National French Bread Day Shortbread

Dat crust.

In somber news for the written PC journalist world, Kyle Bennett of cold HardOCP fame announced that he's "mothballing" his site and taking up a position as "Director of Enthusiast Engagement" at Intel. We wish Kyle all the best in his new position and, you know, if he and Intel want to engage enthusiasts at the TR BBQ this year, that's just fine with me.

The announcement sparked a thread in the forums, and the importance of supporting independent review sites like TR quickly surfaced. I was able to offer a look behind the curtain at how things are going for TR in that thread and I encourage you to bring yourself up to speed by joining the discussion.

PC hardware and computing

  1. Asus GeForce RTX 2080 ROG Strix OC review @ bit-tech
  2. Palit GeForce GTX 1660 StormX OC review @ Hexus
  3. Razer Nari Ultimate THX wireless Chroma headset review @ KitGuru
  4. Samsung 512 GB EVO Plus MicroSD card with adapter review @ Legit Reviews
  5. Cooler Master Masterbox NR600 review @ TechPowerUp
  6. Cooler Master Masterbox NR400 review @ TechPowerUp
  7. GeForce GTX 1660 tested: 33 game benchmark feat. The Division 2 @ TechSpot

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Using Google to find Carmen Sandiego seems like cheating @ Quarter To Three (Rockapella!)
  2. Oculus Rift S isn't the Rift 2, but no external sensors is a big thumbs up @ Rock Paper Shotgun
  3. Halo: Master Chief Collection to support Windows 7 and possibly mods on PC @ Rock Paper Shotgun

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. "Severe" ransomware attack cripples big aluminum producer @ Ars Technica
  2. Maritime analog computer from 1503 is the oldest remaining @ HackADay
  3. Cable lobby seeks better reputation by dropping "cable" from its name @ Ars Technica

Science, technology, and space news

  1. As costs skyrocket, more US cities stop recycling @ Slashdot
  2. Nvidia's latest AI software turns rough doodles into realistic landscapes @ Slashdot
  3. Bill Gates talked with Google employees about using AI to analyze ultrasound images of unborn children @ Slashdot

Cheese, memes, and shiny things

  1. This keto cheese ball is loaded with all your fave potato fixings @ brit.co (I had to settle for a recipe, slow cheese news this week)
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • leor
    • 9 months ago

    I’m #1 [url<]https://techreport.com/subscriptions.x[/url<]

      • leor
      • 9 months ago

      Who’s gonna beat me?

        • leor
        • 9 months ago

        Come on, ya pansies! @drfish- I brought it back!

          • drfish
          • 9 months ago

          You are, as ever, my hero. 🙂

          Tell ya what, I’ll pick up the tab for the TR BBQ this year.

          Seriously though, thank you to everyone that has pitched in the last couple days, it’s generous and humbling.

            • leor
            • 9 months ago

            161 kicks chuck out of the top 10…

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 9 months ago

    Having a vendor neutral and unbiased review site is very important to many, but less so by the those who left their sites for big corporate money.

    #thanksMrWasson

    Don’t only pick on Kyle when TR has its own home-grown defector who to his own benefit and substantial loss to TR, left an independent tech site for personal gain.

    I think Cyril left for other reasons, so I’m good with that. I like Cyril.

    Independent review sites don’t pay as well as being a shill for a corporation. I’m not hating; I’d do the same.

    Jeff is even walking away from the site. The mission of impartiality is non-sustainable. TR will be bought out or drift away as everyone is leaving for their own reasons.

    Greed conqueres all, nerds. Independent sites are failing and this is why.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      Sorry kid, the real reason is because PC enthusiasts are frankly a dying breed. The barriers to entry are lower than ever before and you don’t even need high-end hardware to handle non-professional workloads. Interest among the old guard is just waning away as well as ad revenue/viewership.

      We are also hitting the physical and economical limits of digital computing. The days of seemingly endless exponential growth is long over. It is kinda hard to get excited when the newest platforms are barely faster than the previous few generations in majority of workloads/scenarios.

      So-called “high-end gaming builds” are really near-professional-tier hardware guise as status symbols (RGB, windowed chassis loaded with stickers). It is not too dissimilar to ricing/blinging up run-of-the-mill cars. Kiddie gamers are chasing whatever eCelebrity progamer x is using for their stream sessions. The evolution of reviews has shifting towards video format instead of websites loaded with graphs and raw data charts.

      Conflicts of interest and corporate marketing influences have been around since the beginning. Shilling for computing brands is very, very old. It used to be on printed media and USENET/BBS.

      It is no shock that old familiar reviewers have been moving onto greener pastures.

        • atari030
        • 9 months ago

        You speak the sad, sobering truth of it.

        • blastdoor
        • 9 months ago

        Yup.

        Also, the word “written” is key in this line:

        “In somber news for the written PC journalist world”

        the kids don’t like to read.

          • shaq_mobile
          • 9 months ago

          Gamers Nexus (I think that’s the name of it? The one with the guy with the luscious hair) seems to be doing well as a YouTube channel. Then again, with the recent shift in how political all online platforms are getting, I guess I understand not wanting to trust your income with a company that is willing to demonitize on a whim. One would think politics would be a non issue for a tech site, but even TR has had to take a strict stance on rnp.

          I guess we are seeing this shift in medium already. MSM and even just regular cable channels appear to be struggling. News websites are cutting staff. This sounds like a bigger problem than tech review sites.

        • chuckula
        • 9 months ago

        Once again proving Krogoth’s theory that GPUs are dying.
        (and that Germans love David Hasselhoff).

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          But are you a true survivor?

        • Mr Bill
        • 9 months ago

        The other horn of that argument is that games have not significantly increased in complexity (requiring better I/O and more CPU threads). Most of the development has gone into higher resolution graphics. Game simulation inteligence has hit a plateau. For example, first person shooters should not be able to hit somebody 1000 yards away simply by popping up a scope while on the run.

          • Redocbew
          • 9 months ago

          The Division 2 has pretty good AI, but yeah in general there hasn’t been a lot of movement there.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 9 months ago

        You basically confirmed anything I said. The reviewers themselves don’t even care about maintaining an unbiased review site. There is are several reasons including personal gain over the mission of producing unbiased reviews.

        Scott and Kyle, like most people would, chose the money path. Not sure why you replied to me if you agree with everything I said.

        C’mom bro…

          • Redocbew
          • 9 months ago

          You are getting tiresome bro, seriously.

          • K-L-Waster
          • 9 months ago

          Yes, because if a reviewer isn’t willing to destitute himself in the name of hardware reviews he just don’t care enough.

            • DavidC1
            • 9 months ago

            There seems to be an inverse connection between the effort the worker puts in versus and the quality of a product.

            I found it very interesting when reading about CD Projekt Red. Their games have glowing reviews but their treatment of employees are absolutely garbage. So if you push your employees to the point that its chaos and extract every ounce of them, you have a good chance of getting a stellar product.

            The ever increasing complexity and required precision of technology seems to have a human cost.

            Is it worth it? I don’t think so. Because it becomes tail wagging the dog.

        • CScottG
        • 9 months ago

        “The evolution of reviews has shifting towards video format instead of websites loaded with graphs and raw data charts. ”

        -this.

        PC enthusiasts aren’t a *dying breed though, they are just currently in a hardware “stall”. They were before Pascal and Skylake as well. (..and numerous cycles before then.)

        *after all, those video format sources aren’t getting *all* their viewers from the console-crowd.

        • Arbiter Odie
        • 9 months ago

        Wrong. The reason is because publishing reviews and trying to stay solvent is a two-pronged business: You must produce good content for readers and make money.

        Making money is the less fun of the two. It’s also pretty hard.

        Advertisement aggregators? They were destroyed by their lack of security sandboxing (and thus, the rise of adblockers)—and then what little money remaining in that market was swallowed up by Google.

        Direct partnerships or sponsorships? The reader base is procurement managers and gamers. These are people who don’t buy things based off brief impressions.

        Paywall? Requires too much trust. Nobody is going to throw large chunks of money at one of the (seemingly) dime a dozen tech review websites. The reader has no way to know if their reviews are enough of an upgrade to be worth their hard-earned dollars.

        That was all very negative, is there a successful example of the reader/advertiser business model? Yes: Radio.

        How does radio do it?

        They:
        1. Have local service advertisements (restaurants, laser-tag facilities, driveway re-paving etc.)
        2. Do pledge drives/community fund raiser events.
        and
        3. Sometimes get checks from philanthropic donators.

        Hard goods advertising is the wrong revenue source for this readership mixture. It’s time to implement the last two options on the “successful” list, and Techreport is the best website in this business. They can do it.

        And then later they should look at ip localized services advertising.

        (Edits for errors and clarity)

        • NovusBogus
        • 9 months ago

        Dude has a point. There was a time when enthusiast grade hardware (and sites like TR that catered to it) equated to meaningful performance improvements, but times have changed. Go down the list, see for yourself…

        CPU: Irrelevant since 2012. Anything Sandy/Ivy or later can still do just about anything, and once AMD stopped sucking a couple of years ago their products have been roughly in line with Intel. Pay X dollars, get X performance, it’s just a question of how many cores you want to have.

        Motherboard: The group of people who fuss over motherboard features has always been vanishingly small, especially since the important stuff got migrated to the CPU. Most will just pick a chipset and their favorite brand, and try to avoid anything with lots of user reviews complaining about reliability.

        RAM: Nobody cares. Get 16 or 32 gigabytes that has decent timings and/or looks cool, end of story. Even DDR3 vs. DDR4 is a snooze fest.

        GPU: Probably the last area where performance still matters, but starting to stagnate and generally gated by AAA publishers’ tendency to standardize requirements for a given generation of game consoles.

        Storage: TR’s SSD endurance test won me over as a regular reader and subscriber, but this space has been stagnant for years. The fact that one of the most recommended products, the MLC Mushkin Reactor, is a four year old commodity drive really says it all. Newer technologies all cost too much, have ugly side effects, or both. And let’s be honest here, it doesn’t really take TR’s epic 99th percentile analysis to conclude that QLC sucks or that 3DXPoint would be a big deal if only it wasn’t being held up by corporate shenanigans.

        PSU: Nothing major has happened, nothing major *will* happen. All but the most anal-retentive buyers only need concern themselves with the 80 Plus rating and whether the manufacturer is reasonably well established. Even wattage is irrelevant because 99% of the customers, including many enthusiasts, are only going to pull around 350W from a single efficient CPU/GPU/board and one or two hard drives.

        Case: It’s a case. It holds your stuff. It has a couple of fans to vent heat from the aforementioned efficient CPU/GPU/board, and may or may not have gamerbling. Any questions?

        Display: It’s like memory, you pick the resolution and refresh rate that gets your goat and then you’re set until either the monitor dies of old age, or you do. Plus monitor reviews have always been really sparse and subjective, owing to the nature of the thing.

        Keyboard/mouse/peripherals: Meh. Everyone and his dog has Cherry MX, not-terrible sensors, etc. It’s just a question of backlighting, build quality, and whether the hardware is hobbled by terrible drivers. Which are admittedly important questions, but also questions that random guys on Youtube and blogs are eager to answer.

          • DavidC1
          • 9 months ago

          “3DXPoint would be a big deal if only it wasn’t being held up by corporate shenanigans.”

          Just a tad.

          Rest are because 3D XPoint actually costs that much to produce. The talk is that Intel barely makes money on the 900P/905P drives. So that tells you a lot.

          This all ties in with the slowing advancements. But you can see it in a positive way. Even pleb computers are enough for everyone.

            • NovusBogus
            • 9 months ago

            It’s not so much the cost as it is the compatibility. It isn’t available on pleb computers because Intel wanted to use it as a wedge to drive CPU sales. Of course, Intel and Micron have gone their separate ways–almost undoubtedly the reason why, since Micron only wants to sell flash–but it’ll be a year or two before the Micron has something ready for market.

            • DavidC1
            • 9 months ago

            Ok, I can see the compatibility part. I think if they weren’t willling to offer it more than on Kabylake platforms, they should have made Pentium, and even Celeron chips be able to use it. There was a Tech Report article that said they might have recommended Optane Memory for their G4560 setup.

            In fact, I think it should have worked on Gemini Lake platforms too.

            Still, price is a big deal, especially nowadays when NAND prices are really dropping. This unfortunately is a much harder to solve problem. Volume does go a long way though, so artificial segmentation doesn’t help. There are numerous projects from Intel that probably died because of the blind “sell CPU” mentality.

            • DavidC1
            • 9 months ago

            Nevermind that. The latest Optane Memory driver supports Pentium and Celeron. Yay!

            [url<]https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/28649/Intel-Optane-Memory-User-Interface-and-Driver-for-System-Acceleration?product=35125[/url<] "Intel® Optane™ memory support extended to desktop Intel® Pentium™ and Intel® Celeron™ processors starting with Intel 8th generation systems and Intel® RST 17.2 driver or later. You must have the corresponding system BIOS for support. Consult your motherboard/system vendor for more information."

            • NovusBogus
            • 9 months ago

            Still locked to Kaby/Coffee though, and thus useless for everyone with a high end Haswell/Broadwell/Skylake setup. I’d love to be using it with my 6900K but it just isn’t an option, and NVMe is kind of meh for the price so commodity SATA it is! Likewise, I have a very legitimate use case for one of those things in my old workstation in the cube farm; the Star Citizen developers were Purportedly(tm) convinced to partner with Intel after measuring huge improvements in their game code’s compile time, and guess who else in this thread regularly deals with 1+ hour builds touching a vast number of files? The ease in which Intel enabled Optane on the lower orders of Kaby silicon just shows how the whole thing is pure gray-hat marketing.

            Unless Micron is high on potato fumes they’ll bring a chipset agnostic PCIe x16 solution to market by mid 2020. Record quarterly profits as gamers and early-adopter business clients eat that stuff up, followed by a blue team shareholder call where the CEO stutters his way through an explanation of how exactly they walked away from billions of dollars in revenue. Delicious.

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          That list is a verbose way of saying that PC Enthusiast market doesn’t matter anymore. It is all about marketing and following trends of the eCelebrity/Progamers. It has becoming little more than status symbols/vanity projects.

          The professionals typically go whatever OEM/ISV provides for their needs and don’t bother going the DIY route.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 9 months ago

          You forgot to add a UPS, bro.

      • Wirko
      • 9 months ago

      TR didn’t die on the day Scott left.

        • CScottG
        • 9 months ago

        No, but the ever-improving/innovative testing did.

        As did quite a bit of current product testing (..something Jeff seemed to have a very hard time with, though likely in part because of Scott moving to team “Red”.)

        -both of these aspects are still a “shadow” of what TR was.

        Techreport is NOT the same anymore, but for a *news aggregator it’s as good as it ever was – maybe better. ..and the Community is still pretty active.

        *nice job Colton!

          • blastdoor
          • 9 months ago

          [quote<]Techreport is NOT the same anymore, but for a *news aggregator it's as good as it ever was - maybe better. ..and the Community is still pretty active.[/quote<] I think you’re on to something there. Maybe it’s ok that it’s not the same anymore.... I’m not the same anymore, either — most people aren’t. Perhaps TR’s future could be to build on the strengths you identify there. Maybe add some analysis and informed commentary to the aggregation. One specific idea occurs to me — if YouTube videos are where a lot of the content is heading, I’d appreciate somebody watching them for me and distilling into text whatever useful info they might contain. I vastly prefer reading to watching video.

      • torquer
      • 9 months ago

      The world has changed, the audience has changed, the market has changed. Print media is a dying breed and for good or for ill everything is moving to YouTube. TR elected never to seriously make any moves with video the way other sites did.

      Don’t try to church it up as some kind of big conspiracy or greed or anything else. These guys have mouths to feed and lives to lead. I don’t blame any of them for doing whats best for them personally and neither should you.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 9 months ago

        Who said it’s a conspiracy besides you? I swear there are several independent arguments.

    • chuckula
    • 9 months ago

    [quote<]In somber news for the written PC journalist world, Kyle Bennett of cold HardOCP fame announced that he's "mothballing" his site and taking up a position as "Director of Enthusiast Engagement" at Intel. We wish Kyle all the best in his new position and, you know, if he and Intel want to engage enthusiasts at the TR BBQ this year, that's just fine with me. The announcement sparked a thread in the forums, and the importance of supporting independent review sites like TR quickly surfaced. I was able to offer a look behind the curtain at how things are going for TR in that thread and I encourage you to bring yourself up to speed by joining the discussion.[/quote<] My sub was up in about 2 weeks anyway, so check your top 10: [url<]https://techreport.com/subscriptions.x[/url<] I encourage you to get me out of the top 10!!

      • saturner
      • 9 months ago

      Down one notch.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 9 months ago

        How does Anonymous Gerbil have both spot 2 and spot 9?

          • kvndoom
          • 9 months ago

          [b<][i<]"We are EVERYWHERE."[/b<][/i<] -Anonymous

            • K-L-Waster
            • 9 months ago

            If the #2 and #9 entries were added together they would end up #1, so I’m not sure that being everywhere is all it’s cracked up to be….

      • anotherengineer
      • 9 months ago

      I encourage you to cut the trolling back to 1 per year, and I will consider it.

        • [+Duracell-]
        • 9 months ago

        But it wouldn’t be TR without chuckula’s [s<]trolling[/s<] entertaining banter.

          • Krogoth
          • 9 months ago

          Trolling?

          I call it entertainment and playful banter. Sometimes people need to relax and realize that they don’t need to go all “super serious” on silly pieces of silicon and circuitry. There are no sacred cows.

            • [+Duracell-]
            • 9 months ago

            Right, I don’t think trolling was the right word here.

            • atari030
            • 9 months ago

            I would use ‘chuckula’s [b<]antics[/b<]' - perhaps that's the right turn of phrase. I think there are a number of people who wouldn't call the entire 'body of work' playful, lol. Many would say playful, but not all.

      • Redocbew
      • 9 months ago

      Challenge accepted.

        • chuckula
        • 9 months ago

        For once I’m happy to be out of the top!

      • G8torbyte
      • 9 months ago

      Likewise my subsription was coming due. I’ve upped it and set it for recurring donation. Thanks again TR for the great content and hope it continues indefinetly.

      • Waco
      • 9 months ago

      As much as I’d love to, I have no way of doing so. 😛

      • leor
      • 9 months ago

      I’m #1 – double post

      • mikepers
      • 9 months ago

      Challenge accepted. You’ve been bumped! 🙂

    • Fonbu
    • 9 months ago

    Don’t forget. Ray Tracing coming to non RTX gpu’s and AMD gpu’s. Through DXR!

    • Rand
    • 9 months ago

    [i<]The announcement sparked a thread in the forums, and the importance of supporting independent review sites like TR quickly surfaced. I was able to offer a look behind the curtain at how things are going for TR in that thread and I encourage you to bring yourself up to speed by joining the discussion.[/i<] Translation for those who haven't followed the link: TechReport needs money and is really struggling. We need good content to read. There are increasingly few big enthusiast sites that are capable of providing serious analysis at the level we've grown accustomed to. TechReport happens to be the best of those sites that can do it (imo). Losing TechReport would thus be a very bad thing. Sparing a few dollars to support TechReport seems long it would go a long way right about now.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 months ago

      What? A news thread post from rand??? How long has it been?

        • Rand
        • 9 months ago

        I’m always around! I just seldom post. I visit TR almost every day.

      • Amien
      • 9 months ago

      I wish I had done better in life to be able to support my favourite creators in their time of difficulty.

      • blastdoor
      • 9 months ago

      I think I might have said this before, but I’ll say it again:

      Charge for downvotes on chuckula posts

      Ka-ching

      • Shouefref
      • 9 months ago

      All true, but unfortunately, lately I paid a huge sum to a group which needs a lawyer to defend their freedom of speech. They published an article about somebody for selling something which didnt live up to his promises, and now they’re in court. It’s not the first time. Previously it was a quack. They had won that case. Freedom of speech and therefore information is a problem sometimes.

      • Peldor
      • 9 months ago

      Live long and prosper, TR.

      I’ll kick a few bucks in.

    • Mr Bill
    • 9 months ago

    What! No [url=https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Dwarf_Bread<]Dwarven Battle Bread[/url<]?

    • Growler
    • 9 months ago

    Now that Kyle is at Intel, does that mean that he and Scott are now obligated to fight if they encounter each other?

      • Krogoth
      • 9 months ago

      HEAVEN OR HELL?

      LET’S ROCK!

        • RAGEPRO
        • 9 months ago

        GORILLA FATE IS TURNING!

          • dragontamer5788
          • 9 months ago

          CANT ESCAPE FROM CROSSING FATE

            • Krogoth
            • 9 months ago

            Scott (After defeating Kyle): “Go home and be a family man.”

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 9 months ago

      They’ll slug it out in a Rough N’ Rowdy show.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 9 months ago

        Rock ’em Sock ’em Corporate Representatives just kinda rolls off the tongue, don’t it?

      • Wirko
      • 9 months ago

      Maybe they can compete in sending stuff for review to TR.

    • Krogoth
    • 9 months ago

    La baguette!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 months ago

    I like that Kyle is going from being the troll to being the trolled. Director of Enthusiast Engagement sounds like a guy that hangs out in YouTube comment sections and Reddit all day, and I’d do it, too, for handsome sums of money.

      • euricog
      • 9 months ago

      I find it really weird that so many people dislike him (judging by this comment and multiple comments in the forum).

      For me, he’s one of the few writers with full-on integrity and with very low probability of selling out, as most hardware reviewers do in a heartbeat. I really really wish we had many more HardOCPs instead of the millions of completely untrustworthy sell-out crap (I would call out Tom’s HW as crap leader).

      Maybe I fail to see the reason he’s disliked, but for me it was a huge disappointment and pain to realize that there’ll be a HardOCP without Kyle.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 9 months ago

        That wasn’t meant to be a swipe at Kyle. He’s been trolling Nvidia pretty hard ever since the company quit supplying [H] with review samples, even managing to have release-day reviews from time to time. Now he’s going to work at Intel, who quite obviously like him, and people will be taking swipes at the “sell-out” or “corporate shill”.

          • euricog
          • 9 months ago

          I see what you mean, although I don’t agree with the trolling part. A troll harasses people for its own entertainment and the battle Kyle has with Nvidia is all but that. He made a stand by refusing to sign a mandatory NDA which effectively allowed Nvidia to gag/censor tech journalists.

          Unfortunately for tech journalism in general and for us tech readers, he was the only person willing to make a stand for the profit of transparency and unbiased reviews.

          This for me makes Kyle a freaking tech god and never a troll.

            • stefem
            • 9 months ago

            [quote<]He made a stand by refusing to sign a mandatory NDA which effectively allowed Nvidia to gag/censor tech journalists.[/quote<] Oh, c'mon please! the whole "NDA scandal" story was simply ridiculous, he screamed out shocked simply for what effectively an NDA is (and all are), I may understand that people that never read an NDA (even if one should learn before freaking out) could be worried or fooled by the legal jargon but not him, I've personally signed few (some in English other not) and I was really perplexed looking at the polemics and who jumped on the bandwagon but maybe I shouldn't have been, polemics (well-founded or baseless) draws more traffic on the website and with advertising paying less and less everyone are short on money (a widespread problem for journalism in general) but you can't trow out your ethics as it just worsen the problems. What you and he said is not true, GamerNexus even asked a specialized lawyer to explain to users it was just a normal NDA, but maybe you, Kyle and a lot of user that didn't even ever read an NDA know more than a specialist with years of study and experience and all who signed the NDA, TR included.

            • euricog
            • 9 months ago

            Kyle signed NDAs many times before, what he didn’t like about this one was the change that forced non-disclosure for 5 whole years:
            [url<]https://www.hardocp.com/news/2018/06/25/nvidia_looks_to_gag_journalists_multiyear_blanket_ndas[/url<] Also, before making his decision, he polled HardOCP's users about it: [url<]https://hardforum.com/threads/nvidia-nda-hardocp-poll.1966439/[/url<] (if you can't see the results, not signing it won with 68.2%) Meaning, HardOCP users preferred not to have the RTX reviewed by Kyle if it meant to sign that gagging NDA. Let's not forget that this started with Kyle [url=https://www.hardocp.com/article/2018/03/07/geforce_partner_program_impacts_consumer_choice<]exposing nVidia's GPP[/url<], which was another shitty deal for us consumers (for those who don't know, nVidia would give benefits to card companies that created this "special" line of nVidia GPUs but those companies would have to be nVidia exclusive, or in other words, would have to ditch any other GPU brands). In summary, another monopolistic tactic. This exposure THANKFULLY made nVidia drop the scheme. Now, had nVidia forced this 5 year NDA before GPP was reported to journalists, as it was part of "classified information", journalists who had signed it would be legally blocked from discussing it up to 5 years or until nVidia classified it as public (when it would be too late to prevent it).

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 9 months ago

        I always preferred his style of reviewing the most relevant to the real-world. “Which card can give me the best settings for enjoying gaming how I want to”. At the end of the day, that matters alot more than what numbers the cards produce at a single setting. The downside is that it is only 1 viewpoint. Others may have different trade-offs on framerate vs quality, or even within quality trade some AA for texture.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 9 months ago

          I agree with this for the most part. I don’t like that he converted frame times to FPS, because that’s not really what that data represents. But I liked the approach to doing apples-to-oranges and also apples-to-apples. Sometimes one is more relevant to the other.

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