Rumor: VideoCardz leaks specifications for 75W GeForce GTX 1650


We all like to salivate over the capabilities of high-end graphics cards. The reality is that most folks—perhaps even most gerbils, these days—are going to end up with something more affordable in their machines. The GeForce GTX 1050 Ti was a killer value when it launched, but it's looking a bit long in the tooth these days, so it's terrifically convenient that Nvidia's got the next model ready, according to VideoCardz. The site claims to have the full specifications for the GeForce GTX 1650.

Graphics card GPU Shader
count
Core clock
(Boost)
Memory
config
Memory
clock
Memory
bandwidth
TDP
GeForce GTX 1050 Ti GP107 768 1392 MHz GDDR5
128-bit
8 GT/s 112 GB/s 75 W
GeForce GTX 1060 6GB GP106 1280 1706 MHz GDDR5
192-bit
8 GT/s 192 GB/s 120 W

GeForce GTX 1650
(speculated)

TU117 896 1665 MHz GDDR5
128-bit
8 GT/s 112 GB/s 75 W
GeForce GTX 1660 TU116 1408 1785 MHz GDDR5
192-bit
8 GT/s 192 GB/s 120 W
GeForce GTX 1660 Ti TU116 1536 1770 MHz GDDR6
192-bit
12 GT/s 288 GB/s 120 W
Radeon RX 580 Polaris 20 2304 1340 MHz GDDR5
256-bit
8 GT/s 256 GB/s 225 W

As should probably be obvious from the (goofy) name, this card comes from the "Turing without ray-tracing" family. It sits just below the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti as well as the the GTX 1660 (non-Ti) that was released last month. According to Videocardz, the new model is based on a chip called "TU117-300." As that site points out, the -300 affix is usually used for cut-down chips, so it's possible this isn't the only time we'll see the TU117.

In case I didn't make it clear before, Videocardz expects that the new GPU will slot into systems without extra power connectors, just like the GTX 1050 Ti before it. Assuming Videocardz' specs are correct, it's a lot of GPU to cram into a slot-powered package: 896 shader cores boosting up to 1665 MHz at stock (and probably a lot higher in practice), hooked up to 4 GB of GDDR5 memory running at 8 GT/sec over a 128-bit bus.

Overall, it sounds pretty similar to the GP107 chip that powered the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti—aside from the drastically higher core clock, of course. It's also worth noting that despite lacking ray-tracing or (functional) tensor cores, the GTX 1600-series is still based on Turing. That means buyers get improved efficiency, as well as better performance in DX12 games thanks to architectural changes focused on improving exactly that—as demonstrated in reviews like this one.

The biggest complaint about Nvidia's Turing GPUs is that they made relatively little mark on the price-performance curve. Assuming VideoCardz' data is correct, the GTX 1650 might fare a little better. Judging by its supposed specifications we expect it to come in well ahead of its predecessor, yet it will purportedly be priced at just $150. We'll know more for sure when the cards hit, which VideoCardz claims will be on April 23—just a week away. In the meantime, you can head over there to see some pictures of the upcoming cards.

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