National Creativity Day Shortbread

One of my dumb jokes as a kid was to walk up to someone and ask them to draw a blank. It worked.

PC hardware, computing, and RGB LEDs

  1. Noctua NH-U12A cooler review @ Guru3D
  2. Elgato Stream Deck XL review @ Hexus
  3. DIYPC Trio-GT-RGB review @ TechPowerUp

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Quake II's lighting goes up to eleven for 2019 @ Quarter To Three

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. Wireless LEDs aren't a first, but you can make your own @ HackADay
  2. Two self-driving startups team up to build a different kind of lidar @ Ars Technica (a good read to keep you up to speed)

Science, technology, and space news

  1. Moonrise to bring 3D laser printing to the lunar surface @ New Atlas
  2. Google to restrict modern ad blocking Chrome extensions to enterprise users @ Slashdot
  3. Curiosity strikes clay in new samples, further proving Mars' watery past @ New Atlas
  4. The 2019 Roomba gets an all-new design, companion mop-bot @ Ars Technica (so, it looks like Neato's stuff now, nice)

Cheese, memes, what have you

  1. Will Smith brought a mac and cheese food truck to the set of Aladdin @ delish.com
  2. Spray cheese would count as staple under Trump food stamp rule @ bloomberg.com
  3. Domino's AI-powered pizza scanners make sure its pies are the real deal @ New Atlas (words can't express how happy this makes me)
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • superjawes
    • 3 months ago

    [url=https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/30/18645250/microsoft-xbox-game-studios-publishing-valve-steam-32-bit-windows<]Microsoft will distribute more Xbox titles through Steam and finally support Win32 games[/url<] That's...interesting. MS have been making a lot of consumer-friendly moves lately, so I am curious as to where this all leads. Are they going to keep going blow-for-blow with Sony in the console space? Or are they going to shift to more of a developer/publisher mode and get their games to a wider audience? It's also interesting because I can see the "Xbox Live" side of things being able to function as a service, providing many of the non-store features of Steam that people like. If they focused entirely on making a good service, they might have better tools to compete with Epic and Valve, with the added bonus of having their own games to sell on the platform (something Epic are severely lacking). Regardless, it does sound like PC gamers are going to get more access to MS-owned games, and that is definitely a good things. EDIT: and OF COURSE I see the TR post minutes after I leave this comment...

    • The Egg
    • 3 months ago

    [quote<]Google to restrict modern ad blocking Chrome extensions to enterprise users @ Slashdot[/quote<] How is this not huge news? If Google proceeds as planned, I will "drop Chrome" in the same manner that Jeff Daniels did in the Dumb And Dumber bathroom scene.

      • drfish
      • 3 months ago

      [quote<]How is this not huge news?[/quote<] Think about that question for a second. 😉

      • oldog
      • 3 months ago

      Be Brave!

        • K-L-Waster
        • 3 months ago

        Problem with that is Brave is based on Chromium — so it would still be affected by this change.

          • NovusBogus
          • 3 months ago

          Bah, I’ll just join the dark side and use Microsoft Edge…oh, wait.

          “Well, we’re boned.”

      • Redocbew
      • 3 months ago

      Ad blockers can use the declarativeNetRequest API instead of webRequest. There’s a page from the Chrome developer docs which shows how to do almost this exact thing.

      [url<]https://developer.chrome.com/extensions/declarativeNetRequest[/url<] From what I've read it's a pain in the neck to use, and the switch is sure to cause a bit of a mess, but webRequest really does need to be overhauled to the point where it would end up being a different API anyway.

        • Goty
        • 3 months ago

        The problem is that this is a rules-based system and is limited to 30,000 rules whereas ad blockers that currently use similar systems may use in excess of 75,000 rules, making it a woefully inadequate replacement.

          • Redocbew
          • 3 months ago

          Yes, and it’s the browser which will be doing the filtering not the extension. I’m not a fan of the Brave browser, but they did do a study a while ago which showed that most of those rules are inactive. It made sense to me considering that there really aren’t that many big advertising companies on the web these days. 30k should be enough assuming the list is well maintained.

          Enforcing that is why the blocking action from webRequest is being deprecated. There’s a better way to make this work than allowing extensions to sift through a huge list of mostly useless rules for every request. Not to mention the security implications of allowing extensions this much access to things that should be happening within the browser its self.

          [url<]https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.09160.pdf[/url<]

            • Goty
            • 3 months ago

            This was a test of a single ad blocker with a unique set of rules, and this sort of testing is of limited usefulness in the first place. Either way, I’d just as soon move to a browser that lets users block ads in the manner they choose.

            • Redocbew
            • 3 months ago

            I don’t know what you mean by “this kind of testing”, but in any case this was a test of the list used by several of the most popular ad blockers. Chances are if this change causes a mass-pruning of that list, then that’s going to affect Firefox also. Since most of the rules are inactive, then I suppose this is a wonderful opportunity to be a sheep and believe the Internet Echo Chamber instead of what’s objectively true, because you probably won’t notice the difference anyway.

            If you’re looking for an angle here where Google is the evil empire, then you should look at the rules around updating an existing filter list. Defining the filter list for an extension happens during install, so it can’t be updated without installing a new version of the extension. Google’s built in ad blocker doesn’t have that restriction.

            • Goty
            • 3 months ago

            By “this kind of testing,” I mean testing a small sample of websites using a single rules list. The best conclusion that can be drawn from the study is that the majority of rules used in EasyList were not activated on that small sample of websites. Sure, that may be meaningful for the “average” web user, but that’s a profile that fits very few people exactly. It is for that reason and for the fact that I think each user should be afforded the greatest control to browse the internet as they see fit that I disagree with this change.

            As for the rest of your comment, that’s a wonderful straw man you’ve constructed. I’ve never professed feelings for Google one way or another (I’m a heavy user of Google services, if it makes any difference), so implying that I’m a sheep and trying to lump me in with a group of people that think Google is evil isn’t going to get you anywhere.

            • Redocbew
            • 3 months ago

            I called you a sheep because there’s no story here. Google is not killing ad blockers. There will be no meaningful restrictions(save one, maybe). If you disagree that’s fine, but we’re not discussing philosophy or creative writing here. You don’t have the option of countering facts and figures with personal opinion.

            I would say that 10k is a bit small for a representative sample, and it’s true that there’s often a lot of churn in any list of the “most popular” web sites. As I said, I’m not a fan of Brave in general, but I can’t find too much fault in the study its self. The churn works in our favor in this case since it increases the number of unique web sites that are being tested. Furthermore, it wasn’t 10k sites being tested in total, but 10k being tested each day for two months. We don’t care which sites are being tested at all really, but only that they use popular means of advertising.

            As for using only a “single list”, blocklists will naturally become centralized as is the case with EasyList. It’s the blocklist used for Adblock, uBlock Origin, and Ghostery which covers a huge portion of the people running an ad blocker(maybe even the majority). Again, let me reiterate this doesn’t have anything to do with the specific browser you use. The list is shared across extensions and browsers. If you’re not happy with that choice, then I’m not sure what else you’d like to see tested instead.

            The only real problem I see with Google moving the filtering into the browser core is that it makes heuristic based ad blocking by extensions impossible. Using a heuristic based solution would get around the issue of blocklists entirely, but I’m not sure it’d really be any better. Instead of managing a list of rules you’d be managing a set of heuristics to defeat any shenanigans advertisers might use to defeat the blockers, and the nice thing about a blocklist is you can prune and manage the list without changing the core logic of the application.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 months ago

    >Will Smith brought a mac and cheese food truck to the set of Aladdin @ delish.com

    Did it have blue cheese?

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 3 months ago

      I’m afraid I just blue myself

      [url<]https://media.giphy.com/media/fj3CWRJJshhe/giphy.gif[/url<]

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 months ago

    Google to restrict modern ad blocking Chrome extensions to enterprise users @ Slashdot

    Anyone else in need of a new browser?

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 3 months ago

      Nope. Don’t use ad blocking. I just don’t use sites that have annoying ads.

        • NovusBogus
        • 3 months ago

        This is typically what I do. Also, risky browsing happens in a Linux VM.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 months ago

      Hm.. may be time to revisit Firefox…

        • Wirko
        • 3 months ago

        I just told FF to block trackers. The effect is that I see few ads on certain sites, including TR, Anand, and Extremetech. But not Hexus, for example. [It took me a long time but I’ve got used to their layout and can even find some content buried among ads.]

        • NovusBogus
        • 3 months ago

        Mozilla supposedly gets most of its money from Google so it might be a short-lived reunion if the silent partner gets a strong motivation to make some changes.

      • SonicSilicon
      • 3 months ago

      I used Chromium instead of Chrome. Just for those few sites which Firefox didn’t seem to handle properly.

      • willmore
      • 3 months ago

      Nope, I already use Firefox. 🙂

        • jihadjoe
        • 3 months ago

        Triple-browsing with Chrome, Firefox and Palemoon here lol.

        Chrome for work because cloud-based providers validate for it first.

        FireFox for my own browsing, and PaleMoon as sort of a compatibility mode for sites that need FF’s old plugin format.

      • DeadOfKnight
      • 2 months ago

      Pi-Hole takes care of the ads for me, so it’s not going to make any difference.

    • Generic
    • 3 months ago

    I don’t often get to post first, but when I do; it’s creative.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 months ago

      Did you edit out the creative part?

        • Generic
        • 3 months ago

        *hangs head*
        Take my up vote, and get out.

        • thedosbox
        • 3 months ago

        he was expecting everyone else to be creative in their replies

      • meerkt
      • 3 months ago

      5th!!1

        • Wirko
        • 3 months ago

        √(asc(dollar sign))th!

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