. The Gaming X has two Torx 3.0 fans and Zero Frozr technology for 0 dB levels at low loads as well as Mystic Light RGB. The other two cards have Torx 2.0, with the Armor OC version embracing the Twin Frozr technology, too. All three cards have three DisplayPorts and one HDMI.

Otherwise, they differ from one another in clock speed: The Gaming X is 1860 MHz, the Armor OC is 1845 MHz, and the Ventux X OC is 1830 MHz. On Amazon, they cost $249.99, $239.99, and $229.99, respectively.

Palit

Palit brought four GTX 1660 cards to the party. The StormX and StormX OC cards have one fan. The former is clocked at 1785 MHz, and the latter 1830 MHz. Per the name, the Dual and Dual OC models have two fans each and follow their siblings’ boost clock scheme. All four cards use the DVI-D, DisplayPort, and HDMI port array. None appear to have price listings online yet.

PNY

Like its 1660 Ti launch, PNY has just the one 1660 card, the single-fan XLR8 Gaming Overlocked Edition. Price at $229.99, the little guy has a boost of 1830 MHz and the three-port option. (DVI-D, DisplayPort, and HDMI). And that’s about all there is to say about that.

Zotac

Last but not least in the vendor list is Zotac, with two. The Gaming GeForce GTX 1660 AMP and Gaming GeForce GTX 1660 each have two fans, but as you might guess, the AMP version has the higher clock–1830 MHz to 1785 MHz. It also sports Zotac’s IceStorm 2.0 cooling, with three copper heatpipes, big heatsink, 90-mm fans, and metal backplate. The non-AMP version alacks backplate. Both make use of one HDMI and three DisplayPort I/O options.

You can find the AMP version on Amazon for $239.99; the non-AMP version comes in at the relatively low low price of $219.99.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 7 months ago

    Cheesiest name : Colorful (LoL)

    Surprising appearance : Gainward

    Scoffing at : Colorful (again)

    Hmm : Galax???

      • Redocbew
      • 7 months ago

      Galax is well known among overclockers, aren’t they? I seem to remember them making a few cards with VRMs so obviously beyond anything you’d need for everyday usage it was almost kind of ridiculous.

    • ronch
    • 7 months ago

    Are these chips like the 386SX or 486SX?

      • K-L-Waster
      • 7 months ago

      What, you mean their math co-processor is physically disabled and they have half the bus width?

    • Fonbu
    • 7 months ago

    Notice the disappearance of DVI-D off of most of these mainstream cards? I see that as progress. Adapters, such as HDMI to DVI-D, are readily available from the stores that sell these anyway.

    With some of the other news of AMD vega 56 cards doing raytracing in the new Cryengine. I wonder if these 1660 could still potentially do this feature? Just not the Nvidia proprietary Raytracing tech, since they lack the cores for that. They could use the DX12 raytrace tech I bet!

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 months ago

      I would certainly choose a card with DVI over a card that lacked it; if I could add a 4th port of my choosing, it would start with VGA and continue right through the ages with DVI, DP and HDMI.

      (This is because I am not interested in attaching multiple monitors of the same vintage, as I do not buy multiple monitors of the save vintage. I am more interested in maintaining the option to use all hardware until the point that I get tired of using it.)

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 months ago

    I just see the 1600-series as a demonstration of how little mainstream performance/$ has changed between Pascal and Turing.

    It’s just 20% faster than a 2.5-year-old GTX 1060 and since you can pick those up from $200, the 1660 falls in line on the price/performance chart exactly where the 2.5-year-old Pascal card does.

    In terms of new features? Nope! Those are RTX-exclusives.
    What about power effeciency? Nope! Matches a 1060 almost to the Watt.

    Thanks Ngreedia for an amazing jump in progress since 2016!

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      Actually, Turing is considerably faster at DX12-level features due to architectural changes (RTX mode is just a way of using Tensor cores for graphical workloads). It is Nvidia’s first real DX12-era design. Fermi-Pascal are really just DX11-era designs with DX12 support bolted on via software.

      I suspect Nvidia will use its clout to make DX12 support more ubiquitous as a means of planned obsolescence for older chips.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 7 months ago

    You folks planning a 1660 and 1660 Ti review?

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      Here comes the naysayers who say “TR is too slow and too late to the party!”

        • euricog
        • 7 months ago

        I for one value a lot TR’s reviews regardless of how late they may arrive. Straight to the point, they benchmark what really matters (smoothness) and that beautiful value scatter plot at the end, which for me is the most useful thing any hardware review could have!

          • Ninjitsu
          • 7 months ago

          Same, just curious if they actually plan to do one on these. For the first time in years I’m considering picking up a new GPU (the 1660 Ti), but waiting for the prices to settle a bit (not in the US) and for a TR review.

        • cygnus1
        • 7 months ago

        Meh, I’m of the age where I don’t buy hardware so close to release that TR’s review schedule ever excludes their input from that decision.

        • DancinJack
        • 7 months ago

        I don’t think it’s an unreasonable question to ask if TR is going to review a new graphics card?

        TR has been especially slow during the transition and I suspect there are quite a few people chomping at the bit for some more content. I’m sure they know that, and hopefully there is stuff in the pipeline. Honestly, I don’t think I have come to the site the past few weeks for articles (or the anticipation of such), but rather for the forums. That’s just how it is right now.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 7 months ago

          It is too unreasonable to ask. The TR snowball squad compiled from many flakes will show you their outrage with minus ones and posts telling you not to criticize anything. It’s common here, bro.

        • Ninjitsu
        • 7 months ago

        Naysayers? What? It was a question jeez

          • Krogoth
          • 7 months ago

          Not directly at you, but more at the incoming influx of naysays who harp on “TR is slowpoke” because tech vbloggers already did reviews on launch day.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 months ago

            please show me a single comment that you’re describing on this topic 🙂

            • Ninjitsu
            • 7 months ago

            To be fair to him i do remember those posts on articles about past launches.

            • DancinJack
            • 7 months ago

            I still don’t really think that criticism is unfair, honestly.

            • Mr Bill
            • 7 months ago

            TR should do an April fools style vblogger review on release day. We could have a competition for crazy praiseworthy descriptive phrases to include in the vblogger “review”.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 7 months ago

        Already been here, bro. You know me. I’ve just accepted I have to wait 3-4 weeks post launch for a review on one resolution.

        • torquer
        • 7 months ago

        Unfortunately slow or non existent reviews result in lower traffic. While many of the TR faithful will come back and read the reviews later due to their inherent quality (myself included), that does not a good business model make.

        Many of us have registered concerns about TR’s future, and the recent changes coupled with what appears to be a notable slowing in content even compared to the norm makes me wonder if TR will remain independent throughout 2019 and beyond.

        Its a difficult and often dying business, these “print” review sites 🙁

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 months ago

      It depends if TR have been sent any review samples, and based on a number of tech sites these days, Nvidia is cherry-picking which sites to send review samples based on how foaming-at-the-mouth, ecstatic-with-praise they were about the RTX launch.

      A lot of sites that called out RTX for what it is (overpriced solution to a problem that doesn’t exist) have been posting articles about how they’ve been cut off by Nvidia.

      I really hope Intel doesn’t suck at Integrated graphics. We need competition in the GPU space more than ever before.

      • drwho
      • 7 months ago

      surely all thse cards will perform within whiskers of each other? buy the cheapest or one with a good feature eg zero fan noise on idle, or small enough to fit itx . the rest is just windows-dressing for added cash, more heatpipes, more RGB, more overclockable ….

    • DPete27
    • 7 months ago

    Is it just me, or do we seem to be in a regression of cooler quality ever since the crypto craze.

    • barich
    • 7 months ago

    Gainward, wow, had no idea they were still around. They were a big name back when I had one of their GeForce4 Ti4200s.

      • jihadjoe
      • 7 months ago

      Golden Sample!

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      Gainward has been kicking around mostly in the EU market. They just recently came back to NA market after a long hiatus.

      • meerkt
      • 7 months ago

      Though the brand ownership changed since the GF4 days.

    • psuedonymous
    • 7 months ago

    Power is low enough for a HHHL card, though it would be tricky to fit on all the GDDR.

    • NTMBK
    • 7 months ago

    Some of those coolers are just hilariously over-specced for such a power-sipping GPU. 3 slots for a 120W card, EVGA, what are you doing?!

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      Reusing PCB and HSF from beefer SKUs (RTX 2060/2070) to cut down on bottom line costs.

        • NTMBK
        • 7 months ago

        It’s a different GPU from the 2060, meaning it will have a different pinout- they can’t just reuse the same PCB design.

          • Krogoth
          • 7 months ago

          Not necessarily. Just because the logic in the GPU is different doesn’t mean the packaging is completely different (See LGA2066 family: Kaby Lake-X, Skylake-X LCC and Skylake-X HCC)

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 7 months ago

      They are providing exactly what people will spend money on, of course. 😉

    • XTF
    • 7 months ago

    Does TR plan to review those?

    • albundy
    • 7 months ago

    so how does this compare to the msi vega 56 that was selling for $260 at newegg this week? hah, i kid. i already know the answer. i just wanted to throw it in ngreedia’s smug face.

      • chuckula
      • 7 months ago

      So AMD wants to not sell the RX 590?

      OK.

      • torquer
      • 7 months ago

      lol. there isn’t an AMD card worth buying over $200 at this point but nice try

      • jihadjoe
      • 7 months ago

      Great price for sure, but these short-term sales are sort of a game the manufacturers play with each other when the competition is launching a new card. Most of those Vega 56 sales are ending today, so it’s a good time to grab one while it’s cheap.

      [url<]https://www.extremetech.com/gaming/286160-amd-briefly-slashes-vega-56-prices-ahead-of-expected-1660-ti-launch[/url<] The RTX2080 was also briefly on sale during Radeon VII launch: [url<]https://www.pcgamer.com/gigabytes-rtx-2080-graphics-card-is-on-sale-for-dollar639-right-now/[/url<] tl;dr: It's usually a good time to buy an existing AMD/NVIDIA card when NVIDIA/AMD is launching something new.

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 months ago

      In Canada the 1660 has been going for $300 cnd, and the rx590 about $370 ish.

      [url<]https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814932138&Description=gtx1660&cm_re=gtx1660-_-14-932-138-_-Product[/url<] [url<]https://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814932141&Description=rx%20590&cm_re=rx_590-_-14-932-141-_-Product[/url<] I know which one I would buy. [url<]https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/MSI/GeForce_GTX_1660_Gaming_X/26.html[/url<]

    • Krogoth
    • 7 months ago

    Polaris RIP and Navi already has an uphill battle.

    • Waco
    • 7 months ago

    One of these is definitely my brother’s next video card.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 7 months ago

      Some would say you’re my bro, and that also makes me your bro. Make it EVGA. Thanks, bro.

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