Asus doles out 10 boards based on Ryzen’s X570 chipset

As part of its announcements yesterday, AMD proudly boasted that it had strong support from its partners for the launch of its third-generation Ryzen CPUs. Specifically, the company said that it had "over 50" new motherboards on the way. Well, Asus is certainly doing its part—the company is releasing no less than ten different boards bearing the X570 chipset. The Republic of Gamers is here with both high-end Strix boards and premium Crosshair models, there's a TUF gaming board, a couple of more mainstream Prime offerings, and finally a Pro WS platter.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Formula

I'm not going to go over every single board in excruciating detail; if you're after that, Asus has a four-page article just for you. Instead, I'm just going to hit the highlights. Fully eight of the ten boards are standard-sized ATX boards, while one ROG Strix model is mini-ITX size, and the Crosshair VIII Impact is built for Mini-DTX. Experienced gerbils will be familiar with the sacrifices you make as you move down the product stack.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero

The top-end Crosshair VIII Formula has the works: a trio of PCIe x16 slots, Aquantia 5G Ethernet, 802.11ax Wi-Fi… and liquid-cooling for its gloriously overbuilt sixteen-stage power delivery hardware. Just as it's nothing we haven't seen before on a top-end motherboard, it's also exactly what we expect from same. The Crosshair VIII Hero is much the same motherboard, just meant for air-cooling. Compared to the top-end Formula, the Hero loses the LiveDash OLED and metal backplate, while the 5G LAN takes a hike in favor of a 2.5G chip. Don't worry; both boards have an Intel GbE controller onboard as well.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Impact with SO-DIMM.2 card installed

ROG's Crosshair VIII Impact is a tiny little thing. For those unfamiliar, DTX is a form factor created by AMD that is essentially mini-ITX with room for two expansion slots. There's still only one PCIe slot on the Impact, but the extra height—which would be required for a powerful graphics card, anyway—allows Asus to pack more stuff on the board. Said stuff includes virtually everything that comes on the Crosshair VIII Hero. There's only two DIMM slots, of course, and the pair of M.2 sockets have to go on a daughter card that plugs into that curious SO-DIMM slot. Otherwise, all you really lose going from Hero to Impact is four SATA ports and a couple of USB ports.

ASUS ROG Strix X570-F

Moving over to the ROG Strix family, the Strix X570-E and Strix X570-F are once again nearly identical. The main difference in the two is that the X570-E comes with Realtek 2.5G Ethernet and an Intel GbE LAN chip as well as 802.11ax Wi-Fi, while the X570-F only sports the single Intel Ethernet controller. Otherwise, the X570-F downgrades some of its USB Type-A ports to "USB 3.2 Gen 1"—better known as USB 3.0. Given that both boards come with eight USB ports onboard and another seven for front-panel plug-ins, it's probably not a problem. Probably.

ASUS ROG Strix X570-I

If you're a purist who prefers your mini-ITX boards to have proper mini-ITX dimensions, then you'll be pleased by the ROG Strix X570-I Gaming. This board is exactly what any gerbil expects to see when they hear "ROG Strix mini-ITX motherboard." It has gobs of RGB LED lighting, fairly aggressive (active) VRM cooling, and a pair of M.2 sockets—without using a daughtercard. It comes with the same SupremeFX S1220A audio that the rest of the ROG boards use, and Asus even found space for a dedicated AIO pump power header.

ASUS TUF X570-PLUS (Wi-Fi)

As we get down into the lower echelons of Asus' X570 motherboard range, the boards become harder to differentiate. The TUF X570-PLUS comes in both Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi-less versions. It trades out the SupremeFX audio solution for a simpler setup based around the same Realtek S1220A codec, and it doesn't have as many USB ports (7+6) as the more expensive boards. Otherwise, though, it's pretty similar to the other X570 boards Asus is launching, with its dual M.2 sockets wired up to PCIe 4.0 x4, eight SATA 6 Gbps ports, and thirteen USB ports (7 onboard, six front).

ASUS Prime X570-PRO

We reckon most gerbils will opt for something like the TUF board, or perhaps one of these Prime models. The Prime X570-PRO is actually a little fancier than the TUF model; it can run its PCIe x16 slots in x8/x8 mode. It also has a front-panel USB 3.2 Gen 2 (read: USB 3.1) port, and an extra fan header. This writer is using a similar board from Asus' Z370 series, and I'm pretty happy with it. The Prime X570-PRO gets Intel LAN once again, but the Prime X570-P steps down to a Realtek GbE chip, like its TUF cousin. In fact, that chip is apportioned almost identically to the TUF board, although it doesn't have the option of Wi-Fi nor any USB Type-C connectivity.

ASUS Pro WX 570-ACE

Finally, Asus is launching a workstation-oriented board for Zen 2. The Pro WS X570-ACE is a no-nonsense motherboard with a downright industrial-looking aesthetic. It supports ECC memory, includes a U.2 port, and it can send eight lanes of PCIe 4.0 to each of its three PCIe x16 slots. One of its M.2 sockets has to give up two of its lanes as a compromise, though. The Pro WS X570-ACE includes a Realtek 8117 chip that provides Gigabit Ethernet and out-of-band management capabilities. Asus makes much of the board's extra durability and reliability features, like its shielded Ethernet ports.

Asus isn't talking pricing or availability on any of these parts yet. Normally we'd make some glib quip about how they'll probably run from around $130 to $400 or so, but these are the very first motherboards we've written about designed for PCI Express 4.0. It will be interesting to see if building the boards around that new high-speed interconnect adds any additional cost to the construction, and if so, whether or not that premium gets passed on to the purchaser. 

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 6 months ago

    My one question: Is ASUS pulling the same misleading stuff with power phases on AMD boards as they are Z390 Intel boards?

    As nice as ASUS’ BIOS is, that alone convinced me this generation of ASUS mainboards wasn’t for me. That, and a high number of complaints about quality control on the Z390 boards being hit-or-miss.

      • Goty
      • 6 months ago

      I was wondering the same thing, but PCB shots from ASUS site seem to show one MOSFET per choke, so no doubling.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 6 months ago

        Doublers aren’t necessarily bad; as I understand it, ASUS didn’t even truly use doublers. They just used double the number of inductors and stages with a 4-phase design.

        Other designs using true phase doublers truly can claim to have the number of power phases they do; how good those phases are is dependent on the quality of the doublers. ASUS’ phase controller, unlike a system with legitimate phases using doublers, can only handle four phases to begin with, whereas another system might have a controller which can handle 12 phases (and is reaching those twelve by using doublers on a six-phase setup).

        I went with Gigabyte because the entire Aorus line had good quality voltage setups, even if the BIOS setup is more complicated and less intuitive than ASUS. Once I have the BIOS tweaked properly the first time around, I just save the config and don’t mess with it that often.

      • MOSFET
      • 6 months ago

      Buildzoid liked the Prime X370-Pro. I have that board and an ROG Strix X370-F and they both OC pretty well, beyond where I thought they would go.

    • sconesy
    • 6 months ago

    As much as I like the press release-style pieces I’d kill for full TR on-site Computex coverage like some of the bigger sites have…

    • failquail
    • 6 months ago

    Aww, no mATX boards again :/

    For me, ATX is too big and ITX too small and costly…

      • Voldenuit
      • 6 months ago

      Yeah, I finally moved from mATX to ATX when I upgraded from Haswell to Coffee Lake last year.

      It looks like motherboard manufacturers have mostly abandoned mATX to focus on ATX and mini-ITX.

      Bizzarely, there are still a lot of mATX cases on the market, including high end cases, despite mATX being relegated to H370/B360 and other budget boards.

      • Redocbew
      • 6 months ago

      The lack of mATX boards is weird especially considering there’s a good number of ITX boards being demoed already.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 6 months ago

        I wonder if there’s a difference B-series chipset that will be more what the mATX market is looking for.

          • Redocbew
          • 6 months ago

          I’ve heard that NZXT is just canning mATX products altogether. I didn’t even know they made motherboards, but I can’t imagine it’s a huge thing for them, and you could still mount a mATX board in a full ATX case, so I’m not sure how applicable that is to the industry overall.

          I guess PCIe 4 has complicated taking an ATX board and lopping off a few PCIe slots, or ITX boards are more popular than I thought.

      • DPete27
      • 6 months ago

      ATX has more expansion slots than MOST people ever use.
      ITX doesn’t have enough RAM slots**

      I proved a while back that it’s physically possible to fit 2 SODIMM slots in the length of a standard DIMM slot. That could result in 4 SODIMM slots. I’d take that on a DTX board!!

      • Chrispy_
      • 6 months ago

      A bigger problem than the lack of mATX boards is the lack of cases that adequately put the form-factor to good use.

      Compact cases are more often than not ruined by checkbox marketing features like support for massive 140mm radiator(s) and clearance for things that nobody buying a compact case has any interest in.

      Just about the only modern mATX case I can think of that has escaped the bloat of oversized radiator support and the blight of tempered-glass RGBLED madness is the [url=https://www.thermaltake.com/versa-h17.html<]Thermaltake Versa H17[/url<]. I wish it was shorter front to back, but Thermaltake didn't have the balls to release a version with no radiator support at all. Shame.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 6 months ago

        My current case is a [url=http://www.fractal-design.com/home/product/cases/define-series/define-mini-c<]Define Mini-C[/url<]. I previously used a [url=https://www.silverstonetek.com/product.php?pid=303&area=en<]Temjin TJ-08E[/url<] that's still serving well since I gave it to a family member. Folks that like windows and lights in their PCs have given good reviews to NZXT's [url=http://www.nzxt.com/products/h400i-matte-white<]H400i[/url<].

          • Chrispy_
          • 6 months ago

          Yep, the TJ-08E was my workhorse for two builds and I settled on an NZXT H400 a few years back after struggling to find a suitable-quality mATX case for myself.

        • sconesy
        • 6 months ago

        That’s a nice-looking case. I have a Raijintek Styx sitting in my closet waiting for my Ryzen build, one of the more compact mATX cases (plus no window!). But it is guilty of building in rad and full-size PSU support. I never planned to go ITX for the mobo but the only thing I really would want a second PCIe slot for is an m.2 expansion card. Waiting to see how the VRMs test on the B550 boards.

        • MOSFET
        • 6 months ago

        There are plenty of really nice mATX cases.

      • MOSFET
      • 6 months ago

      I couldn’t agree more, @failquail.

    • ptsant
    • 6 months ago

    Will need a new motherboard for the home server. Can’t decide whether I should keep the Crosshair VI I actually have and buy a cheaper MB for the server, or buy a new Crosshair and push the old one to the server. Also, do the Crosshair Hero and Formula have the same power delivery?

    • ronch
    • 6 months ago

    Such a far cry from when board makers shipped their K7 boards in plain white boxes in fear of being given less preferential treatment by some other company.

    • cozzicon
    • 7 months ago

    For the love of god- can we do away with the active cooling directly on the logic board? No matter how clean your environment that sleeve bearing will eat dust and die.

      • Redocbew
      • 6 months ago

      Spend a few more bucks for copper instead of aluminum, and make it a real heatsink with real fins. You’d probably be able to get by without the fan altogether. I wonder if we’re going to start seeing people swapping out the heatsink+fan for bigger flat-ish passive heatsinks.

      Return of the blorb! Except it’d be flat, so that’d make it a… florb?

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 6 months ago

        Thermalright [url=http://www.thermalright.com/product/hr-05-sliifx/<]HR-05-SLI/FX[/url<].

      • Hsldn
      • 6 months ago

      Not sure if it was Gigabyte or MSI , but one of them has a mainboard with passive cooling on the chipset.

    • Waco
    • 7 months ago

    Of all of those boards…the Pro is by far the most attractive of the set. That fan on the chipset is a disappointment though.

    I’m happy to see ECC support out of the box with Zen 2 as well!

    • BigTed
    • 7 months ago

    Is the sheer number of X570 boards from all brands a sign that the manufacturers know something we don’t?

      • Goty
      • 7 months ago

      I think yes, and I’ve seen that sentiment echoed by a number of people in the tech press.

    • ermo
    • 7 months ago

    That pro board hits all the spots for me, bar (possibly) one:

    I hope the firmware allows me to apportion extra M2 slot bandwidth at the expense of active PCIe Lanes in the last slot.

    3900X and Samsung B-Die ECC RAM here I come. If this allows me to have an unlocked multiplier along with ECC RAM, intel’s retarded Xeon vs K single-socket segmentation can go suck a lemon.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 6 months ago

      [quote<]..and Samsung B-Die ECC RAM here I come.[/quote<] Better hurry. [url<]https://www.techspot.com/news/79944-samsung-b-die-memory-receives-end-life-status.html[/url<]

      • LoneWolf15
      • 6 months ago

      The ROG Strix X570-F with WiFi added would be a pretty decent board I think, with a Ryzen 7 3xxxX

      I think the Coffee Lake-R K-series is pretty good too. I like both of them. Assuming one gets a good price and doesn’t get raked over the coals.

    • Questar
    • 7 months ago

    Every board I have seen so far has a fan on the chipset. I’m not liking that.

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      It is part of the opportunity cost of moving to PCIe 4.0.

      • The Egg
      • 7 months ago

      I’m sure they could be cooled with just a passive heatsink, but doing so would require reducing the number of plastic shrouds. Let’s not be ridiculous though. That’s just a completely unacceptable tradeoff. I’d be offended if anyone even suggested it.

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 months ago

        Well, obviously.

        You can’t have Arr Gee Bees without plastic shrouds.

      • Bauxite
      • 7 months ago

      One of the gigabyte non-waterblock models has no fan, only a heatpipe and metal all over the board. If only their bios stuff wasn’t so bleh.

      I don’t count waterblock boards not having a fan as they are completely different animals, although some of them still do.

    • The Egg
    • 7 months ago

    Needs more plastic shrouds, needs more RGB. Also, AMD’s claimed 50 models isn’t nearly enough. It’s almost acceptable if we’re only talking about a single manufacturer, but we need to hyper-segment even further. I’m sure they can come up with something. Also, I’m glad to see that high-RPM 40mm fans are back, because who doesn’t miss THAT, right guys?? Hooray!!

    /s
    (duh)

      • Wirko
      • 7 months ago

      50 is not so bad for an initial announcement. In a year or two we’ll get much closer to this number:

      [url=https://skinflint.co.uk/?cat=mbp4_1151v2&asuch=&bpmin=&bpmax=&v=e&hloc=de&hloc=uk&plz=&dist=&mail=&sort=t&bl1_id=30&togglecountry=set<][List of 1151 v2 motherboards sold in UK & Germany][/url<]

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 months ago

    Dear ASUS.

    An 11-Watt X570 chipset does NOT need active cooling. There are smaller passive heatsinks on your 50W graphics cards, thank you very much.

    Sincerely,

    Hater of whiny, ineffective, short-lifespan, cheap, chinese sleeve-bearing chipset fans.

      • Redocbew
      • 7 months ago

      So, you’re not a fan?

        • ermo
        • 7 months ago

        (in Chrispy_’s voice): “Blow me.”

      • Krogoth
      • 7 months ago

      It is due to clearance issues. The PCH hangs right below PCIe slot 1 which tends to be occupy by lengthy GPUs. 😉

      A short passive heatsink doesn’t cut it when it has to deal with heat radiated by aforementioned GPU that tends to be in PCIe slot 1.

      The alternative would be using heatpipes like some motherboard vendors use to do on higher-end boards back a decade ago.

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 months ago

        I think they should have used a heatpipe, even if it means shortening the NVMe slot to 2280.

        I mean, who uses a 22120 NVMe SSD anyway?

          • Chrispy_
          • 7 months ago

          This. It’s a consumer board.
          If people want 22120 ssd’s they can buy a bloody PCIe riser or a server board.

          • jihadjoe
          • 6 months ago

          Heatpipe to where though? Certainly not the VRM blocks because those would just transfer heat *to* the chipset block instead.

          IMO they should have just covered the entire area near the chipset with heatsink, like the armor thing on old ASUS Sabertooth motherboards.

            • Chrispy_
            • 6 months ago

            IMO the heapipe could just lead downward an inch or so that there’s a M.2 2280-sized heatsink above the second PCIe x16 slot. In all of the ATX boards above, that’s just wasted space that Asus is using for a logo and model number silkscreening. There’s nothing to stop them putting a heatsink there (with the Logo and model number if they want) with a heatpipe to the chipset.

            It’s 11 Watts. [url=https://www.scan.co.uk/images/products/super/2083442-l-a.jpg<]Here's a heatsink designed to handle 18-36 Watts, passively[/url<] If Asus simply piped to the logo area next to the battery, above the second PCIe x16 slot and installed a heatsink half the size of the one I just linked it would be overkill. That area is free from dual-slot coolers and in an area that most cases deliver great airflow to.

            • ermo
            • 6 months ago

            Didn’t one of the TR alumni work for ASUS? Geoff Casior (dissonance) maybe?

            If he’s still there, it might be worth it to try to reach out to him with your idea?

            EDIT: [url<]https://edgeup.asus.com/author/geoff-gasior/[/url<] <- dissonance is still there

            • Chrispy_
            • 6 months ago

            It’s not an idea, it’s simply common sense.

            Other manufacturers are offering fanless boards, and after thousands (no exaggeration) of builds I have come to see Asus as overpriced and burdened by too many models to keep on top of bugs. Their BIOSes are good, after about 6 months once all the revisions have wormed their way down to all eleventy-six zillion of their current model variants.

            Secondly, despite the HUGE number of models Asus offer for every single product type, they always seem to forget that the most important one to your average consumer is going to be an affordable one that covers the basics with good quality parts and none of the bling. Their PRIME boards were supposed to be this, but they seem to be $20 costlier than the competition and use inferior VRMs and audio codecs despite the price hike.

            /ASUS rant.

            • Redocbew
            • 6 months ago

            The heatpipe doesn’t really need to “go” anywhere. It could just circle around and connect back to the same heatsink, like heatpipes on CPU heatsinks do.

            A bigger heatsink that covers more of the PCB was more what I had in mind also though.

            • Voldenuit
            • 6 months ago

            If the heatsinks over the VRMs have enough surface area, they won’t get hot even if the VRMs are dissipating a lot of heat.

            Back in the day, I passively cooled a Radeon 4850 in a mATX case w an Arctic Cooling Accelero cooler, and it was cool to the touch under load even though the original (copper) heatsink was hot enough to scald the skin. Obviously there’s not enough surface area to accommodate as a big heatsink on a chipset, but there’s a lot of low hanging fruit that has not been harvested – just take a look at the useless cosmetic heatsinks on the VRMs in these boards – they’re garbage.

            There are a couple teardowns of X570 boards out there already, and all the teardowns of the chipset fans I’ve seen so far have had practically zero fin area. They could easily increase the surface area by 10-20x with proper passive heatsinks, but that would have cost a little more.

            Of course, part of the problem is that the PCH is 11W in regular use and up to 15W under heavy load. Sounds like the PCH needs more advanced power management and maybe a die shrink. But until we get an X670, board makers will have to design around the problem, and I’m not happy that they went with the chipset fan approach. Gigabyte has one model (the Aorus [s<]Ultra[/s<] Extreme) with what looks like passive cooling and a heatpipe, so it doesn't look like an insoluble problem. EDIT: The model I was thinking of was the Aorus Extreme, not the Ultra.

      • Bauxite
      • 7 months ago

      Gigabyte heard you apparently:

      [url<]https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/X570-AORUS-XTREME-rev-10[/url<]

        • Goty
        • 7 months ago

        If Gigabyte’s existing Xtreme boards are anything to go by, that’s going to be a $500+ motherboard…

          • Chrispy_
          • 6 months ago

          If you can afford to spend $500 on a motherboard, you can afford to move beyond the consumer AM4 platform altogether 😉

            • Goty
            • 6 months ago

            Maybe! Can you imagine how much a new, high-end X499 (or whatever they would call it) board might cost? X399 wasn’t exactly cheap to begin with!

            • Chrispy_
            • 6 months ago

            $400-500. I’ve bought several of them for Threadripper nodes and the chipset makes up an almost negligible percentage of the board cost 😉

      • Spunjji
      • 6 months ago

      Case in point – the ITX and DTX boards don’t even seem to have the chipset present up top. Presumably it’s underneath with a large heat spreader, based on the 3/4 view of the DTX board.

      I imagine that probably adds to board cost due to extra layers, but still, if you can do passive chipset cooling on a tiny board then having active on the ATX designs is absurd.

    • Goty
    • 7 months ago

    The formula is a dumb product. The overbuilt VRM is exactly the reason you [i<]don't[/i<] need more exotic cooling solutions. If you're pushing enough power to the CPU that you need more than case airflow to cool that VRM, you're probably using LN2 anyway... *EDIT* Unless, of course, ASUS is doubling up on power stages like they do on their higher end Intel boards right now, which would make this a dumb product for other reasons. That being said, the weight being thrown behind the Ryzen 3000 parts by mobo makers is certainly encouraging. Either they've been selling enough first- and second-gen parts that they can justify this sort of investment in AMD again or they have a good level of confidence that AMD is going to be selling a lot of chips to enthusiasts in the near future.

    • adisor19
    • 7 months ago

    None of them with 3 x 3 WiFi.

    WHAT YEAR IS THIS ?!

    Adi

      • Vaughn
      • 7 months ago

      Who uses’s Wifi on a desktop PC?

      Even with AX those of us that care about jitter and latency still a no no.

      And how does the workstation board only have 1Gbps nic and realtek not even intel ???

        • Bauxite
        • 7 months ago

        The realjunk port is for dedicated IPMI LAN only, pretty much all the server boards do the same. The really awful ones have a shared port.

        Ditto on wifi, its handy for casual desktop use but anyone that gives a damn runs a wire.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 7 months ago

      What, you don’t have a hand-made cross-over cable?

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