WebKit’s JetStream browser benchmark hits version 2

I prefer applications that you download and run on your local machine, but I guess I'm old-fashioned because it seems like even most of those run in a browser these days. Browser performance on a lot of computers now is virtually synonymous with whole-machine performance. For that reason, we pay pretty close attention to browser benchmarks. Tests like Speedometer and JetStream help us gauge how quickly a machine can complete internet tasks—which is to say, most tasks. Not to belabor the point. In any case, we're pleased to see that the JetStream benchmark has gotten its second release.

If you're somehow not familiar with it already, JetStream is a browser benchmark published by the WebKit guys. You know, the guys behind the package that powers basically every browser now. It came out in 2014 and was the first browser benchmark to weight latency and throughput benchmarks equally. JetStream is an intensive test and isn't representative of simplistic websites. Instead, it's intended to measure the performance of a browser (and the machine it's running on) in "advanced web applications" such as games, and things like Slack.

Even though technology isn't moving as fast as it was around the turn of the millennium, 5 years is still a long time in tech terms, and a lot has changed about JavaScript in that time. JetStream 2, then, primarily serves as an update to the benchmark that reflects the changes to the way advanced web applications actually work now.

The new version uses 64 different-but-equally-weighted JavaScript and WebAssembly benchmarks that should offer a pretty good idea of a browser's (and by extension, a computer's) ability to handle stuff running in a browser that probably shouldn't be. You can read the WebKit blog post for all the juicy details if you're curious, or run the new benchmark over here. Don't forget to share your browser and OS versions along with your hardware specs if you discuss it in the comments below.

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    • rUmX
    • 9 months ago

    56 points on a S10+ Snapdragon 855 and Chrome 73.

    • setaG_lliB
    • 9 months ago

    120.576 on a 4930K @ 4.6GHz.
    Ivy Bridge-E, 32GB DDR3-2400 CL10, latest Chrome on Win7.

      • setaG_lliB
      • 9 months ago

      And here are a few more, all running Chrome 73:
      Core Duo T2500 (2 GHz Yonah 32-bit CPU, 2GB DDR2-667, Win7) = 27.419
      Core 2 Duo T5600 (1.83GHz Merom, 4GB DDR2-667, Win7) = 29.311
      Core 2 Duo E8600 (3.33GHz Wolfdale, 8GB DDR3-1333, Win7) = 62.794

      Win10 vs Ubuntu 18.04:
      Core i5 7200U (Kaby Lake, 2.5GHz base/3.1 Turbo, 16GB DDR4-2133, Win10) = 82.710
      Ubuntu = 83.901

      Kinda funny, seeing a 5.5 year old desktop absolutely slaughter my Kaby Lake laptop in what seems to be a lightly threaded benchmark. πŸ˜›

    • djayjp
    • 9 months ago

    39 on S9+ SD845 Chrome 73

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 9 months ago

    Latest Chrome release on both:

    Work laptop: 4c8t 7700hq. 16GB RAM:
    100.571

    Work Workstation: dual 16c32t Xeon 6130’s 32GB RAM:
    94.348

    • Krogoth
    • 9 months ago

    JETSTREAM ATTACK!

    /Whoever gets this wins a tube of Gorilla Glue

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 9 months ago

      Your [s<]BattleMech[/s<] [i<]Mobile Suit Gundam[/i<] is held together with Gorilla Glue?

        • Krogoth
        • 9 months ago

        Yep, the one 1:1 scale model is held together by good old Gorilla Glue. πŸ˜‰

    • Pancake
    • 9 months ago

    38.4 on my iPad Air 2.
    81.6 on my i5-3570 Win10 devbox with GTX970.
    77.0 on my Win10 HP Envy Ultrashmook with i5-8250U.

    Ahh, hmm… So, the FIVE YEAR OLD A8X in my iPad Air 2 is still punching well above it’s weight and still getting 10 hrs battery life. Would be interesting to see figures from a new-ish Smackbook running Safari…

    Edit: Windows shmooks running Chrome.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 months ago

      126.952 – Safari on a MacBook Pro 2017 with Core i7-7700HQ, 16 GB RAM, RX 555 graphics
      121.667 on the same Mac with Chrome 73.

    • synthtel2
    • 9 months ago

    [b<]68.365[/b<] on a 3.9 GHz 1700 w/o SMT, DDR4-3000 CL16 with aggressive tRRD/tFAW, Arch Linux (kernel 5.0.4), Firefox 66.0.1.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 months ago

      101.845 on an iPhone XR running Safari. My guess is that the browser still plays a huge role.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 9 months ago

        Score: 154.398
        Browser: Chrome 64-bit 73.0.3683.86 on Windows 10 x64 r1607
        System: i7-8700K @ 5.0 GHz, DDR4-3600 CL16

          • synthtel2
          • 9 months ago

          [b<]94.066[/b<] on Chromium 73, same everything else. Comparing that and FF 66, it looks like the median situation has FF a bit behind on the averages, keeping up well on firsts, and falling down badly on worsts. Firsts versus the others make it look like FF is just optimizing less aggressively on the first run. Worsts do look pretty bad, sometimes being down from Chromium by even a whole order of magnitude, and sometimes first is the best of the three numbers - maybe something about GC? Bomb-workers needs a special mention, because something repeatably goes very off the rails there in FF. Chromium gave 15.823 / 12.979 / 14.504, FF on this last run gave 22.321 / 0.135 / 2.381. FF actually leaves all cores very close to idle for a lot of time in that test. I'll try FF in Windows in a sec, that sounds like it could be an OS-specific kind of synchronization issue.

            • synthtel2
            • 9 months ago

            [b<]65.299[/b<] in FF 65.0.2 on Win10 1809. Bomb-workers only got weirder if anything: 49.020 / 0.130 / 2.466.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 9 months ago

            100.4 for FireFox 66.0.2 (64-bit) on my stock i7-9700K, Windows 10.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 9 months ago

            127.9 for my stock i7-9700K with Chrome 73.0

          • auxy
          • 9 months ago

          156.384 on the same version of Chrome and Windows. Score is really close, probly margin-of-error close. Then again, we have almost the same system, hehe. i7-8086K @ 5.0 GHz all-core, using DDR4-3933 CL17.

          You and me don’t have Meltdown patch so I wonder if that is why we are scoring so high. Ξ£(‘Ο‰’;) Or maybe uBlock is messing with the test.

        • blastdoor
        • 9 months ago

        66.42 on an iPhone 7+, safari,iOS 12.1

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 9 months ago

          88.9 for Safari on an iPhone 8+

            • blastdoor
            • 9 months ago

            85.958 On an iPad Pro, A10X

      • prb123
      • 9 months ago

      84.514 on 3.1GHz E3-1220 v3 w/ 8GB DDR3. Chrome – 73.0.3683.86 (64-bit).
      55.501 – Same system. FireFox 66.0.1 (64-bit).

        • auxy
        • 9 months ago

        It seems to favor Chrome and Safari.
        Hmm… WebKit benchmark favoring WebKit browsers…
        … it’s a conspiracy! ( οΎŸΠ”οΎŸ)

      • EzioAs
      • 9 months ago

      58.305 on a stock speed i5-3570K, 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9, Windows 10 1809, Firefox 66.0.2

      • wingless
      • 9 months ago

      125.587 on a 5.0Ghz Core-i7 8700K, DDR4-3600 CL18 on Google Chrome Version 73.0.3683.86 (Official Build) (64-bit)

      • tay
      • 9 months ago

      118.599 on a 2018 Macbook Pro 13″ with i5-8259U on Safari (16 GB LPDDR3). I didn’t quit any programs other than Visual Studio Code which is a pig. Great machine highly recommended despite the crap keyboard.

    • chuckula
    • 9 months ago

    I had a Jetstream oven once.

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