Rumor: VideoCardz leaks specifications for 75W GeForce GTX 1650

We all like to salivate over the capabilities of high-end graphics cards. The reality is that most folks—perhaps even most gerbils, these days—are going to end up with something more affordable in their machines. The GeForce GTX 1050 Ti was a killer value when it launched, but it's looking a bit long in the tooth these days, so it's terrifically convenient that Nvidia's got the next model ready, according to VideoCardz. The site claims to have the full specifications for the GeForce GTX 1650.

Graphics card GPU Shader

count

Core clock

(Boost)

Memory

config

Memory

clock

Memory

bandwidth

TDP
GeForce GTX 1050 Ti GP107 768 1392 MHz GDDR5

128-bit

8 GT/s 112 GB/s 75 W
GeForce GTX 1060 6GB GP106 1280 1706 MHz GDDR5

192-bit

8 GT/s 192 GB/s 120 W

GeForce GTX 1650

(speculated)

TU117 896 1665 MHz GDDR5

128-bit

8 GT/s 112 GB/s 75 W
GeForce GTX 1660 TU116 1408 1785 MHz GDDR5

192-bit

8 GT/s 192 GB/s 120 W
GeForce GTX 1660 Ti TU116 1536 1770 MHz GDDR6

192-bit

12 GT/s 288 GB/s 120 W
Radeon RX 580 Polaris 20 2304 1340 MHz GDDR5

256-bit

8 GT/s 256 GB/s 225 W

As should probably be obvious from the (goofy) name, this card comes from the "Turing without ray-tracing" family. It sits just below the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti as well as the the GTX 1660 (non-Ti) that was released last month. According to Videocardz, the new model is based on a chip called "TU117-300." As that site points out, the -300 affix is usually used for cut-down chips, so it's possible this isn't the only time we'll see the TU117.

In case I didn't make it clear before, Videocardz expects that the new GPU will slot into systems without extra power connectors, just like the GTX 1050 Ti before it. Assuming Videocardz' specs are correct, it's a lot of GPU to cram into a slot-powered package: 896 shader cores boosting up to 1665 MHz at stock (and probably a lot higher in practice), hooked up to 4 GB of GDDR5 memory running at 8 GT/sec over a 128-bit bus.

Overall, it sounds pretty similar to the GP107 chip that powered the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti—aside from the drastically higher core clock, of course. It's also worth noting that despite lacking ray-tracing or (functional) tensor cores, the GTX 1600-series is still based on Turing. That means buyers get improved efficiency, as well as better performance in DX12 games thanks to architectural changes focused on improving exactly that—as demonstrated in reviews like this one.

The biggest complaint about Nvidia's Turing GPUs is that they made relatively little mark on the price-performance curve. Assuming VideoCardz' data is correct, the GTX 1650 might fare a little better. Judging by its supposed specifications we expect it to come in well ahead of its predecessor, yet it will purportedly be priced at just $150. We'll know more for sure when the cards hit, which VideoCardz claims will be on April 23—just a week away. In the meantime, you can head over there to see some pictures of the upcoming cards.

Comments closed
    • albundy
    • 12 months ago

    The GeForce GTX 1050 Ti was a killer value

    i wouldnt say value. i think it was a card that cost twice as much as it was worth. bottom of the barrel doesnt always equate to value. and the trend continues.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 12 months ago

      With mining, I probably paid for my 1050Ti easily 2 if not 3 times.

        • NTMBK
        • 12 months ago

        Congratulations on helping to kill the planet

    • DPete27
    • 12 months ago

    AMDs Navi RX3080, RX3070, and RX3060 are going to be the ones to change the price performance curve if anything. Nvidia has nothing to prove.

      • Krogoth
      • 12 months ago

      At best, Navi will probably go toe to toe with TU116 SKUs and cause price pressure on TU106 SKUs. It’ll partly restore competition in the mid-range market but higher-end portions of the market will remain static.

        • chuckula
        • 12 months ago

        Navi was the Chosen One!

        It was supposed to restore balance to the GPU force, not let Ngreedia stay in business!

          • Krogoth
          • 12 months ago

          Navi as it burns up from massive overvolting: “I HATE GLUE!”

    • hungarianhc
    • 12 months ago

    This is basically the exact graphics card I would want for my eGPU Mac Mini… Really hoping that Apple adds NVDA support at WWDC this year!

    • techguy
    • 12 months ago

    This would be the perfect card to throw in my Plex server. Assuming, of course, the full Turing NVENC implementation is present, and exposed for use. Beats having to spend $220 on a 1660 for the exact same feature set and performance (for my use case).

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 12 months ago

    This would be a great candidate for a review.

      • Leader952
      • 12 months ago

      Best not to get your hope up as reviews here are either late or not at all.

      Still waiting for the GTX 1660/1660 Ti review.

    • not@home
    • 12 months ago

    A little off topic but, did anyone else have an overwhelming urge to play Civ V after hearing about the Notre Dame fire?

      • PDM
      • 12 months ago

      No. But I did get into KF2 “Burning Paris” for a bit.
      However, it was not good to hear such a venerable piece of history was so horribly damaged by fire.

    • Chrispy_
    • 12 months ago

    Unless power consumption is the key requirement for a buyer, it’s going to be tough sell against the 3GB 1060 which has a 30% shader count and boost clock advantage, and the 3GB 1060 itself is already a hard sell compared to the RX 570 which goes from the ‘egg and places like Microcenter for just $130 [i<]before[/i<] discounts, coupons, sales etc. Also, unlike the 3GB 1060, the Polaris architecture in the RX 570 is true DX12 hardware, rather than a DX11 design with emulation of DX12 features, so in that respect Turing's perceived advantage over Pascal as DX12 engines become more common isn't really an advantage over Polaris which will also open up a performance gap over Pascal. I'm curious to see what TDP Navi launches at. Not that it really matters too much on a desktop but it would be nice if they didn't turn the power consumption up to 11 for a change....

      • Goty
      • 12 months ago

      I’d love to see a clock-for-clock comparison between some Pascal and Turing parts in order to get some idea of the performance uplift they were able to achieve between the architectures. The 1060 and 1660 would be good candidates for this sort of test given the relatively small difference in shader count and identical memory bandwidth.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 12 months ago

      You’re not wrong about any of that, but lemme offer a counterpoint:

      Refurbished HP with 4C Kaby Lake chip and NVMe SSD: [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIAJV291B8447<]$450[/url<] Throw in a GeForce GTX 1650 for $150 and you're out $600 for a really solid gaming PC experience at 1080p with extremely little fuss.

        • Chrispy_
        • 12 months ago

        I guess so, but if you’re buying an OEM machine like that anything you’re setting yourself up for misery in the long run.

        Motherboards that will never see a single BIOS update and with near-zero configuration
        Power supplies that are woeful and optimistic about their output
        Bargain-basement component quality that is designed to be as cheap as possible to survive the warranty period.

        I’ve worked on hundreds, nay thousands of HP and Dell office PCs and it never ceases to amaze me how low quality those things are. Corrosion on board traces within two years of air-conditioned office; Cheap chinese electrolytic capacitors that wouldn’t be seen on anything other than a [s<]PC Chips[/s<] ECS motherboard; weird proprietary connectors and layouts; missing features that the chipset supports but were never connected because that's not on the feature list. As bad as those are, they're a significant step up from the cheapo consumer PCs which are just as bad but flimsier and not built for quick or easy service by on-site warranty callouts. I think if you're picking up a 3+ year old office PC used, you're excused since those things rarely command more than half their original price, but to buy something like that new is a false economy IMO. Each to their own, but I'm pretty sure you can get a better machine than that for $600. I'd suggest you look at a used PC if you can't afford a decent one new. Skylake i7 workstations with PSUs designed to take multiple quadro cards are just starting to appear on 3-year ex lease for a steal. I'd never even consider a bargain-basement, stamped tin POS over something like that.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 12 months ago

          The linked machine is refurbished, not new.

            • Chrispy_
            • 12 months ago

            Heh, that’s not a point I’d argue in its favour – there are new builds on the ‘egg of that spec from Acer, Lenovo and Dell for $450-480 without even touching refurbs 😉

            Not that it’s what you’re suggesting but I think we all know you throw a way a lot of the budget for the convenience of a pre-built. As a five-minute excercise to satisfy my curiousity, most gerbils will be unsurprised to learn that $410 at Newegg will get your the parts for a superior spec PC all new, with full warranty – using name-brand parts, real driver and firmware support, configurable BIOS options, and important quality checks such as 80+ certification.

            $25 Rosewill mATX case of arguably better quality.
            $33 Rosewill 80+ certified 400W PSU
            $190 i5 7400
            $50 Asrock H310 motherboard
            $34 Teamgroup DDR4
            $32 Patriot NVME SSD
            $30 HGST 1TB SATA drive
            $16 Asus DVDRW

            I would deduct $50 from that budget if I were willing to buy a $30 case+psu combo of the low standard those prebuilts come with, and source an unbranded, barely-supported H110 board from AliExpress for $20. Man, it’s depressing that OEMs actually bother doing such damage to a machine for the sake of mere fractions of a cent on the dollar :\

      • derFunkenstein
      • 12 months ago

      Power consumption might not be the key, exactly, but low consumption makes it a candidate for low-profile designs. There are low-profile 1050s because those don’t need external power. This would be the fastest low-profile GPU around, if that matters. It’ll matter to folks with Dell or HP SFF designs with half-height slots.

        • chuckula
        • 12 months ago

        Another advantage of not requiring an extra PCIe power cable is that practically any system with a PCIe slot free can take the card and deliver power to it even with a POS OEM PSU.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 12 months ago

          Yeah, that’s basically what RAGEPRO covered. A cheap OEM PC + a 1650 would be a decent experience for cheap.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 12 months ago

        This. For anyone who has a spare 6 or 8 pin power connector this card isn’t all that attractive, but if you [i<]don't[/i<], this looks enticing.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 12 months ago

          I have spare but I need more slots. I wish it was a Ti to go with my 1080 Ti and 1050Ti. Will wait for Ti version.

        • Chrispy_
        • 12 months ago

        It’s a nice idea but in reality of the two dozen attempts to do just this over my career using surplus from work, or colleague’s personal low-profile SFF designs with half-height slots – I’ve only found a couple that convincingly took a PCIe graphics card of reasonable potency.

        In some cases it was because they put the PCIe x16 slot at the bottom, so even a single-slot card won’t really work because the heatsink/fan actually touches the bottom/edge/PSU or whatever. Airflow isn’t possible, not that those things have any airflow in the first place.

        Secondly, a common problem is compatibility. x16 slots don’t have to provide 75W of power if they’re not electrically x16 slots. I’ve run into several full-length x4 slots rated to only 25W. Even if you have a 75W-capaple x16 slot in an SFF machine, the next assumption that fails is that the BIOS supports a modern UEFI graphics card and will also boot from it. Many SFF boards have BIOSes that were never expecting a GPU other than the IGP, so PCIe graphics are simply not coded as an option.

        Finally, and my favourite issue, is that these things are often fitted with miserable power supplies. Typically they’re in the 100-200W range, but often it’s 140W or so which is plenty of headroom for a 65W CPU and a couple of fans and drives. Throw a 75W GPU in there and you’ll think everything’s fine until you load the 12V rails with simultaneous CPU+GPU load so that PSU suffers a voltage droop and you get an unwelcome hard reset.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 12 months ago

      DX12 doesn’t replace DX11. It’s a low level API. MS is really bad at naming things

        • Beahmont
        • 12 months ago

        That’s not entirely correct. Anything DX11 can do DX12 can do and do it with almost the same code. DX12 isn’t a low level API directly, it will run at what ever extraction level you want it to, it just allows for low level tuning unlike DX10 and DX11 where you physically could not do low level tuning at the API level and had to use abstractions. DX12 allows developers to do All High, all Low, or mixed abstraction levels in contrast to the last low level DX API in DX9.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 12 months ago

          Then why does DX11 still exist and got an API bump when DX12 came out

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 12 months ago

            Graphics are not my area of expertise, but “almost the same code” still suggests there were breaking changes.

      • Freon
      • 12 months ago

      Street price will slot in where it makes sense.

      1060 supply will dry up.

    • chuckula
    • 12 months ago

    Quoth the Krogoth “Alwaysmeh”
    Much I marvelled this ungainly troll to hear discourse so plainly,
    Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 12 months ago

      Nicely said.

      • Krogoth
      • 12 months ago

      Alias poor Glue, I knew you well.

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