Intel fills out its roster of ninth-generation desktop and mobile Core CPUs

As it happens, it's not just Nvidia that's popping out some new products this week. With relatively little fanfare, Intel's dropped the rest of the ninth-generation Core series on us yesterday. That includes the remainder of the current series' desktop lineup—mostly multiplier-locked and lower-end chips—as well as a full lineup of laptop processors. Let's have a look at the mobile parts first.

Intel's launching six new mobile Core processors, all from the Core i5, Core i7, and Core i9 families. The segmentation is fairly straightforward. All six chips have Hyper-Threading enabled, and the core counts scale evenly up the range: Core i5s have four cores, i7s have six cores, and i9s have eight cores. Surprisingly, all the ninth-generation mobile Core processors come stamped with a 45 W TDP even though the top-end model, the unlocked-for-overclocking Core i9-9980HK, sports 16 threads, 16 MB of L3 cache, and a maximum single-core turbo clock of 5 GHz.

The two new Core i9 CPUs include support for Thermal Velocity Boost (TVB). To recap, Intel describes TVB as "a feature that opportunistically increases clock frequency above single-core and multi-core Turbo Boost Technology frequencies based on how much the processor is operating below its maximum temperature and whether turbo power budget is available." If that sounds familiar, it's because it's an analog to AMD's eXtended Frequency Range (XFR) functionality. In practice, it means these chips could run 200 MHz faster than advertised as long as they're under 50°C. That low a CPU temperature seems unlikely in a gaming laptop under a heavy load, but TVB should  kick in often enough when the processor's not too busy.

 

On the desktop side, there are a lot more new chips. Multiplier-locked versions of the Core i9-9900K, Core i7-9700, and Core i5-9600—processors that in past days would have been suffixed with an "S" indicating their 65 W TDP—come along with a pile of Core i3 CPUs. Intel is also launching a series of 35-W "T" processors, and a number of new Pentium Gold and Celeron chips. You can see the new desktop CPUs highlighted in yellow on a darker blue background above and below.

As seen before with the Core i3-9350KF, it seems the entire ninth-generation Core i3 family is equipped with Turbo Boost. Core i3 CPUs historically didn't have Turbo and simply ran at their full speed any time they were not idling. Now, it seems "Core i3" has become shorthand for "quad-core" in the new lineup. The core count pattern is the same as with the laptop chips: Core i5s have six cores and Core i7s have eight. Unlike the mobile processors, though, Hyper-Threading is all but completely absent here outside of the top-end Core i9 CPUs.

Stepping down from the Core i-series chips, it looks like the Pentium Gold and Celeron processors still haven't gotten the Turbo Boost treatment. This area is pretty clearly segmented too, for once: Pentium Gold chips are dual-core chips with Hyper-Threading, while Celerons do without the feature.

Interestingly, all of the above processors have gained Optane Memory support. It's not the higher-end version of the feature that allows Optane DIMMs; rather, Intel is simply no longer preventing folks buying budget CPUs from pairing said chips with Optane M.2 drives intended for disk caching. That's a nice little win, as we've always felt that technology was best-suited for ultra-low-cost machines anyway.

As usual, Intel lays out recommended customer prices for all of the desktop CPUs. Going over the list, there really aren't any surprises here; everything is pretty much in line with the pricing established by the already-released ninth-generation chips. You can probably expect the street prices on the low-power "T"-chips to be higher than recommended owing to their relative rarity. It will be interesting to see what effect AMD's third-generation Ryzen processors have on these prices when they launch later this year.

Comments closed
    • wownwow
    • 4 months ago

    A reminder: Ninth-generation “Spoiler Inside” CPUs, still no fix for “Spoiler”!

    • ronch
    • 4 months ago

    So having an F means the IGP is.. er… F’ed???

    • DPete27
    • 4 months ago

    Not only is Intel losing their CPU lead, but they’re doing themselves a further disservice with 9th Gen by not supplying a full range of mobos that natively support them. Z390 is comically expensive, B365 availability is nearly zero.
    Not to mention all these new late additions, assuming they’ll need a BIOS update to add support.

    The whole non-CPU BIOS update ability REALLY needs to trickle down from the premium tier.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 months ago

      How hard would be it be to add a failsafe mode to a new CPU so that it can at least POST in a super-crippled, lowest-common-denominator microcode version to allow BIOS updates?

      The onus shouldn’t be on board vendors to flash the latest BIOS because there will ALWAYS be stock in the retail channel that missed the boat. The blame really lies with AMD and Intel for making a new processor that is claimed “compatible” with older boards but in a Catch-22 kind of way that is technically compatible but incompatible in many common situations.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 4 months ago

        It [i<]does[/i<] seem pretty odd that the mobo needs to know more than a few general parameters of the CPU, seems like the CPU that goes in a given socket should just conform to a standard behavior then boom, they all work.

    • Spunjji
    • 4 months ago

    I’m… “impressed” by the sheer dedication to artificial product segmentation on display here.

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 months ago

    Wow, I remember when the Pentium G4560 was a good deal two years ago, in the Pre-Ryzen era.

    Intel seem to be ignoring the existence of the the Athlon 200GE which makes all those Celerons look like inefficient, crippled, overpriced solutions lacking what are now considered ‘standard’ features for everything else.

    With the Ryzen G starting at $99 for 4C/8T with Vega IGPs, the Pentium Golds all look like a false economy too.

      • Spunjji
      • 4 months ago

      I completely agree, but for Intel, deliberately making a crap product lets them continue to maximise their margins.

      The truth is that these CPUs aren’t really in competition with AMD: all they have to do is be the cheapest CPU in Intel’s lineup and they’ll sell like hotcakes. Their marketing has seen to that.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 4 months ago

      Last we heard Intel wasn’t able to make enough chips to meet demand, so they were focusing on higher margin parts. Why make a $99 bargain chip instead of making Xeons where the margin is 2 – 3 times that?

        • ermo
        • 4 months ago

        Intel Marketing & Sales: “Because reasons.”

        • The Egg
        • 4 months ago

        Yeap. I was reading about how Intel is going back to using 22nm for some of their chipsets because they’re so strapped for 14nm capacity (and they probably make squat on a chipset).

        If I were Intel, I’d probably be doing this all the time, whenever it saved money. Not like a chipset needs the latest and greatest manufacturing tech.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 4 months ago

        If they let AMD have the low end like that, some vendors would presumably switch to AMD for products in which the range of CPUs goes from cheap to rather expensive on the same motherboard.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 4 months ago

    The usefulness of those 8 core mobile parts fill follow almost entirely from how effective they are at turboing 1-4 of those cores, IMO. The base clock is not a very inspiring number, naturally.

    Also I suppose it would be interesting if the larger L3 was more effective than the 8MB we had for years.

      • Goty
      • 4 months ago

      I think they should be able to sustain that single core boost long enough to make a pretty decent improvement in responsiveness given the 45W TDP.

    • NovusBogus
    • 4 months ago

    …where the hell are the Xeons? I’m tired of waiting for an actual successor to the ECC enabled quad channel Skylakes.

      • blastdoor
      • 4 months ago

      Apparently 10nm Xeons are right around the corner, now that Intel’s wise and brave leaders escaped the clutches of the evil Tim Cook, who was going to force Intel to make 5g modems for iPhones in a sweatshop in China.

      • Goty
      • 4 months ago

      Intel says you’ll take your 100 MHz clock bump and you’ll LIKE IT!

        • adamlongwalker
        • 4 months ago

        And you will continue to pay the Intel tax. Yea I had a few friends working in Intel land. The stories I could tell you, but they would put a hit squad on me. impaling me with hundreds of their CPU’s all over my body. Death by a thousand pins gives a new meaning of “plug me in”.

          • Voldenuit
          • 4 months ago

          If they were trying to impale you with pins they’d have to use Z390 motherboards, not CPUs.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 months ago

      There are Coffee-Lake Xeons branded as Xeon-E units. I suspect that Coffee Lake R based units are around around the corner and Intel is going to launch them around the same time as official desktop Zen2 debut.

    • synthtel2
    • 4 months ago

    The Pentiums are still missing AVX.

      • Concupiscence
      • 4 months ago

      Its absence gets more conspicuous and awkward every refresh. Maybe – just [i<]maybe[/i<] - Sunny Cove will make AVX/AVX2 standard and reserve AVX-512 for the big chips, but I'm still not willing to put money on that.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 months ago

      Gotta justify that premium for i3 SKUs……

      • Kretschmer
      • 4 months ago

      Do Pentium buyers know or care?

        • Waco
        • 4 months ago

        That’s not really the point – devs can’t release software with it enabled by default until it’s prevalent. Shit like this keeps it from becoming ubiquitous.

        • synthtel2
        • 4 months ago

        No (it isn’t even mentioned in newsposts like this after all) and probably no from a present-day performance perspective, but they should care about how quickly software is going to start making AVX a hard requirement the moment Intel gets over this.

        Also what Waco said. This stunt is really annoying to have to support.

        • Spunjji
        • 4 months ago

        I see those both as reasons why support should be added. If the people who don’t know anything about it aren’t getting it, then end result is to hold back universal support for the people who *do* care on behalf of those who don’t.

    • freebird
    • 4 months ago

    A lot of CHECKS on those images… a few more possibly, if the new leaked Intel roadmap is accurate:
    [url<]https://wccftech.com/intel-desktop-mobile-cpu-roadmap-leak-14nm-comet-lake-10nm-ice-lake-tiger-lake/[/url<] Thes one needs translation: [url<]https://tweakers.net/nieuws/151984/roadmap-toont-dat-intel-in-2021-nog-desktop-cpus-op-14nm-maakt.html[/url<] Desktop on 14nm+++ until approx. 2022 CHECK AMD beating Intel to 7nm/10nm CHECK Cove Arch. Mobile only until approx 2022 CHECK AMD "Winning!" (as Charlie Sheen would say) CHECK MATE! The road from Rome to Milan will be laid with unsold Intel Xeons... ; ) The should rename this the AMD train ride... [url<]https://www.italiarail.com/pages/routes/rome-to-milan[/url<]

      • chuckula
      • 4 months ago

      YOU’RE SO RIGHT!

      WE’VE CANCELLED ALL NEW PRODUCTS!

      IN FACT, WE’RE BRINGING THE PENTIUM 4 BACK BECAUSE WE’RE NOW ONLY TARGETING THE RETRO MARKET!

        • freebird
        • 4 months ago

        You’re so funny I up voted you!! 😀

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 4 months ago

        Intel doesn’t like to say cancelled. The phrase is “strategically positioned to align with market demand.”

        In other words, Zen 2 will make current Intel CPUs irrelevant, and with Intel’s failed 10nm manufacturing, producing more than 20 fully functioning CPUs per day is impossible. Intel is being conservative with 2022.

      • blastdoor
      • 4 months ago

      I wonder how far Intel can drive 14nm until they run out of gas… it’s kind of thrilling to watch and find out!

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuEdU_lrtZk[/url<]

        • freebird
        • 4 months ago

        Hard to know exactly, Intel won’t be using EUV in 10nm, so since they changed the 10nm process to be more manufacturing friendly, they should be able to get product out the door late this year or early next, but the process might not be as dense as earlier predicted.

        The BIGGER PROBLEM for Intel is EUV and 7nm; when combined “Worlds will start colliding…”
        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBZVaNpwub8[/url<] [b<]What we do know is that Intel is falling behind TSMC (and most likely Samsung also) on acquiring EUV (NXE:3400B) equipment from ASML.[/b<] Considering that Samsung has already entered 7nm EUV production [url<]https://www.anandtech.com/show/13496/samsung-starts-mass-production-of-chips-using-its-7nm-euv-process-tech[/url<] and TSMC 7nm+ (EUV) will enter production in June of this year. [url<]https://www.tomshardware.com/news/tsmc-7nm-euv-mass-production,39071.html[/url<] In addition, TSMC has 60% of the orders for ASML EUV machines that ASML can make in 2019. [url<]https://www.elinfor.com/news/tsmc-purchases-lithography-machines-with-22-billion-for-the-second-generation-7nm-mass-production-making-apple-and-huawei-being-overjoyed-p-11016[/url<] and Samsung is planning more purchases this year. ASML shipped 20 machines in 2018 and can only make 30 in 2019. [url<]https://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1333492[/url<] If Samsung & TSMC are putting it into production now, they must have bought the majority of EUV machines in 2018. Therefore, they are getting to know how to "manufacture" with EUV and working out the bugs which takes time... something Intel will have to catch up on to get their 7nm out the door, which I don't see happening before 2022. Background: According to Wikipedia: As of 2016, 12 units were forecast to ship in 2017,[237] and 24 units in 2018.[232] However, the shipment forecast for 2017 was halved at the beginning of the year to six or seven units.[238] The NXE:3350B is planned to be discontinued by 2017, to be replaced by the NXE:3400B. At the time of shipping of the first NXE:3400B,[239] eight NXE:3300B and six NXE:3350B systems were up and working in the field.[240] A total of ten NXE3400B systems were shipped in 2017.[241] In Q1 2018, three EUV systems were shipped.[242] IN Q2 2018, 4 more were shipped.[243]

          • blastdoor
          • 4 months ago

          It sure will be interesting to watch EUV unfold.

          Maybe the whole thing will be a total bust and Intel will end up looking very smart for not having invested nearly as much in it. Maybe we’re at the end of the road in terms of process improvements. Maybe Intel 14nm/10nm and TSMC 10nm/7nm really is going to be it.

          Alternatively, Intel might be falling into an IBM mindset, constantly retreating to higher-margin niches and ultimately selling off their fabs. We’ll see.

            • Redocbew
            • 4 months ago

            EUV has been “unfolding” for over a decade. You might be waiting a while still.

    • jackbomb
    • 4 months ago

    Man, those Celerons!
    You know what else had 2C/2T, 2MB of cache, no Turbo, and ran at 3GHz? My Pentium D 830…in 2005!

      • Goty
      • 4 months ago

      I think this calls for a head-to-head!

        • Klimax
        • 4 months ago

        That size and scaling on those graphs will be astronomical…

          • Goty
          • 4 months ago

          That’s why God gave us log plots!

            • Klimax
            • 4 months ago

            I don’t think even Log God can save that.

            😉

    • jihadjoe
    • 4 months ago

    But where’s the KFC?!

      • Krogoth
      • 4 months ago

      The Colonel demanded too much of a heated cut. The integrated graphics weren’t enough….

    • Sahrin
    • 4 months ago

    Zero graphics, zero discount.

      • chuckula
      • 4 months ago

      Intel charges zero markup for including integrated graphics.

      • Voldenuit
      • 4 months ago

      Think of the dark silicon as just an integrated heatspreader!

      • NTMBK
      • 4 months ago

      But it means that Intel can still chips with failed GPUs that would otherwise have gone in the bin.

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 months ago

        …allowing Intel to sell their entire product catalog at lower prices to the end-user.

        Oh, wait.

          • chuckula
          • 4 months ago

          It is for lower prices if you understood supply & demand.

          And that applies even if they charge the same amount for both chips.

      • cygnus1
      • 4 months ago

      AKA Intel Graphics are worthless.

      • The Egg
      • 4 months ago

      Microcenter only charges $159 for the 9400F though, which is a heck of a bang for your buck on a 6/6 CPU

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 months ago

      This really bugs me about the F series.

      I can only assume that the F stands for “F… YOU!” from Intel.

      • DPete27
      • 4 months ago

      MSRP doesn’t reflect it, but the non-IGP models can be had at a noticeable discount @ retail.

    • chuckula
    • 4 months ago

    I’m not saying that Icelake is cancelled but …

    [s<]IT WAS AlIENS[/s<] I mean Icelake is cancelled!!

      • Krogoth
      • 4 months ago

      Ice Lake will be reborn as Inferno Lake! Hotter than the surface of the sun!

      • freebird
      • 4 months ago

      Because Global Warming (from TSMC making all those 7nm Zen2 chiplets) caused it to “melt” away…

    • Krogoth
    • 4 months ago

    IT IS THE GLUE-ALYPSE!

    INHEAT’S 10NM FABS ARE ON FIRE! 14nm ∞+ FOREVER!

    AMD AND LISA SHOULD JUST THROW IN THE TOWEL AND ERECT THE WHITE FLAG FOR THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY. IT WILL BECOME THEIR DAY OF DEFEAT!

      • chuckula
      • 4 months ago

      You paid shill!

      Intel’s 10nm fabs aren’t on fire.

      BECAUSE THEY ONLY EVER EXISTED IN YOUR IMAGINATION!

      • freebird
      • 4 months ago

      A BIG WHITE NAPKIN is what she’ll need after eating Intel’s Xeons for breakfast, lunch and dinner from Q3 2019 to ???? (foreseeable future) She better get a very health exercise routine to prevent heavy weight “revenue” gain.

      To Chuckula: Don’t worry, Intel will still sell a few Cascades for AVX-512 favorable workloads…

    • Neutronbeam
    • 4 months ago

    CHUCKULA DIDN’T POST FIRST! CONSPIRACY BY INTEL CONFIRMED!

      • drfish
      • 4 months ago

      He didn’t go away, so he was replaced by a very small shill script.

        • Goty
        • 4 months ago

        Made me choke on my apple… +1

          • Klimax
          • 4 months ago

          PROOF THAT MACS ARE UNHEALTHY FOR YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

            • K-L-Waster
            • 4 months ago

            Must have been eating it wrong….

            • freebird
            • 4 months ago

            Eating too many Prawn Prons…

        • lem18
        • 4 months ago

        A friend of mine actually did that to a mutual friend of ours. The mutual friend was not impressed.

        • steelcity_ballin
        • 4 months ago

        Is that a new NPM package? God I can’t keep up with these web frameworks anymore.

        • Mr Bill
        • 4 months ago

        10 nm?

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